REU: Mechanisms of Evolution

The REU Site: Mechanisms of Evolution is accepting applications.

This NSF supported program provides students with an opportunity to perform independent research under the guidance of a faculty mentor.

Participants receive a $5,750 stipend ($575 per week), travel subsidy and complimentary housing in a UNLV dormitory.

The program dates are May 30 to Aug 3, 2018.

Please direct your undergraduate associates to the list of mentors and the on-line application at  https://www.unlv.edu/lifesciences/moereu/

The application deadline is Saturday April 7, 2018.

A complete application includes a one-page career essay, transcripts and one letter of recommendation.

Interested students may moereu@unlv.edu for additional information.

 

Summer Field Assistant at Rocky Mountain Biological Laboratory

Field assistant for summer 2018

Overview: Two research groups at Duke University are seeking a shared research assistant for fieldwork in plant and insect ecology and evolution. This is a unique experience for students enthusiastic about plant ecology to gain experience working on two different projects in one summer! The projects are non-overlapping in time; there is opportunity for leisure time between project dates, or if the technician desires to stay at the field station for the duration of the summer, start dates for project 2 are flexible.

Location: Our research is conducted at and around the Rocky Mountain Biological Laboratory, located in southwestern Colorado
(www.rmbl.org). We will provide all transportation to and from the
field station and from the station to research sites.

Dates:  June 18-June 29 (project 1) and July 16-August 10 (project 2; somewhat flexible) 2018

For a PDF version of the project descriptions, please visit:
http://bit.ly/RMBLfield18

Project 1 Summary: The time of the year when a plant begins to grow, produces flowers, and loses its leaves is important for successful reproduction, survival, and potentially future growth. Plants rely on environmental cues, such as temperature and the amount of sunlight, to time these life cycle events. Therefore, the time when a plant begins to flower can be very sensitive to climate change. For example, snow has been melting earlier in the season in sub alpine regions than the recent past as a result of warming temperatures. Since the time of flowering for some plants occurs
shortly after snow melt, they track these warm temperatures and emerge or flower earlier in the season. Interestingly, not all plants respond similarly to the same environmental signals; some flowering species do not flower any earlier. As each plant species responds differently to earlier snow melt, species that didn’t flower together in the past have the potential to overlap now. If plant species grow and flower at the same time, they could compete for resources (water, nutrients, soil). Our research examines the link between climate change, the timing of life cycle events in plants, and how they compete for resources. We propose to manipulate flowering phenology of plants in resource competition experiment. We will
observe how competition for soil and light resources between two
co-flowering species changes under early snow melt conditions. The results from this research have the potential to help us predict how climate change may affect species interactions in the future. For more information, visit:
http://rebeccadalt.weebly.com/research-projects.html

Project 2 Summary: In the Mitchell-Olds lab at Duke University
(https://sites.duke.edu/tmolab/), we study plant evolution, ecology, and genetics. We are broadly interested in understanding how the diverse traits present in natural plant populations have arisen via natural selection, and what the consequences of trait variation are for ecological interactions. Much of our research is centered around understanding how chemical anti-herbivore defenses have evolved in the wildflower species Boechera stricta. We have ongoing experiments monitoring how interacting selective pressures of herbivore consumption and drought stress influence the
evolution of defensive chemicals, and for discovering the genetic basis of plant chemistry as well as other complex traits (e.g. flowering time, mutualistic plant-insect associations, plant architecture, fitness). Our technician would help with data collection and experimental maintenance on both of these projects (see “Expectations” below).

Expectations: The field assistant will be asked to aid in data collection, entry, and analysis for both projects. This includes assisting in demographic data collection on perennial plants, assessing phenology of plants in pre-existing plots (project 1) and measuring plant survival, growth, flowering, reproduction, and herbivore damage, as well as taking environmental measurements such as soil moisture (project 2). Fieldwork can be strenuous and often involves long days in the sun and hiking. Applicants with previous experience doing fieldwork are encouraged to apply, but no prior experience is required and we will happily train first-timers with a strong interest in ecology.

In addition to helping with fieldwork five days per week, the technician will be expected to be an active participant in the research community, which includes attending weekly seminars at RMBL, attending in a weekly lab meeting, and participating in discussions about scientific articles and ongoing research projects in the lab.

Compensation: This is an unpaid position, although housing and travel expenses will be provided. Transportation from RMBL to all field sites will be provided (car or hiking).  The technician will be required to pay for their own food expenses, but all other costs (housing and station fees) will be covered.

Application: Please send a short cover letter and resume to both Rebecca Dalton (rmd34@duke.edu) and Lauren Carley (lnc14@duke.edu) by March 20, 2018.

Summer Field Technicians at Hoosier National Forest

Field Technicians: Oak forest regeneration and restoration

Job Description:
We are hiring two technicians to collect field data at sites within the
Hoosier National Forest in southern Indiana as part of a collaborative study between Purdue University and the USDA Forest Service.  The goal of the project is to determine how overstory removal, competition control and prescribed fire can be used to regenerate and maintain oak forests.

