Synthesis Matrix

How can America Next Top Models use Facebook and Instagram (social media) to help teens have a positive self-image?

“America’s Next Top Model” should use personal pictures of the contestants of all shapes and sizes instead of professional pictures on their Facebook and Instagram page because:

Synthesis Matrix 2

After finishing my Synthesis Matrix I have come across a gap within my evidence. To elaborate, I have sources that mostly support my first two claims and somewhat of my third claim. I have sources that support each claim for my topic, but most sources strongly support my second claim. I knew that i wasnt going to find alot of support for my third claim, but i have enough to make an argument and to support the idea. Only one of my articles lack evidence for my first two claims and only focuses on the third claim, but becuase it is a scholarly source, i find this okay. I realize i have to do some more research for my third claim in order to have a strong stance/ support system for my paper.  I need to find more evidence that will support my third claim,  find a better way to re-word my claim, or just think of a new claim all together.  I realized that the more scholarly articles I add to my research, the most evidence and support I will have for my claims. With this being said, I believe that I will continue to search for more scholarly articles because there is a lot more evidence than in a peer-reviewed article. But after completing this assignment, I see that i have a strong topic and will be on a good start with my first two claims.

Bessenoff, Gayle. “Can the Media Affect Us? Social Comparison, Self-Discrepancy, and the Thin Ideal.” Academic Search Complete. EBSCO, 1 Sept. 2006. Web. 21 July 2014.

Booker, Kristin. “Mo’ Selfies, Mo’ Problems? How Those Pics Can Chip Away At Your Self-Esteem.” Refinery29. Refinery29, 29 July 2013. Web. 10 July 2014.

Briggs, Helen. “‘Selfie’ Body Image Warning Issued.” BBC News. BBC News, 10 Apr. 2104. Web. 10 July 2014.

Dahl, Melissa. “Selfie-esteem: Teens Say Selfies Give a Confidence Boost.” TODAY. Today, 26 Feb. 2014. Web. 08 July 2014.

Grabe, Shelly, L. Monique Ward, and Janet Shibley Hyde. “The Role of the Media in Body Image Concerns among Women: A Meta-analysis of Experimental and Correlational Studies.” Psychological Bulletin 134.3 (2008): 460-76. Google Scholar. Psychological Bulletin, 15 Jan. 2008. Web. 07 July 2014.

Lou, Melissa. “Striving to Be Thin.” Forest Park Review. Forest Park Review, 15 June 2005. Web. 16 July 2014.

Sifferlin, Alexandra. “Why Selfies Matter | TIME.com.” Time. Time,    06 Sept. 2013. Web. 02 July 2014.

Teresa Bell, Beth, and Helga Dittmar. “Does Media Type Matter? The Role of Identification in Adolescent Girls’ Media Consumption and the Impact of Different Thin-Ideal Media on Body Image.” Academic Search Complete. EBSCO, 15 Apr. 2011. Web. 21 July 2014.

Walker, Melissa. “The Good, the Bad, and the Unexpected Consequences of Selfie Obsession.” Teenvogue Content. Teen Vogue, 11 Sept. 2013. Web. 03 July 2014.

 

Because Clauses

” America’s Next Top Model” should use personal pictures of the contestants of all shapes and sizes instead of professional pictures on their Facebook and Instagram page becuase:

1. it will allow teenage viewers to understand that the media accepts people of all shapes and sizes

2. it will boost self- confidence for the teen viewers

3. it will show viewers that taking unprofessional pictures and not being all ” dolled up” for the camera is completely acceptable.

Part 2:

1.Alexandra Sifferlin, a TIME magazine journalist, argues that  “Even apart from situations where selfies can inform emotional or behavioral problems, for example, the material that children and adolescents view online — selfies included — can be influential in molding their sense of self.”

Sifferlin, Alexandra. “Why Selfies Matter | TIME.com.” Time. Time,    06 Sept. 2013. Web. 02 July 2014.

2.  Melissa Walker wrote an article about the pros and cons of selfies in the Teen Vogue Magazine and agrees with what the faculty director of the media psychology program at the Massachusetts School of Professional Psychology, Pamela Rutledge, states,”The cult of the selfie celebrates regular people,”

Walker, Melissa. “The Good, the Bad, and the Unexpected Consequences of Selfie Obsession.” Teenvogue Content. Teen Vogue, 11 Sept. 2013. Web. 03 July 2014.

