Concept Experience 5

This concept experience asks you to make what Engelbart calls a conceptual network

WHAT IS A CONCEPTUAL NETWORK?

Here’s what Engelbart writes about conceptual networks. Notice that he uses the word “argument” as a way of thinking about “concepts.” That’s an interesting move.

Conceptually speaking, however, an argument is not a serial affair. It is sequential, I grant you, because some statements have to follow others, but this doesn’t imply that its nature is necessarily serial. We usually string Statement B after Statement A, with Statements C, D, E, F, and so on following in that order–this is a serial structuring of our symbols. Perhaps each statement logically followed from all those which preceded it on the serial list, and if so, then the conceptual structuring would also be serial in nature, and it would be nicely matched for us by the symbol structuring.

But a more typical case might find A to be an independent statement, B dependent upon A, C and D independent, E depending upon D and B, E dependent upon C, and F dependent upon A, D, and E. See, sequential but not serial? A conceptual network but not a conceptual chain. The old paper and pencil methods of manipulating symbols just weren’t very adaptable to making and using symbol structures to match the ways we make and use conceptual structures. With the new symbol-manipulating methods here, we have terrific flexibility for matching the two, and boy, it really pays off in the way you can tie into your work.

STEP ONE: RECAP

You’ve completed these written assignments:

AS WE MAY THINK NUGGET

CONCEPT EXP 1: HOW DOES IT FEEL WHEN I THINK?

CONCEPT EXP 2: ASSOCIATIVE TRAILS

IP: HOW DO YOU LIVE ONLINE?

MAN-COMPUTER SYMBIOSIS NUGGET (LINK TO A WEB SITE)

CONCEPT EXP 3: CONNECT YOUR COLLEAGUES

REVISED MAN COMPUTER SYMBOIOSIS NUGGET

CONCEPT EXP 4: FORMULATED VS FORUMULATIVE PROBLEMS

AUGMENTING HUMAN INTELLIGENCE NUGGET

Go back and read all your writing above, as well as all the comments you’ve received. Take some notes about any patterns you see, anything at all that suggests not a chain but a network.

STEP TWO: MAKE A CONCEPTUAL NETWORK

Write a blog post in which you do the following:

  1. Select two of your favorite sentences from each of your written assignments. These need not be consecutive sentences. This assignment may be more fun and interesting if they’re not. You should have a total of eighteen sentences.
  2. Select a favorite sentence from four other students’ blog posts. (Total: four sentences.) Copy the URL from each post for your later reference. Note: this URL should be the “permalink,” i.e., the link to the post itself, not simply to the blog. You can find the permalink by clicking on the title of the post. When you see that post only, along with its comments (if any), look at the URL in the address bar. That’s the URL you want.
  3. Select two of your favorite sentences from each of the readings so far: Bush’s “As We May Think,” Licklider’s “Man-Computer Symbiosis,” and the excerpts we read from “Augmenting Human Intellect: A Conceptual Framework.” Note the URL for each reading. For the Engelbart reading, note the “purple number” next to the paragraph in which your sentence appears. You can get a very precise URL (an “anchor point”) that way. Seehttp://christinaincs.wordpress.com/2014/06/10/tips-for-blogging-about-doug-engelbart-and-his-work/. This step yields six sentences. As before, the two sentences from each reading do not have to be consecutive. It may be more fun and interesting if they are not.
  4. You now have twenty-eight sentences. Now make a conceptual network out of them. Arrange the sentences in an order, and in paragraphs, in ways that make sense as a total post of twenty-eight sentences. In each sentence, choose one word that you will link to the original post or reading. Try to choose a word that’s not only a keyword but also an inviting or intriguing word, the kind of link word that your reader won’t be able to resist clicking on. This is both an informational and an aesthetic decision. Your conceptual network (the concept space you create out of these thought vectors) should be coherent and persuasive, but it should also be interesting, and fun to explore.

This is a more involved concept experience than any you have attempted so far, so do not wait to get started! Category for this post: conceptual network

 

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