Focus

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For my focus, I will be discussing the significance of the Large Hadron Collider and the Higgs Boson on the development of the scientific community and on the Standard Model of particle physics. My research covered preliminary/background information on my topic, ranging from the description of the Higgs Field to the Standard model. I plan on incorporating my research into my IBP, to ensure full comprehension of the material for the reader.
Furthermore, the influence of the LHC and the HB carries such significance on my subject matter, and I will have to describe the influence from a somewhat unbiased standpoint, as the information is relatively new. However, I will neither relinquish nor extinguish any passion or perspective from my article.
Below is my current “official” source list; I tend to use a lot of informative youtube videos for my research, and I will have to locate their sources in order to fully capture the identity of my information.
IBPs look great people. Keep em coming.
Please, please leave thoughts in the comments. Do you feel as if my research is too limited? Maybe I haven’t made it simple enough for some random person to understand, or maybe you might think I don’t know enough! Please leave thoughts in the comments. Thank you.

Source List:

Works Cited
Evans, Lyndon. “The Large Hadron Collider, a Personal Recollection.” Progress of Theoretical and Experimental Physics. Oxford Journals, 10 Feb. 2014. Web. 24 July 2014.
Evans, Lyndon. “The Large Hadron Collider.” Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society. Royal Society Publishing, 16 Jan. 2012. Web. 24 July 2014.
Salgado, C. A. “Proton-Nucleus Collisions at the LHC: Scientific Opportunities and Requirements.” CERN Document Server. Journal of Physics G: Nuclear and Particle Physics, 8 Dec. 2011. Web. 24 July 2014.

Holmes, Nigel. “What Is the Higgs?” The New York Times. The New York Times, 07 Oct. 2013. Web. 24 July 2014.

Reflections/Progress Report – Almahmouda

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Throughout the past week, I have felt myself drift away from complete research on my Inquiry Based Project. Rather, the assignments pertaining to nuggets and concept experiences have taken up a considerable amount of my time.

I’m at a crossroads.

At one point, I greatly value the structured schedule given to us in class: the due dates were clear; the assignments made transparent; the posts were aligned. Although the first 4 weeks were structured, I was able to effectively portray any idea, emotion, or belief through any of the assigned posts! The beauty of thoughtvectors lies in their nature, as they act similarly to metamediums.

In the previous week, however, the time given to us to research and inform our classmates about our respective IBP proved invaluable; I sifted through countless sources and materials to find the most best and most diverse theories and perspective on the topic of the Higgs Boson. At times, however, I found myself slacking off more than I had in the first three weeks, as I was not required to make a post every day or limit myself to two posts in one day. Yet, in both class structures, I felt as if I performed to the best of my abilities, and I am satisfied so far with my performance.

I am beginning to see that everything in this course is connected, whether it be man-computer symbiosis and expanding technological prowess, or the comments on my internet history.

I cannot wait for the IBPs; they are going to be spectacular.

 

The Intentions of a Blogging Student CE5 – Almahmouda

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Nugget Post from Personal Dynamic Media.

For this post, I tried to increase reader interaction. I mentioned memorized facts because I aimed to stress how certain facts stick with the mind after years of other experiences and facts memorized. My mention to Mosha Bar’s article was to establish a sense of ethos, or validity, to my point; anyone can blog about short-term memorization, (anyone can also reference an article 🙂 ) but referencing an outside source indicates that the ideas can be new but also grounded.
After referencing Bar’s article, I quoted and challenged him on an idea he had for why humans retain their memories. I felt as if the quote supported my point to a fault, and I aimed to ameliorate any discrepancies between my idea and his idea, referring back to my original idea, within this post, that an outside source can strengthen a point but also leave room for innovation.
I challenged the quote with personal memories that some Virginia natives might have:

“What about familial memories, like that time you were a child, picking apples on Carter Mountain with your grandparents?”

Unconsciously, my mind (and probably the mind of the reader) will search for memories relating to gradnparents despite the lack of an approaching event that will test their knowledge of apple-picking.
I then went on to finalize my idea and thoughtvector; only certain memories and ideas can be extended through devices while being able to sustain their emotional prowess. To wrap my nugget post up, I formulated an analogous cute.
http://uvamagazine.org/images/uploads/2009/fall/carter-mountain.jpg

The Higgs Field – RESEARCH!

