Big Eye Kabul. Surveillance blimps over Afghanistan

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Antonio Ottomanelli, Big Eye Kabul

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Antonio Ottomanelli, Big Eye Kabul

Every single day and every single night, rain or shine, the movements of people living in Kabul and Kandahar in Afghanistan, are watched over by huge surveillance balloons. The U.S. army calls them aerostat or Persistent Threat Detection System. From the ground you can almost forget they exist. Equipped with computers as well as infrared and color video cameras, the dirigibles are part of a network of drones and CCTV cameras that allow the U.S. to keep a close watch on the populations and even zoom in on specific locations to detect an suspicious individual or behaviour.

But officials value them for more than just surveillance. A 2012 Army “After Action Reportrecommends to fly the balloons “as much as possible, even if the camera systems/feed is broken. Work IO [Information Operation] messages that re-enforce the perception that [they] can see everything.”


In Kirsten Johnson’s The Above a U.S. military surveillance balloon floats on a tether above Kabul, Afghanistan

Antonio Ottomanelli: Kabul + Baghdad, an exhibition that opened last month in Turin’s new photography space Camera, shows a selection of blimp ‘portraits’ that photo reporter Ottomanelli took in Afghanistan.

Curator and researcher Joseph Grima writes: “In Kandahar City alone there are eight, and at least as many in the rest of the province; they say the insurgents call them frogs because their large eyes never stop staring. In Herat, they call them shameless because they peer indiscriminately at everything and everyone, men and women alike. In Helmand Province they’re often nicknamed Milk Fish: they languidly swim the skies propelled by small fins, and their milk skin stands out brightly against the blue of the sky. In Herat, during the torrid nights of the summer, couples no longer have sex on the rooftops under the stars.”

Check out the show if you’re in Turin in the coming weeks. The main exhibition at Camera at the moment is Bruden of Proof (which i previously saw in London and reviewed over here) but you’ll find the Kabul Big Eye photos in what the exhibition blurb calls ‘the Center’s monumental hallway’ which is basically the main corridor.

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Antonio Ottomanelli, Big Eye Kabul

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Antonio Ottomanelli, Big Eye Kabul

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Antonio Ottomanelli, Big Eye Kabul

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Antonio Ottomanelli, Big Eye Kabul

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Antonio Ottomanelli, Big Eye Kabul

Joseph Grima and Antonio Ottomanelli will be giving a talk on 10 March, 2016 at Camera: Kabul+Baghdad. Fotografare l’attualità: politica, progetto, rappresentazione.

Antonio Ottomanelli: Kabul + Baghdad is at Camera in Turin until 13 March 2016.

Help with adding motion detection!!

So I'm currently working on a project for university and I want to try adding motion detection using the webcam into my music visualisation just so that if it picks up movement the visualisation will get bigger or smaller. I have code that uses minim and beat detect to draw circles based on the beat, and I've found some basic code from the Learning Processing book about motion detection, its just combining the two that I'm having issues with. I can't put a simple link in as my code is drawing circles based on the beats in the song.

In my head I want to create a group of the circles being made by the beat detection, and apply the motion detection to that group. I'm not sure if this makes any sense, and I can show my code if it will help, I'm learning and I just thought I'd ask! All help or input is appreciated!!

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Anybody experienced in Processing willing to help a noob out with my code?

So I'm pretty new to programming in general and I've been having a bit of trouble with my code so far and heard that I can get some help and tips here. when you click on the green button it is suppose to show a number from 1-6. So what my code is suppose to do is depending on what number is shown is the amount of ellipses that appear on the bottom. Also for each different amount of ellipses that appears, a different color appears. I'm stuck on making a random amount of ellipses appear. So far all it does is make 6 appear when my mouse clicks on the button.

