Synthesis Matrix

Research Question:  Is my consumption of second-hand clothing a positive action that advocated for businesses? Or was I taking resources intended for people who needed them more than I did?

Fetishized thrifting culture contributes to gentrification The Gentrification of Thrifting Understanding the purchasing behaviour of second-hand fashion shoppers in a non-profit thrift store context Trade and Transformations of Secondhand Clothing: Introduction
Type of Source Substantive Substantive Scholarly – Peer-Reviewed Scholarly
Purpose Inform those about the impact of thrift shopping and how it affects lower-class communities Inform those about the impact of thrift shopping and how it affects lower-class communities Understanding the purchasing behaviour of second-hand fashion shoppers in a non-profit thrift store context Inform readers about the process of second-hand clothing shops and how they help reduce waste in our world.
Intended Audience Higher-class secondhand/resale shoppers Higher-class secondhand/resale shoppers Second-hand shop owners
Credibility x x Peer Reviewed Scholarly
Positive impacts in increased popularity of thrift shops “Goodwill Industries and The Salvation Army both employ community members and help surrounding communities by using funds to support individuals and communities economically, allowing the two thrift chains to both employ and serve surrounding communities” (Bither) “It’s financially responsible, environmentally friendly, and can be a fun and exciting experience. For many young, economizing people, thrifting was/is an affordable way to bring more variety to one’s wardrobe and explore identity through fashion.” (Tabio)

“It reduces the amount of clothing waste in landfills and cuts back on the demand for new clothes produced through child labor overseas.” (Tabio)

“Low-income people and college students having a relatively small budget are more likely to shop at thrift stores selling gently used products at lower prices” (Seo & Kim)

“People who care about sustainability are more likely to shop at thrift stores than people who are indifferent regarding sustainability” (Seo & Kim)

“If we recycle unused clothes, that means we won’t be paying the price in the future.” (Norris)

“Clothes get a longer lifespan.” (Norris)

“That means one pair of jeans could be used by someone else’s sibling, cousin, or friend. You paid a small amount and the benefits were a hundred times over.” (Norris)

“you might have to be penny pinching at least once in your lifetime and secondhand clothing stores have been supporting people of all income ranges for a long time.” (Norris)

Negative impacts in increased popularity of thrift shops “Their rise in popularity as well as the radical shift in their image has prompted them to cater to a more elite range of clients.” (Bither) “Since then the influx of demand by more economically-advantaged people has caused many thrift stores to raise their prices, exacerbating income inequality and effectively marginalizing the population that needs their resources the most” (Tabio)
Resources that the working-class and low-income communities lose “Thrift stores that can’t keep pace with these upgrades were forced to close for good when they ran out of funds…the recent store closures leave many members of these communities without affordable ways to buy clothing and other household items” (Bither)

“Affluent groups who shop at more traditional thrift stores take away valuable resources from communities who rely on those resources to survive.” (Bither)

“economic reality is turbulent and even used clothes are out of reach.” (Tabio)
The gentrification of thrift stores “Hubbard (Urban Studies Professor Philip Hubbard at King’s College) stated that more affluent young people tend to shop at both thrift stores and boutique vintage stores, but shopping at the latter tends to signal the gentrification of communities.” (Bither) “that the additional business allows privileged people to come into these areas to shop, live, or build their own businesses, they often displace those already living and working there.” (Tabio)
Solutions “One way to do so is to look for stores that cater to your economic status, the types of places that provide lower prices than found at a traditional retailer but don’t take away resources from others who are more in need.” (Tabio)

“shop at stores that give back to marginalized communities in a meaningful way” (Tabio)

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