3.  Three Psychological Bulletin scholars, Shelly Grabe, Monique L. Ward, and Janet Shibley Hyde, acknowledge the idea that,”It is believed that the media’s consistent depiction of a thin ideal leads women to see this ideal as normative, expected, and central to attractiveness. However, because media presenta- tions of women’s bodies are so skewed, showcasing an ideal that is out of reach to most, adopting this reality may lead to decreased satisfaction with one’s own body”

Grabe, Shelly, L. Monique Ward, and Janet Shibley Hyde. “The Role of the Media in Body Image Concerns among Women: A Meta-analysis of Experimental and Correlational Studies.” Psychological Bulletin 134.3 (2008): 460-76. Google Scholar. Psychological Bulletin, 15 Jan. 2008. Web. 07 July 2014.

Research Nugget 4

Link 1

Russello, Salenna. “The Impact of Media Exposure on Self-Esteem and Body Satisfaction in Men and Women,” Journal of Interdisciplinary Undergraduate Research: Vol. 1, Article 4. 22 Apr. 2013. Web. 16 July 2014.

Main claim: Women are affected more by the media, regarding beauty and body-image, than men because of the amount of time spent with interacting with the media.

Nugget 1: “Since self-esteem and body satisfaction are related, it is no surprise that the media has just as strong an influence on body satisfaction as it does on self-esteem. Watson and Vaughn(2006) stated that sociocultural pressures to adhere to the ideal body image, as is reinforced by the media, is the cause for the large amount of body dissatisfaction found in many individuals, especially women. Exposure to media can not only cause body dissatisfaction, but body dissatisfaction can also cause one to be more apt to expose oneself to certain types of media that feed that dissatisfaction (Aubrey,2006). Body dissatisfaction and self-esteem are also both affected by how an individual compares themselves to those media images.”

It is known that if you are not satisfied with your body then you will develop low self-esteem until you become comfortable with your skin. ANTM can serve as a show that people turn to when they become uncomfortable with their body becuase of the ideal body being captured on that specific show.

Nugget 2: “Sociocultural ideals, like the thin-ideal, are most influential when they are internalized. Internalization of sociocultural ideals of attractiveness is accepting or agreeing with social standards of beauty. Sometimes these ideals are internalized without one realizing that they are. Since media has a large part in spreading society’s ideals it is no surprise that researchers have found that increased media consumption leads to increased internalization of the thin-ideal (e.g.,Miller & Halberstadt, 2005; Tiggemann,2003). Once that ideal in internalized it affects how one views their body and comparisons are made between their body and what society’s standards are.”

The media shows that it is ONLY acceptable to be thin, anything else is not “media worthy”. This is how they make viewers feel and this is what causes them to develop discomfort with their body. The media needs to realize the fact that everybody comes in different shapes and sizes. ANTM has began to do better with accepting this idea becuase they are beginning to put models on the show that are not all skinny or “model perfect”.

Link 2

Serdar, Kasey L. “Female Body Image and the Mass Media: Perspectives on How Women Internalize the Ideal Beauty Standard.” Westminster College. Wesminster College, 2005. Web. 16 July 2014.

Main claim: Kasey Serdar points out the different reasons that contribute to the way women view themselves after getting so involved with the media.

Nugget 1: “Sociocultural standards of feminine beauty are presented in almost all forms of popular media, barraging women with images that portray what is considered to be the “ideal body.” Such standards of beauty are almost completely unattainable for most women; a majority of the models displayed on television and in advertisements are well below what is considered healthy body weight. Mass media’s use of such unrealistic models sends an implicit message that in order for a woman to be considered beautiful,they have to be unhealthy

This nugget focuses on the idea that in order to be a model, you have to be extremely thin, almost to the point where you are anorexic. If this is the image that models want to send to their audience then they are doing a great job. But to be more realistic, ANTM has began to put contestants of all sizes on the show,in order to let viewers know that you can be any size to be considered beautiful and “model type”.

Nugget 2: “the basis of self-schema theory is that women use three points of reference to construct their perceptions about their own physical appearance: the socially represented ideal body, the objective body, and the internalized ideal body. The portrayals of women by the media and other important individuals in a person’s life influence the socially represented ideal body. This reference point comes from what an individual believes is expected by society with respect to physical appearance and beauty. In contrast, the objective body involves a person’s own evaluation of their body. A person’s satisfaction and dissatisfaction with aspects of their physical appearance are contained within this dimension; individuals almost always have some opinion about their physical demeanor. The internalized ideal body involves the level at which an individual endorses the ideal image and aspires to achieve it. Some women can be exposed to images of thin women and not internalize such standards of appearance because they know they are unrealistic. In contrast, some women’s internalized ideal is very similar to the socially represented ideal, which makes them particularly vulnerable to the powerful effects of the media (Sands & Wardle, 2003).