To begin my first research post, I needed to establish my topic’s relevancy to the reader. What better way to establish importance than to suggest lack of existence without the topic, the Higgs Field?
I could have been lying to the reader, of course, about the lack of existence without my topic, but I assured the reader, that he or she would indeed cease to exist without my topic, by referencing a quote and video of a well-established professor, Alex Read of the University of Oslo.
Once I captured the reader’s attention, I tried to produce an eloquent analogy that further stressed the significance of my topic. Once I have the reader questioning and thinking critically about my quote, he or she is in the best position to read, analyze, and critique my main topic. As a result, I begin truly discussing my main topic, and yet, I need to introduce the Higgs Field such that anyone without a physics degree can understand.
By inserting rhetorical questions, I can establish a connection with the reader who might pose the same questions to me. Also, I can use the questions as good fencing to guide the reader through my article, and perhaps the question could spur challenging, new questions from the reader. Clearly, the use of rhetorical questions is advantageous to the blogger, as they offer many uses that go beyond the formulaic approach.
To solve the questions and clarify my topic, I take advantage of an easy-to-understand story told by many CERN scientists to help explain what it is they do. To further enhance understanding of the material, I inserted pictures guiding the reader in the story. In order for my purpose to be understood, I stressed certain words to create a conceptual network within the reader’s mind, each word meticulously emphasized and placed in a location within the sentence, paragraph, and post.
Throughout the story aspect of my post, I answered the questions I posed. However, if I failed to answer either the questions I posed or the question the reader has, I encouraged him or her to view external sources that might explain the concept better than I did. I also posted those sources to show the scope of my research for the post, as I extracted certain pieces of information from each source and compiled them into the post.
The Higgs Boson post required a plethora of skills, sources, and tricks in order for my readers to understand the true purpose of my post.

Concept Experience 2 – Almahmouda

To begin my second concept experience, I began with an obvious statement:

Nothing can travel through space faster than light.

One of the reasons for why I chose the statement rested in the fact that I knew the answer would contain mathematical calculation, an area that I adore greatly. I had to establish a good sense of logos within my post, combined with a transparent approach, in order to successfully answer the question.
I’ll admit it, I cut corners by using dictionary.com, but there are a large amount of veritable scientific dictionaries that differ in their explanation of a concept. Using Dictionary.com was a clean-cut answer for a definition, but the definition was not truly encompassing of the complexity of my statement. I left the reader thinking that my statement was thoughtless from the beginning!
Although I approached Dictionary.com and Yourdictionary.com, I still managed to insert a reference to a credible source, establishing a sense of ethos. If the reader read between the lines, and kept up, he or she would have seen that I wove in 2 of the 3 modes of persuasion, with pathos (appealing to the reader’s emotions) left out. Establishing a strong sense of ethos and logos is imperative in conveying a perspective in the scientific community, as “logic” and “credibility” are quite difficult to refute.
The mathematical calculation of my post, or Why is nothing faster than light?, hit the nail on the logos aspect of my perspective, or argument. There are very few cases in mathematics where a solution is subjective or dependant on “emotional/personal perspective.” Therefore, establishing logos with mathematics creates a strong solution for readers to understand agree on.
The final aspect of my post discusses a more personal tone in comparison with the rest of my post. I reflected on the operations of my post, hopefully innovating myself or the reader to view technology not only as a formulaic, computational machine, but also a metamedium.

Nugget Post – Almahmouda

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“Devices” which variously store, retrieve, or manipulate information in the form of messages embedded in a medium have been in existence for thousands of years. People use them to communicate ideas and feelings both to others and back to themselves. Although thinking goes on in one’s head, external media serve to materialize thoughts and, through feedback, to augment the actual paths the thinking follows. Methods discovered in one medium provide metaphors which contribute new ways to think about notions in other media.

Hadrons are Baryons and Mesons.
A carboxylic acid functional group is -COOH.
The pH of 1M HCL is 0, a pure acid.

I memorize very few facts that I do not use daily or week. For the facts that I use daily and weekly, I do not try to memorize them, and yet, I remember them with ease.

http://articles.latimes.com/2011/may/29/opinion/la-oe-bar-memory-20110529

Moshe Bar’s article, Human memory: What did you do last Sunday?, successfully illustrates the extent of the human memory;

We use our experiences, as captured in memory, to anticipate and prepare for upcoming events and encounters.

Why then, should we use our memories for anything else? Would memorizing anything that does not prepare us for the future truly behoove us? What about familial memories, like that time you were a child, picking apples on Carter Mountain with your grandparents?

Externalizing our memories, through diaries, blogs, or publishings, offers an extension to the mind, relieving pressure to memorize every fact. Imagine having to memorize everything about the Battle of Manassas. Outside of very few moments, memorizing those facts is utterly useless! However, if one were to want to learn more about the Battle of Manassas, one can search the thousands of online databases, articles, and websites solely dedicated to supplying information to the individual.