Here is the code I've been working on:

boolean button = false; float r; float g; float b; float a; int x = 300; int y = 25; int w = 75; int h = 50; void setup() { size(400,400); background (255); } void draw() { r = random(255); g = random(255); b = random(255); a = random(255); background(255); stroke(255); fill(1); ellipse(200,250,50,50); rect(175,50,50,150); fill(50,205,50); rect(300, 25, 75, 50); if (mousePressed) if (mouseX > x && mouseX < x+w && mouseY > y && mouseY < y+h) { button = true; } else { button = false; } if (button) { fill(255); rect(175,50,100,300); fill(30,144,255); ellipse (25,350,50,50); ellipse (95,350,50,50); ellipse (165,350,50,50); ellipse (235,350,50,50); ellipse (305,350,50,50); ellipse (375,350,50,50); } } 

Also, this is not part of the assignment but how can I make it so that it turns back off when I click the button? I used an else if statement, so right now it only shows the ellipses when I'm on the button but when I click back on the canvas off of the button it goes back, and I'd prefer to have it work how a button would actually work.

I appreciate any help and advise!

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Trying to make an automated turret

Hello, I am trying to create a castle defense game of sorts and would like to incorporate archery towers. I am very new to this program/language and am having no luck in figuring out how to create it.

I would like the tower to be able to automatically shoot at an approaching enemy if they are within a certain distance.

Any and all help with this would be greatly appreciated as I have been unable to find any tutorials online.

Thank you in advance!

edit: I am using processing 2.2.1

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Grafters: Industrial society in image and word

Burlers and menders, Scott Mills, 1948. Courtesy of Museums and Galleries, City of Bradford MDC
Burlers and menders, Scott Mills, 1948. Courtesy of Museums and Galleries, City of Bradford MDC

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Trafford Park, 1976. Courtesy of John Bulmer

Located in a former hydraulic pumping station in Manchester, the People’s History Museum fulfills the important role of recording the struggles and the lives of ‘ordinary’ people at home, work and leisure in Great Britain over the last 200 years. I’ve visited several of their exhibitions in the past and i’ve never seen anything dull, trivial nor indeed ordinary there. Besides, the PHM motto is probably the best a cultural space could brand itself with: Ideas Worth Fighting For.

The museum recently opened Grafters: Industrial society in image and word, a photo exhibition that explores how industrial workers went from objects in photos, to heroic representations of industry and finally to photographers themselves. From the 1840s, the early moments of photography and of the Industrial Revolution, through to the present day.

And as i was in town for Incidents of Travel in the Multiverse, the AL and AL show at HOME, there was no way i’d let this photo show escape me.

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“Grand Slam” Bombs awaiting delivery, 7 January 1945. Photo: Tyne & Wear Archives & Museums

In the early days of the Industrial Revolution, the working class received a rather measly attention. In the 1870s, the anonymous worker would be used as an easily recognizable unit of scale to fully illustrate the size and power of industry and its product.

“You know they’re there but they’re not really recognised”, curator Ian Beesley explained in an interview with Culture 24. “They were seen, to some extent, as disposable. We’ve got these pictures where they get a worker to stand in it so they’re just an anonymous unit of scale. One of the funniest ones we got, from Leeds, had a man next to a casting and just a note on the back saying ‘Fred was the smallest man in the foundry, so was always asked to stand next to new products because he’d make them look bigger.’

The other place where you could find photos of the workers at the time were in the mugshots made by the police to record people guilty of ‘larceny’. The practice followed Victorian theories that the shape of the head or hands of an individual reflected their criminal tendencies. This propensity to ignore the workers is an eloquent metaphor for the value that the elite of the 19th and early 20th century placed on the life of the ones they employed.

Over time, however, camera and photo processes became cheaper. The industrial workers started getting their own camera to document their lives and communities, providing thus an insider perspective on working class life.

That’s exactly what happened for Ian Beesley, the curator of the show. Beesley is now a leading documentary photographer but he used to work in factories. When he left school, the young man worked in a mill, hated it, found some work in a foundry, liked it very much but was made redundant because he was ‘too weak’ (his own words!) After that, he was employed in a textile manufacturing company, a furnace foundry and then ended up working on one of the last industrial steam railways in England.

While still working in industry, the artist felt there was a huge gap between the reality of the industrial north he was experiencing and the almost hygienic, PR-like images produced to portray it. He became interested in photography and started portraying his work colleagues and the factory life.