Some women, not all women, are affected by what they see as “attractive” to the media. But because of how much the media only focuses on the “thin ideal” , it makes it extremely hard for women to feel comfortable in their skin if they are thick or almost on the fat side. The media just dismisses the idea that anything other than thin is attractive.

Link 3:

Lou, Melissa. “Striving to Be Thin.” Forest Park Review. Forest Park Review, 15 June 2005. Web. 16 July 2014.

Main claim: Females between the ages 7 and 12 are influenced by the media the most. They are trying to find their identity and work on how to be accepted by society based off of what they see is accepted in the media.

Nugget 1: “The latency age, between 7 and 12, is the period of time when you take in the ideals of society,” Lavoll said. “Earlier than that you are taking in the ideals of the parents; a 10-year-old has taken in both the values of the parents and society. They have already internalized that it is good to be thin.” This age, she said, is dangerous because if the children don’t have other influences, or if the message that they have to mold themselves into a certain body type is not broken through organizations besides the home, then all the kids are left with is the media-driven message that says ‘thin is best.'”

The media can have an effect on people beginning at the age of 7. It is horrifying knowing that just at 7 years old, they can begin to feel uncomfortable in their skin based off of what the media focuses on. The younger they are, the more “vulnerable” they are when it comes to what is accepted and what isnt. They begin to try to fit in and find their identity.

Nugget 2: “Success is an American ideal. In our culture hard work is valued, [so it becomes a] competition for who can be the prettiest,” Lavoll said. “The fallout is that if you can’t get your ideal appearance, you think, what can I do to get me there? This is the root of eating disorders. They [young women] perceive their value lies in their looks, in looking a sanctioned way.”Parents also play a role in the dangerous spiral of image consciousness, Lavoll said, adding that parents want so badly to have their children be successful, they often consciously or unconsciously put pressure on their children.”I had one person I work with now whose mother, when she was 5-years-old put her on a diet. [Image consciousness] is so infused in our environment, where thin is good and heavy is bad.”

 When people have an idea of how they wanna look, they begin to make goals. But when the media only shows people that are skinny, it makes women think that they have to be “stick-thin”. It is not impossible to get skinny, but people go about it the wrong way. They begin to starve themselves and diet rather than exercise. It is a false rumor that models only eat cotton balls and water in order to stay thin. That is not a way to get skinny ! Models do not even do that.

SYNTHESIS:  All three sources are similar in the idea that they talk about the affect that the media has on people and their self-image. They build on one another because although they are bout the same topic, each article goes in depth even more. They all agree with the idea that the more the media focuses only on being thin, the more the people in our society will be less comfortable with their image. It is not impossible to become “model material” becuase Tyra Banks has included women that were skinny, plus-size, had mental disorders, and different skin on her show to be contestants for ANTM. It is possible to look good in your skin without causing harm or decreasing your self-esteem. Although in the second article it talks about the specific age group that is most affected, everybody at some point in life experiences some type of discomfort with their body image.  Body image should be solely based on what the person thinks of themself instead of how the media corrupts their mind in order to feel acceptable.

Nugget 6

“Devices” which variously store, retrieve, or manipulate information in the form of messages embedded in a medium have been in existence for thousands of years. People use them to communicate ideas and feelings both to others and back to themselves. Although thinking goes on in one’s head, external media serve to materialize thoughts and, through feedback, to augment the actual paths the thinking follows. Methods discovered in one medium provide metaphors which contribute new ways to think about notions in other media.”

-Alan Key and Adele Goldberg

This is a very interesting and relevant “nugget” because this small excerpt from the article has a lot to do with our class. The authors talk about the main roles of these “devices”, new and old. I found it relevant to what we have been doing in our UNIV 200 class, recently, because we have been receiving feedback from our professor and peers, finding resources and storing them on Diigo, and “manipulating” the articles to find what will be used in our papers and what is most important about the article.