Yet, can we, in all of our power, externalize the power of emotional memories? How powerful is a holocaust story that someone has reblogged for the hundredth time compared to recalling it first hand from the survivor himself or herself? I am not criticizing external memory; I am a huge advocate. I believe, however, that only certain memories and ideas can be extended through devices while being able to sustain their emotional prowess.

The mind is like the ocean; we can try and bottle individual waters to remember them, but they radiate even greatly when they’re a part of the whole.

Reflection! – Almahmouda

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Through my past week of research, I’ve learned that particle physics is a doozy! I’ve dived into similar complex fields before, but the research, combined with the Thoughtvectors, helped me piece together thoughts and ideas from separate fields into a domain that I have created to help me explain the importance of the Higgs Boson. However, I have learned so much about particle physics along the way, whether it be that hadrons are mesons and baryons, or the interactions with the Higgs field are responsible for mass.
I have a lot more to learn, but I am sure this IBP will demonstrate the greatest extent I know of how the Higgs Boson, Higgs field, and the Large Hadron Collider are relevant in almost all domains of life.

THE Large Hadron Collider – Research 2

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If you’ve been keeping with my posts, you are now informed of the Higgs Boson! 🙂
I’m sure you’ve heard by now, but if you haven’t, July 4, 2012 marked the day that ATLAS , a particle detector experiment located in the Large Hadron Collider, detected signs of the aftermath of a Higgs Boson.

If Large Hadron Collider and ATLAS are words that confuse you, allow me to explain. Hadrons are subatomic particles composed of quarks held together by the strong force, and there are two classes of hadrons: baryons and mesons.
Baryons are subatomic particles that are composed of 3 quarks or 3 antiquarks, held together by the strong nuclear force; protons and neutrons are examples of baryons.

Mesons are subatomic particles that are composed of a quark and an antiquark, also held together by the strong nuclear force, pions and antipions are examples of mesons.
Now, the Large Hadron Collider performs what the name implies; The LHC is a series of loops that uses electric fields to speed hydrogen protons, an example of a hadron, to 99.9999991% the speed of light. The LHC then collides the particles in detector experiments, such as ATLAS and ALICE, that collect data. Scientists at CERN then analyze the collected data in hopes of finding data that resembles the predicted data of a Higgs Boson.

The ATLAS detector

The significance of the discovery of the Higgs Boson proves the existence of the Higgs field, and the Standard Model of particle physics. The Standard Model of particle physics is a theory concerning the weak nuclear force, strong nuclear force, and the electromagnetic force, and how these fundamental forces govern the dynamics of subatomic particles, like leptons, bosons, and quarks.

The Standard Model

Now, you do not need to understand the Standard Model to know that the fundamental forces are linked with subatomic particles. However, the Standard Model needed one more variable to validate the equation, the Higgs. When it was found that the Higgs Boson actually existed, the Standard Model became a highly-supported theory capable of explaining many particle physics phenomena.

More research to come! 🙂

The Higgs Field – RESEARCH!

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Screen Shot 2014-07-08 at 6.05.37 PM“Without the field that the Higgs Boson comes from, some very important fundamental particles, like the electron wouldn’t have any mass. In that case, electrons would zoom across the universe at the speed of light without being trapped into atoms. Without atoms we wouldn’t have any chemistry. Without chemistry, there would be no biology. And without biology, there would be no life, here on earth.”
~ Prof. Alex Read

As a physicist, the idea of entropy does not intimidate me as much as it should; the very notion that every object in the universe will degrade to atoms and fundamental particles tends to terrorize the mind. Nevertheless, Professor Alex forced me to stop and think, to truly think about the margin of error in life. It is not a matter of being “blessed” or “fortunate;” our existence is intricate and tortuous, with each aspect carefully intertwined with another. Truly, our existence is marred with various scientific fields, such as the electromagnetic field or the Higgs field, and we cannot exist without such fields.

Our existence rests on a pillar of sand, with each grain supporting the structure of the whole. Each grain is dire to the structure, as there exists an astronomical degree of interdependent dimensions within the structure. And yet, over either an everlasting or instantaneous period of time, the pillar will degrade, and each grain of sand that composed the pillar from which you stood will disperse throughout the beach of humanity, furnishing the creation of another pillar.

What is a Higgs field? What role does the Higgs field serve in this reflection? Why am I talking about the Higgs field and not the Higgs Boson?

Simply put, imagine a large group of CERN scientists at a bar. Picture a tax collector walking through the crowd.