Duration:
Mid-May to August 2018 (40 hours/week)

Pay:
$11.50 per hour. Housing is included.

Experience and Skills:
The ability to identify woody plants of the Midwest is strongly desired. We also desire basic knowledge of forest measurement practices, experience with backcountry navigation using a topographic map and compass, familiarity with standard equipment including GPS, and experience/training in identifying herbaceous vegetation. Applicants must possess a valid driver’s license.

To apply:
Please email a cover letter describing your qualifications, resume
(including contact information for two references) and unofficial
transcripts to Mike Jenkins (jenkinma@purdue.edu).  We will begin
reviewing applications on April 4, 2018 and will continue until the
positions are filled.

Contact:
Please contact Mike Jenkins if you have any questions about the positions.

EarthHacks – March 17-18, 2018

EarthHacks

MARCH 17-18, 2018 | SCIENCE MUSEUM OF VIRGINIA
2500 W. Broad St., Richmond VA 23220

EarthHacks is an innovation-focused event where students from all majors develop solutions to real-world environmental challenges. Multidisciplinary teams will have 24 hours to learn from mentors, brainstorm and generate solutions to some of the world’s most pressing problems. Depending upon the problem, proposed solutions can involve hardware, software, art, text and other materials. The three challenge categories are:

POLLUTION

Pollution is the interference of contaminants with the natural world, degrading natural resources and putting plant, animal and human life in danger.

RENEWABLE
ENERGY

Renewable energy is power harvested from resources that are not in danger or being depleted, such as wind, sunlight, geothermal energy, waves and tides, rain and bioenergy.

CONSERVATION TECHNOLOGY

Conservation technology is the modernization and introduction of technology to the conservation fields, spurring ecological, agricultural and wildlife-focused innovation.

    Register at this link today!    

Visit EarthHacks.vcu.edu for more information.

Spit for Science recruiting undergrad research assistants for Fall 2018

Spit4Science is now accepting applications for the Fall 2018 undergraduate research team. I wondered if you all might be willing to spread the word about this opportunity? I’m attaching our informational flyer that also contains a link to the application.

WHAT IS SPIT4SCIENCE?
VCU-wide research project
Goal: understand how genetic and environmental factors
come together to influence a variety of health-related outcomes
in the VCU undergraduate population
www.spit4science.vcu.edu

WHY BE INVOLVED?
Be involved in recruitment, marketing, data collection and
analysis, and other research activities
Work in teams to develop research questions and analyze
Spit for Science data
Meet different faculty involved in the project

CLASS DETAILS
Application only
Three credits
A-F grading system
Students from all class levels and majors are
encouraged to apply

Questions? Please contact
adkinsae@vcu.edu.

Apply via https://redcap.vcu.edu/surveys/?s=F8NWWPA9W7 

Applications due by Monday, March 26 at 5:00 PM.

S4Sflyer_Fall18

Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden is now accepting applications for our 2018 Horticulture Research Internship.

Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden is now accepting applications for our 2018 Horticulture Research Internship.

Job Description

Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden’s Horticulture Team is seeking an inquisitive, dynamic, hard-working and enthusiastic research intern who is excited about spending the summer learning the art and craft of horticulture while implementing and completing a plant-based research project. The intern will work in all Garden areas, assisting staff and volunteers with the challenging, hands-on tasks of managing and curating a wide variety of seasonal displays, garden areas, plant collections and departmental initiatives. When not scheduled to conduct research, the intern can expect to weed, rake, groom, prune, plant, mulch and haul debris in seasonal extremes and all weather conditions on a daily basis.

Responsibilities

Research Tasks

  • Work with Director and Manager of Horticulture to execute a summer research project, designed to address a current challenge faced by the Horticulture Department (examples of past topics: water quality monitoring, integrated pest management resources and strategies, food crop production, medicinal plants and benthic macroinvertebrate population surveys)
  • Compile research into a user-friendly resource to share with the department, Garden and guests
  • Prepare and present a report of experience, procedures and findings to Garden staff and guests

Horticulture Tasks

  • Assist horticulturists in all areas of the Garden with wide variety of primary garden care tasks, including planting, mulching, grooming, watering, fertilizing, weeding, etc., using best horticulture practices in accordance with established Garden standards
  • Participate in routine group tasks such as leaf blowing walkways and string trimming weeds
  • Perform routine maintenance on Garden power tools and equipment such as filling gas cans, re-stringing trimmers, cleaning and sanitizing tools, and keeping equipment organized and tidy

To apply, please see the full 2018 Horticulture Research Intern job description and forward a resume and cover letter to George Cowart, Horticulture Manager, at georgec@lewisginter.org

Would you mind pushing out or posting the following the attached job description?

For additional information, please visit the employment page of our website.

 Thank you so much,

Laurel

__

 Laurel Matthew
Senior Horticulturist

804.262.9887, ext. 333 804.929.5857

laurelm@lewisginter.org

1800 Lakeside Avenue
Richmond, VA 23228