The authors say that “Although thinking goes on in one’s head, external media serve to materialize thoughts and, through feedback, to augment the actual paths the thinking follows.” This quote reminded me of the first article and second article that we had to read in the beginning of this class.  The way we allow ourselves to think involves both the media and our self-knowledge. We depend on the findings and resources provided to us on the internet, magazines, and other media because it is where most of the knowledge, now, resides. We build off of what we find and take our thinking process from there.

Reflective Writing #5

Part 1: The first thing i did  after reading this article, was think about the most important keywords and names from the article, what would make this article more resourceful, how could I make this more “media involved” , should I include links to the author and to the names mentioned, and could I illustrate the topic of the paper. I decide to include a picture of the Facebook page with the words “psychological experiment” written across it, because that is what this article was about. I didn’t really take in consideration of where I should put the picture because I didn’t think it would make much of a difference.  I decided to add links to specific keywords, such as : the title of the paper and the website that the paper was published on, Facebook policy,  Adam Kramer, and interview. These words stuck out the most to me because I felt like they could be explored deeper. I also felt like it would give readers a break from just reading the article and explore some of the things mentioned throughout the article. I felt it was most important to mention and provide a link to Adam Kramer and his interview because I felt like it would provide more background for the article. I also thought it would be helpful to include a video of Kramer and his idea behind the experiment.

 

Part 2: For my Inquiry Project, I thought it would be creative to include short video clips from the show “America’s Next Top Model”; specifically when they are judging the models, doing makeovers, and when choosing the models. Also I would like to include a song about self-image (since music is apart of the media) called Pretty Hurts. I will include a variety of pictures from the models on the show and include empowering quotes from the show that was said by Tyra Bankers, herself. As for the location of my Project, I haven’t thought much about it because this is my first time EVER posting personal writing and projects online. I will try to make my project look like something more than just 3500 words. I truly believe that I will enjoy creating this project because I love the idea of including a variety of things into our “paper” and I love my topic.

Here are an idea of what my project will possibly build off of : Link 1

Research Nugget 3

Link 1:

Booker, Kristin. “Mo’ Selfies, Mo’ Problems? How Those Pics Can Chip Away At Your Self-Esteem.” Refinery29. Refinery29, 29 July 2013. Web. 10 July 2014.

Main claim: Kristin’s main argument is that selfies have more positive effects than negative. She points out both the pros and cons of the posting selfies, but in the end , ended up having more positive things.

Nugget 1: “Jess Weiner, Global Self-Esteem Ambassador for Dove, a social messaging strategist, and CEO of Talk to Jess, has seen a considerable rise in self-esteem issues with the pressure to constantly be camera-ready. “I have seen a remarkable shift is self-esteem issues with the rise of the selfies,” she says. “The pressure to be camera-ready can elevate self-esteem issues, with the pressure of commenting on posts and with the rise of social media. It has a more competitive aspect, and that can really put the pressure on.”

THe nugget above is an example of what the author found to be a bad thing about selfies.  The idea of posting the right “selfie” on instagram and Facebook has led to an increase in poor self-esteem because we begin to ask ourselves , ” will people think this is a nice picture of me?” , ” what will people think about this picture?” , or “should i really put this picture up? It looks good to me but what if they disagree”.

Nugget 2: “So, if you’re doing a little more than documenting the moments of your life, and obsessing about your image seems to be taking over your life, what can you do to put things into perspective? “Make sure the focus is on the internal as much as the external,” says Weiner. “If all the images are fabricated to a degree, they’re not really showing life as it really is. Not all moments are perfect and model-ready. Enjoy your beauty, take that selfie, but be present for those memories while you’re taking the photo.”

This is when “inner beauty” comes in to play. Whats beautiful on the outside can only be described as true beauty if the inside is just as beautiful.  Being happy with yourself can help make your smile brighter so when you post that selfie, somebody can comment ” you have a really nice smile”. Tyra not only picks contestants that are pretty on the outside, but she also looks at their personalities too.

Link 2:

Catie. “Artifact Analysis I: Is America’s Next Top Model Bad for Self-Image?” Women In Pop Culture. WordPress, 1 Mar. 2013. Web. 11 July 2014.

Main claim: The author wants to point out and the effect that the show  “America’s Next Top Model” has on teens. There are more negative effects than positive because of the way they make people believe they have to look in order to become a model and how to truly be “beautiful”.

Nugget 1: “The show isn’t all bad, though. Tyra Banks, the producer of the show and main judge, is great at including diversity, such as women of all races, women with children, women with different sexual orientations, women with curves, and there was even a woman with Aspergers Syndrome included in the model contestants. It’s great, because Tyra is showing that any type of person can be a model.”

