Bicycle Urbanism Blog

Welcome to the Bicycle Urbanism class blog.   The posts below reflect students’ answers to the question: “What makes a city bicycle-friendly?” Students are encouraged to explore this question from any number of angles, including physical biking infrastructure, bike access,  bike programs or events, or a broader bike culture or economy.

Students, see the more detailed instructions on the Course Activities page.  Please enter your blog posts and follow-up responses in the comment boxes below.

I like the take-care-of-yourself vibe of our pro-cycling city. The grunge vibe of it. The don’t-mess-with me- “I will mess you up” kind of vibe. A city that can foster that kind of feeling in a cyclist is a good thing. It shows that the city isn’t so bad that people are afraid to ride … Continue reading Ridin’ in da city, G.
I like the take-care-of-yourself vibe of our pro-cycling city. The grunge vibe of it. The don’t-mess-with me- “I will mess you up” kind of vibe. A city that can foster that kind of feeling in a cyclist is a good thing. It shows that the city isn’t so bad that people are afraid to ride … Continue reading Ridin’ in da city, G.
Let me open with my biking background wherein my first experience riding a bicycle for non-recreational purposes was as a freshman at Virginia Commonwealth University. I enjoyed riding back and forth to my classes and other places around campus, because it was honestly more convenient that driving or walking, and I lived close enough to … Continue reading Parks and Parking: Bicycle Friendlessness in Urban Environments
Before taking this course I assumed that a “bike friendly” community just meant that there were a lot of people within the community that rode bikes. Now that I’ve completed the surveys and mapping project I understand that there is a lot more to it. Also, riding a bike a few times a week has … Continue reading Bike-Friendliness
Before taking this course I assumed that a “bike friendly” community just meant that there were a lot of people within the community that rode bikes. Now that I’ve completed the surveys and mapping project I understand that there is a lot more to it. Also, riding a bike a few times a week has … Continue reading Bike-Friendliness
There are cities across the country that have implemented fantastic cycling infrastructure. Bike lanes, bike parking, and properly maintained infrastructure are all key features of a strong biking community. One perspective that is often left out is the mentality and mindset towards cycling and a more bike-able environment in general. Richmond is home to many … Continue reading Bike Friendly: A Mindset
The biggest obstacle any city faces trying to become bike-friendly is the modification of its car culture. In many ways bicycle infrastructure already exists, but roads continue to be dominated by automobiles and desensitized drivers. Cyclists are subject to distracted motorists who are not accustomed to sharing the road. Changing this alone can create bicycle-friendliness … Continue reading Bicycle friendly city, what does it look like?
What makes a city bicycle-friendly? To me, cities that are bicycle friendly are cities that promote, encourage, and entice citizens to choose cycling as a safe and viable option of transportation. Promoting and encouraging cycling are key parts of a city becoming bicycle friendly. Supporting and encouraging citizens to choose cycling is an important step. … Continue reading Bicycle Friendly City Blog
A Bike Friendly City There are several ways a city can be bike friendly. Statistics show that traveling by bike just makes sense; bikes emit zero carbon emissions, it is physically healthy, it is economically healthy—Alta Group’s report for Portland, OR showed economic activity related to biking was $90 million. The most recent news for … Continue reading A Bike Friendly City
Last year I studied abroad for a year in Copenhagen, which is a city very well known for being bicycle-friendly. I did not truly understand what that meant until I had lived and interacted with the urban landscape for over a month or so. Before I knew it, I was picking up the rhythms of … Continue reading Blog
When I Think of what makes a city bike friendly, I think of dedicated lanes, separate lights, dedicated bridges, and all the bells and whistles of places like Copenhagen and Amsterdam. Which are all things that can definitely set great cycling cities aside from other cities, but there is definitely something more to using bikes … Continue reading The Base of a Bike Friendly city