Final Checklist

Final Checklist

Use the following list to plan your time for the remainder of the semester and to ensure that you have completed the final requirements by Friday, December 4 at 5 pm:

Let me know if you have any questions or need any assistance with these assignments.

Registering for UNIV 200

Please see these instructions and/or this video for information about how to register for UNIV 200. Note: the video is about registering for UNIV 112, but the process is exactly the same as for UNIV 200. You will register for my section of UNIV 200 at the same time you are currently taking UNIV 112. The chart below provides the appropriate CRNs (in blue) you will need to register:

UNIV 112 25638 16 Michael Abelson (P) TR 02:00 pm-03:15 pm UNIV 200 30 25143
UNIV 112 26204 33 Michael Abelson (P) TR 12:30 pm-01:45 pm

UNIV 200 66 27461
UNIV 112 31917 50 Michael Abelson (P) TR 09:30 am-10:45 am UNIV 200 83 29078
Please let me know if you have any difficulty or if you have any questions.

Feedback on U2 Dress Rehearsal Presentations

I have posted some brief feedback on your dress rehearsal presentations on Blackboard. You should know that this feedback is only offered to give you some sense of how you did – so long as you participated yesterday, this does not have any direct impact on your grade. For time’s sake, I won’t offer any other specific comments, but I would be happy to talk with you about the details of your presentation or paper if you come by my office.

If you received “Ready to finish” for Content, the key elements of the argument (Claim, Reason, (evidence), and counter-argument) were clearly stated, understandable, and reflecting synthesis. Additionally, these elements worked in service of a well-expressed and understandable “so what.”

If you received “OK, but needs development” for Content, the key elements of the argument (Claim, Reason, (evidence), and counter-argument) were in place, but the material stopped short of where it needed to go. May you needed to push for a clearer synthesis and/or a well-expressed and understandable “so what.”

If you received “A ways to go” for Content, the ideas are still need considerable work for a variety of possible reasons. Maybe you have evidence, but no over-arching claim. Maybe you have a claim, but it doesn’t reflect synthesis of all the required texts. Maybe you have a “so what” but not much else. There are other possibilities, but if you are in this camp you likely know why. If not, come and see me.

If you received “Ready to finish” for Delivery, your presentation was poised, clear, easy to understand, and engaging.

If you received “OK, but needs development” for Delivery, your presentation needed work in one or two of these areas: volume, clarity, engagement, preparation, or confidence.

If you received “A ways to go” for Delivery, the presentation needs a lot of work. Often this is a problem reflective of Content problems. It is very hard to give a confident presentation if you are winging it or don’t believe what you are saying. There are other possibilities, but if you are in this camp you likely know why. If not, come and see me.

“Imagine you enter a parlor.” Kenneth Burke

“Imagine you enter a parlor.” Kenneth Burke

Here’s the quotation I went over yesterday in class. I think it will be helpful for you to keep it mind both for your presentation and your paper:

“Imagine that you enter a parlor. You come late. When you arrive, others have long preceded you, and they are engaged in a heated discussion, a discussion too heated for them to pause and tell you exactly what it is about. . .  You listen for awhile, until you decide that you have caught the tenor of the argument; then you put in your oar. Someone answers; you answer him; another comes to your defense; another aligns himself against you, to either the embarrassment or gratification of your opponent, depending on the quality of your ally’s assistance. However, the discussion is interminable. The hour grows late, you must depart. And you do depart, with the discussion still vigorously in progress (110-111).”

 

Burke, Kenneth. The Philosophy of Literary Form: Studies in Symbolic Action, 3rd ed. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1973.