This was great to point out because the author felt the need to include the positive things about the show too. Tyra Banks is making it known on television that people of different colors, race, sexuality, mental state,  and social role can become a model …AS LONG AS YOU MEET THE JUDGING CRITERIA in order to get on the show. Tyra is doing a good way of showing that people come in unique shapes and forms.

Nugget 2: “The show also makes it seem like no matter what, the women competing are not good enough, thus making regular women watching the show feel even less beautiful. One way you can see this happening is in the makeover episode of each season. In the second or third episode, the girls have to go through with a makeover that is decided by the judges, to make them more like a model. The often go through hair color and style changes, but sometimes it’s too extreme. For example, giving an african american woman a perm to make her hair longer and smoother, when she is proud of her natural tight curls. The show gives off the vibe that no matter what you naturally look like, you can still look better. Photo-shoots also contribute to feeling like you need to look better, because the judges are so critical of the picture they choose.You mean to say, that when you ask the models to pose like murder victims there should still be warmth in their faces? It’s too extreme, and it seems like it can always be better in the judges eyes.”

This caught my attention because it broke down a specific act that the show, ANTM , takes part in within every season. Clearly stated “The show gives off the vibe that no matter what you naturally look like, you can still look better”. Everybody on the show was picked because they had the look that Tyra Banks and the other judges were looking for. SO the fact that they feel the need to tamper with the contestants’ natural beauty is sending a negative message to the viewers. They are beautiful, but a simple hair cut, color change, and some makeup will make you camera ready and better than before.

Link 3

Harris, Misty. “Feeling a Connection to Thin Celebrities Can Improve Women’s Self-image, Study Finds.” The Gazette (2012): H2. LexisNexis Academic. Web. 10 July 2014.

 

Main claim:  People feel less negatively effected by the display of thin people in the media if they share similarities.  Even the idea of sharing the same birthday as a thin celebrity or model, can help boost their self-esteem. There has been multiple studies and all of the experiments conducted and listed in her article show that this idea is true and can be proven.

 

Nugget 1: “Science has long had a bone to pick with skinny models, whose negative effect on women’s self-esteem is well documented. But a groundbreaking new study has uncovered an intriguing exception to the rule.When women feel a personal connection to a thin celebrity, researchers find they’re more likely to assimilate than to contrast. In other words, seeing their favourite slim star in a magazine actually gives their self-image a boost because they assume likeness – much the way spouses focus on the similarities, and not the differences, between them.”It may be that we don’t need to reject thin celebrities, but rather make women feel closer to them in order to allow these protective benefits,” says lead author Ariana Young, who reports her findings in the journal Social Psychological & Personality Science.It’s a controversial notion, to be sure. But across multiple experiments with some 150 college women, it consistently proved true that a “parasocial” (one-sided) relationship with a thin female star or model moderated the negative effects otherwise seen with skinny media figures.In the initial study, women who were led to believe they shared a birthday with an unknown thin model reported feeling better about their bodies after seeing her photo than those who didn’t perceive that similarity.A second study showed women were more satisfied with their bodies after exposure to their favourite thin celebrity than when exposed to a thin celebrity who was less liked.The final study suggested assimilation was the underlying mechanism behind the results of the previous experiments.According to Young, the message for magazines wanting to showcase slim women is that they can reduce the potential for harm by using models or stars who are widely admired by fellow females.”

The idea of sharing the smallest information about yourself with another model/celebrity can help boost your self-esteem when seeing them in the media; this is what caught my attention. This article and nugget is another counterargument and helps show another side of my topic. Seeing that displaying thin models and celebrities on television isn’t always a back thing,is interesting to know because many researchers have thought differently. I believe this is why so many people continue to watch ANTM because the contestants start off as regular people that viewers know.

SYNTHESIS : My first article focused on the pros and cons of “selfies”. It can be both helpful and harmful, depending on the person. But article three says the same thing about the idea of displaying thin models and celebrities in the media. This last article is another view to the idea that only displaying thin models on televisions can have an effect on people. In my research nugget 1 and 2 , both agreed that they had a negative effect on the people who interacted with social medias.

My second article focused on what the Show, ANTM, specifically had to offer and the effect it had on viewers. Mostly negative effects were stated within the article, because of how they deal with outer beauty. The only positive thing that was mentioned was the idea that Tyra selects people with unique differences, to take part in the show. She doesn’t discriminate but she believes that if she can “work her magic” everybody can end up looking the same on the outside.