Screen Shot 2014-07-08 at 7.06.43 PMWill he have a hard time getting through the crowd?
Probably not!

Screen Shot 2014-07-08 at 7.10.17 PMMost tax collectors do not interact with most scientists in the same way that some particles do not interact with the Higgs field, such as the photon. Particles, such as the photon, that do not interact with Higgs field are called massless.

Now, imagine the man himself, Peter Higgs, entered the bar filled with CERN scientists.

Screen Shot 2014-07-08 at 7.12.12 PMWill Higgs have a hard time getting through the group of scientists?
Probably so! Who can resist those floating, bushy eyebrows? Personally, they remind me of an albino squirrel’s tail 🙂

Screen Shot 2014-07-08 at 7.15.19 PM Higgs will most likely have a difficult time getting through the group, as the group of scientists carry a strong desire to discuss their work with him. The interaction with the group of scientists yields Peter Higgs’ unforgettable trait, his mass.

The interaction with the Higgs Field grants the particle its respective mass, just as the interaction with the crowd granted Peter Higgs a longer time to get through the crowd. Remember, Peter Higgs and the tax collector were equal in mass before entering the room (0 interaction).Screen Shot 2014-07-08 at 7.21.25 PM

However, as the Higgs field interacted with each of them, they received their amount of mass.

Wait, you still haven’t explained the HIGGS BOSON.
Oh, how aware I am of that fact.

The Higgs Boson is the rumor that Albert Einstein has re-emerged from the dead. As a man in the corridor in another room whispers the news to his friend, the equally dispersed scientists catch wind and proceed to clump together to discuss.

Screen Shot 2014-07-08 at 7.29.06 PMAs they finish discussing, they returning to their original spot, and another subgroup of scientists hear the rumor. The scientists that have just heard the rumor begin to clump together to discuss. Another subgroup hears, and the pattern continues throughout the group. The continuous clumping of scientists is the Higgs Boson, and that clumping is responsible for the interaction between Peter Higgs and the scientists, and to an extent, responsible for all mass. The Higgs Field is composed of Higgs Bosons.

The Higgs Boson is a grain in the pillar of sand that helps support you. The Higgs Boson has always been on the beach, and many think it’s important in knowing how the beach came into existence.

Still confused about the Higgs boson? I expect you to be! 🙂
I wish I knew how to embed this into my post, but alas, I cannot. Please check this comic out!

Sources list (Because i didnt make the pictures, video, or quote!):




http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2013/10/08/science/the-higgs-boson.html?_r=0#/?g=true&higgs1_slide=0

Inquiry Based Project #2 – Almahmouda

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After reading comments and consulting my classmates, I have come to the conclusion that my topic could be difficult to understand, and yet, I am even more attracted to the challenge of making sure it is comprehensible. I need to establish a scholarly style while maintaining an understandable tone throughout my inquiry, too.  Personally, I feel as if this topic is rich with information that is pertinent to almost any facet of life; we can all benefit from having learned something about the Higgs-Boson.

Area Of Inquiry

My area of inquiry resides in the immense field of research behind finding another Higgs Boson, and the discovery of the Boson itself. Truly, an area of science so grandiose requires a  large, almost unmatched base of research for support. The European Organization for Nuclear Research, or CERN, designed the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), “the world’s largest and most powerful particle accelerator, to research a variety of controversial questions, such as discovering the origins of mass. Discovering the Higgs Boson not only leads the science community to the origins of mass, but also to the completion of the Standard Model, an equation relating an object’s basic particles and governing forces. Quarks, gravitons, and muons: if they don’t sound familiar, that’s okay! My inquiry based project (IBP) revolves around the importance of the Boson relative to the Standard Model, Large Hadron Collider, and the science world, hopefully leaving my reader with an elementary understanding of the Standard Model, Higgs Boson, LHC, and CERN.

Direction (Vector) Of Inquiry

As my introduction tended to be a little vague in describing my real area of intended study, I will clarify and direct my inquiry based project. I will study the impact of the Higgs Boson on the Science community pertaining to the Standard Model. Seems a touch repetitive, but I would sincerely enjoy hearing opinions on this matter.

Your Project In The Concept Space Of The Web

For my project in the Concept Space of the web, I would try and incorporate external articles from CERN, and I would be more than willing to mention multiple classmates’ IBPs if they were to relate to my IBP. Since the material will be very science-oriented, I will insert images and graphs to help explain my IBP. If anyone reading this post has further suggestions/ideas/comments, please post them! I can only develop this IBP to be so great on my own, and I believe advice will help me bring this IBP to the next level.