 

Concept Experience #5

Facebook tinkered with users’ feeds for a massive psychology experiment

Facebook-logo-PSD

By William Hughes
Jun 27, 2014 3:30 PM
Scientists at Facebook have published a paper showing that they manipulated the content seen by more than 600,000 users in an attempt to determine whether this would affect their emotional state. The paper, “Experimental evidence of massive-scale emotional contagion through social networks,” was published in The Proceedings Of The National Academy Of Sciences. It shows how Facebook data scientists tweaked the algorithm that determines which posts appear on users’ news feeds—specifically, researchers skewed the number of positive or negative terms seen by randomly selected users. Facebook then analyzed the future postings of those users over the course of a week to see if people responded with increased positivity or negativity of their own, thus answering the question of whether emotional states can be transmitted across a social network. Result: They can! Which is great news for Facebook data scientists hoping to prove a point about modern psychology. It’s less great for the people having their emotions secretly manipulated.
________
In order to sign up for Facebook, users must click a box saying they agree to the Facebook Data Use Policy, giving the company the right to access and use the information posted on the site. The policy lists a variety of potential uses for your data, most of them related to advertising, but there’s also a bit about “internal operations, including troubleshooting, data analysis, testing, research and service improvement.” In the study, the authors point out that they stayed within the data policy’s liberal constraints by using machine analysis to pick out positive and negative posts, meaning no user data containing personal information was actually viewed by human researchers. And there was no need to ask study “participants” for consent, as they’d already given it by agreeing to Facebook’s terms of service in the first place.
________
Facebook data scientist Adam Kramer is listed as the study’s lead author. In an interview the company released a few years ago, Kramer is quoted as saying he joined Facebook because “Facebook data constitutes the largest field study in the history of the world.” It’s a charming reminder that Facebook isn’t just the place you go to see pictures of your friends’ kids or your racist uncle’s latest rant against the government—it’s also an exciting research lab, with all of us as potential test subjects.

HERE is a link to the video about Adam Kramer and his study.

facebook-news-feed-2012ff

Research #2

Link 1 :

Grabe, Shelly, L. Monique Ward, and Janet Shibley Hyde. “The Role of the Media in Body Image Concerns among Women: A Meta-analysis of Experimental and Correlational Studies.” Psychological Bulletin 134.3 (2008): 460-76. Google Scholar. Psychological Bulletin, 15 Jan. 2008. Web. 07 July 2014.

Main Claim : The authors’ main idea is to describe what they found to be the reason for poor self-image. Because of the fact that every where on media they are only displaying thin people on the social media site, magazines, and shows; the idea to be thin is the ideal thing and it is the only thing acceptable. This is the main reason why people have such a poor self-image because we are deeply connected to the media.

Nugget 1: “This ideal is pervasive, with fashion models, cartoon characters, movie and television actresses, Play- boy centerfolds, and Miss America Pageant winners all having become increasingly thinner over the past decades (Garner, Gar- finkel, Schwartz, & Thompson, 1980; Klein & Shiffman, 2005; Morris, Cooper, & Cooper, 1989; Silverstein et al., 1986; Spitzer, Henderson, & Zivian, 1999). Thus, media aimed at girls, adoles- cents, and young women are replete with extremely thin models that portray an ideal that is unattainable to most.”

This is extremely relevant to my topic because it is another source of evidence that proves that the media is trying to stick an image in teens’ head that it is only acceptable to be skinny. Yes, most people would rather be skinny than fat; but is it really what they initially wanted or did it become desire to be skinny after watching specific shows on television.

Nugget 2:”In this case, it is believed that the media’s consistent depiction of a thin ideal leads women to see this ideal as normative, expected, and central to attractiveness. However, because media presenta- tions of women’s bodies are so skewed, showcasing an ideal that is out of reach to most, adopting this reality may lead to decreased satisfaction with one’s own body”

By only showcasing skinny/ thin females on the media (specifically television shows) , the authors have claimed that the media has made the idea of being thin completely normal and anything else is abnormal. It is not an impossible idea/ goal to reach if they put in the effort but it does cause a lot of people to question if they look acceptable to society because of how they look, thanks to the media.

 

 

 Link 2:

Briggs, Helen. “‘Selfie’ Body Image Warning Issued.” BBC News. BBC News, 10 Apr. 2104. Web. 10 July 2014.