Source List
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RIg1Vh7uPyw
http://www.smithsonianmag.com/science-nature/how-the-higgs-boson-was-found-4723520/?no-ist

http://www.stfc.ac.uk/2861.aspx
http://home.web.cern.ch/about/physics/standard-model
http://science.howstuffworks.com/higgs-boson.htm

I will continue my research on the topic, and I will edit this post with more links. As I’ve stated before, if anybody reading this post has helpful links that are relative to this post, please post them 🙂

Nugget Post #4 – Almahmouda EVEN MORE MEANINGFUL

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“Any nitwit can understand computers, and many do. Unfortunately, due to ridiculous historical circumstances, computers have been made a mystery to most of the world. And this situation does not seem to be improving. You hear more and more about computers, but to most people it’s just one big blur. The people who know about computers often seem unwilling to explain things or answer your questions. Stereotyped notions develop about computers operating in fixed ways—and so confusion increases. The chasm between laymen and computer people widens fast and dangerously.”

Pretentious.
Ostentatious.
Showy.
Grandiose.
Highfalutin!
Or are they?
I believe in capitalism, but I am a strong proponent of sharing information. If someone goes out of their way to learn code, should he or she be responsible to answer questions, or “explain things?” After reading Ted Nelson, I left with my brain contorted; although the chasm between laymen and computer people widens fast and dangerously, which group should really be in the wrong for such a gap? Is there a wrong?

I have come to the conclusion that both groups are in the wrong, yet there are individuals within each group who attempt to ameliorate the widening wound.

The laymen: the common man, whose design is no design, must make an effort to learn more about the technological craze that has been sweeping the nation for the last half-century. Furthermore, he must realize that the jobs that do not require technological skill, especially pertaining to computers, are beginning to minimize in quantity.

The computer people:  a group of individuals who are skilled in the realms of computation and technology must try their best to integrate computational technology into the markets where there is a large group of laborers, should they seek to make a profit. They do not have an obligation to educate every laymen they encounter, and yet they do; the expenditure of energy, time, and other resources on an another individual may seem altruistic, but it can operate out of self-interest! Should the newly-informed individual utilize more computational technology, the “computer people” will be able to sell more product.

However, should the gap between the laymen and computer people be bridged? As critical thinkers and scholars, we must undertake the responsibility to really think about this question. Perhaps specialization is a must in the field of technology; we should not view it as a reserve of power to a group of people, but a sort of symbiotic relationship between the laymen and computer people! The laymen could acquire the parts, and meld them into the required shape, and the computer people can assemble and use the computers!

What do you guys think? Did you like the poem? What about the duties of the laymen and the computer people? Also, if the picture offends any individual, I will take it down at a second’s notice. It made me chuckle.

Nugget Post #4 – almahmouda

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“Any nitwit can understand computers, and many do. Unfortunately, due to ridiculous historical circumstances, computers have been made a mystery to most of the world. And this situation does not seem to be improving. You hear more and more about computers, but to most people it’s just one big blur. The people who know about computers often seem unwilling to explain things or answer your questions. Stereotyped notions develop about computers operating in fixed ways—and so confusion increases. The chasm between laymen and computer people widens fast and dangerously.”

Pretentious.
Ostentatious.
Showy.
Grandiose.
Highfalutin!
Or are they?
I believe in capitalism, but I am a strong proponent of sharing information. If someone goes out of their way to learn code, should he or she be responsible to answer questions, or “explain things?” After reading Ted Nelson, I left with my brain contorted; although the chasm between laymen and computer people widens fast and dangerously, which group should really be in the wrong for such a gap? Is there a wrong?

I have come to the conclusion that both groups are in the wrong, yet there are individuals within each group who attempt to ameliorate the widening wound.

The laymen: the common man, whose design is no design, must make an effort to learn more about the technological craze that has been sweeping the nation for the last half-century. Furthermore, he must realize that the jobs that do not require technological skill, especially pertaining to computers, are beginning to minimize in quantity.

The computer people:  a group of individuals who are skilled in the realms of computation and technology must try their best to integrate computational technology into the markets where there is a large group of laborers, should they seek to make a profit. They do not have an obligation to educate every laymen they encounter, and yet they do; the expenditure of energy, time, and other resources on an another individual may seem altruistic, but it can operate out of self-interest! Should the newly-informed individual utilize more computational technology, the “computer people” will be able to sell more product.http://www.glashole.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/03/tumblr_mo6w8rGSmh1sr8ltxo1_500.jpg

What do you guys think? Did you like the poem? What about the duties of the laymen and the computer people? Also, if the picture offends any individual, I will take it down at a second’s notice. It made me chuckle.