Main claim:  The more time people spend on a social network can contribute to how much of an effect the media has on their life and self-image.  Helen Briggs argues that “selfies” can harm a person’s self-image more than looking at professional model pictures because “selfies” are more personal. She believes that this contributes to the idea of comparing themselves to other “non-celebrities”.

Nugget 1: “She added: “The attention to physical attributes may be even more dangerous on social media than on traditional media because participants in social media are people we know.”These comparisons are much more relevant and hit closer to home. Yet they may be just as unrealistic as the images we see on traditional media.”

This caught my attention because it contradicted my idea of how ANTM could help improve teens’ self-image.  “selfies” could have more of a positive effect on teens rather than a negative because they are more personal pictures. They should enjoy seeing their friend’s “selfies” because it shows that their friends are comfortable in their skin. They shouldnt have to compare themselves to their friends.

 

Nugget 2: “A spokesperson for the Beat eating disorders charity said body image was a key part of our sense of identity and not a trivial matter or personal vanity. A preoccupation with weight and shape was one of the key features of current popular culture, and was a global phenomenon, she said.”The fascination with celebrities, their bodies, clothes and appearance has all increased the pressure that people typically feel at a time when they seek to establish their own identities and when their bodies are growing and changing,” she said”

This caught my attention because i agree 100 percent with this statement. Although it is new information to me, i can see why she stated this. People are trying to identify who they are and they can’t seem to do that without comparing themselves to what they see on the media because what they see on the media is what is acceptable to the world today. People are trying to find out who they in order to fit in somewhere.

 Link 3:

Dahl, Melissa. “Selfie-esteem: Teens Say Selfies Give a Confidence Boost.” TODAY. Today, 26 Feb. 2014. Web. 08 July 2014.

Main claim : The idea of a “selfie” has a variety of effects on teens but they are mostly positive effects. She argues that “selfies” are helpful with self-image because it allows teens to be in “control of their own world by allowing them to control the image of themselves”.

Nugget 1: “In the Ideal to Real TODAY/AOL Body Image survey, teenage girls revealed something unexpected: 65 percent said seeing their selfies on social media actually boosts their confidence. And 40 percent of all teens say social media helps “me present my best face to the world. “The TODAY/AOL findings echo emerging social science on the impact of social media on self-presentation and self-image. Selfies seem inconsequential or goofy, but they can actually be incredibly important to teenagers, because they give teens a way to control the image of themselves that they’re showing to the world, experts say.”

Selfies help teens identify themselves in the world. This is more evidence that “selfies” can help teens have a positive self-image rather than a poor self-image. They would rather look at pictures of themselves and personal, nonprofessional pictures of other people, because they know that celebrities are human too.

 

Nugget 2: “And that same idea is true with selfies. “Both clothing and selfies are useful tools for negotiating identity. As a result, you’ll find selfies that are really healthy and empowering as well as those that highlight how some youth are in pain,” says boyd. Still, for all that’s empowering about selfies, teens — especially young women — naturally have mixed feelings about them. As long as young people are in control of the image, they are confident. But, in the TODAY/AOL body image survey, they acknowledge social media’s power to make them feel bad about themselves, especially when confronted with glamorous, mostly happy, pictures of other people’s lives.”

Teens would rather see “selfies” of themselves and people their age, so they can know that there are other people trying to find their identity. Rather than see glamorous photos of the current or past models from ANTM. Although older generations may not see how much a “selfie” can positively impact a person’s self-image, it really has an important effect on teens.

 

SYNTHESIS : My first source was about the main reason why teens develop a poor self-image because of the media. Due to the fact that on the television shows, magazines, and the Facebook  & Instagram pages of certain shows that only display thin models and celebrities, it causes teens to look up to them and develop this idea that they have to look like them in order to be considered physically acceptable.

My second article contrasted tremendously with my third article,within the opinions about the “selfie”. My second article made an argument that “seflies” were harming teens’ self-image because they are comparing themselves to others on the media, specifically their friends. The third article argues that “selfies” are playing  an important role in teens’ lives by helping them build a more positive self-image, guid confidence, and help identify themselves.  After doing my research and truly reading all three articles, there are pros and cons when it comes to taking and posting “selfies” on the media, but there are mostly good outcomes when it comes to uploading “selfies”. Therefore, i am still leaning toward the idea of ANTM using personal “selfies” of the models on their social media pages.