Mill girls, 1960. Courtesy of John Bulmer
Mill girls, 1960. Courtesy of John Bulmer

Cleaner, Lancashire and Yorkshire Railway Company, 1914-1918. Courtesy of Manchester Libraries, Information and Archives, Manchester City Council
Cleaner, Lancashire and Yorkshire Railway Company, 1914-1918. Courtesy of Manchester Libraries, Information and Archives, Manchester City Council

Grafters is a brilliant little show. Don’t miss it if you’re in or near Manchester this Spring. I enjoyed the exhibition because i’m particularly interested in the Industrial Revolution, in working class culture and in photography. But what makes the show remarkable is the way the museum, the curator and the poet Ian McMillan joined force to source some little known images and gave back some presence and dignity to individuals who, at the time some of these images were taken, had strong arms and strong legs but no names.

Images from the show:

Cleaners, Lancashire and Yorkshire Railway Company, 1917. Courtesy of Manchester Libraries, Information and Archives, Manchester City Council
Cleaners, Lancashire and Yorkshire Railway Company, 1917. Courtesy of Manchester Libraries, Information and Archives, Manchester City Council

Uniformed workers, London and North Western Railway Company, 1914-1918. Courtesy of Manchester Libraries, Information and Archives, Manchester City Council
Uniformed workers, London and North Western Railway Company, 1914-1918. Courtesy of Manchester Libraries, Information and Archives, Manchester City Council

Around the time of WWI, the group photograph of the workforce became more sophisticated, with photographers starting to create compositions that involved time, organisation and persuasion.

0Redundant tyre fitter McCormick’s Tractors, 2008. Courtesy of Ian Beesley
Redundant tyre fitter McCormick’s Tractors, 2008. Courtesy of Ian Beesley

During the closure of the McCormick’s factory in Doncaster, Ian Beesley asked the workers to tell him how they would like to be portrayed. The tyre fitter said: “I would like to be photographed in the tyre bay, in the middle of one of the biggest tyres, as this was the centre of my working life. I would like to be sat down, because that’s what I will be doing now I have been made redundant. Can you keep me in focus, but the background slightly out of focus as, that will represent my memory, all this will slowly go out of focus in my memory.”

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Ian Beesley, Spinner, Listers Mill, Bradford, 1984. From the series Through the Mill

Photos of newly arrived Asian and Caribbean workers at work are rare. It seems that some photographers were reluctant to visually record this development in Britain’s manufacturing sector.

Demolition men, Newcastle. Jimmy Forsyth, 1956. Courtesy of Tyne and Wear Archives and Museums
Demolition men, Newcastle. Jimmy Forsyth, 1956. Courtesy of Tyne and Wear Archives and Museums

George Wagstaff and his dog. Courtesy of Wakefield Council
George Wagstaff and his dog. Courtesy of Wakefield Council

Fairburn Lawson Combe & Barbour Ltd, 1940s. Courtesy of Leeds Museums and Galleries (Leeds Industiral Museum)
Fairburn Lawson Combe Barbour Ltd, 1940s. Courtesy of Leeds Museums and Galleries (Leeds Industiral Museum)

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Name: Eleanor Gardner
Arrested for: not given
Arrested at: North Shields Police Station
Arrested on: 19 February 1909
Photo Tyne and Wear Archives

Smoking chimneys, 1950s. Courtesy of Museums and Galleries, City of Bradford MDC
Smoking chimneys, 1950s. Courtesy of Museums and Galleries, City of Bradford MDC

Victoria Mustard workers, 1880s. Courtesy of Doncaster Heritage Services
Victoria Mustard workers, 1880s. Courtesy of Doncaster Heritage Services

Wigan pit brow lasses, 1880s. Courtesty of Chetham's Library
Wigan pit brow lasses, 1880s. Courtesty of Chetham’s Library

“Some of the early photo examples you get are of what you might call the exotic worker. Victorian gentlemen would collect these,” Beesley explains. “When they outlawed women and children working in mines there was an exception in the Lancashire coalfields, where women were allowed to work on the surface at pits, being known as pit-brow lassies.

The Victorian gentlemen had a little bit of a fascination with these working women and commissioned photographers to take portraits of them.”

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Jack Hulme, Fanny Morgan and her sister, Fryston. Photo Wakefield Council

Pendlebury tripe workers, 1890s. Courtesy of Manchester Libraries, Information and Archives, Manchester City Council
Pendlebury tripe workers, 1890s. Courtesy of Manchester Libraries, Information and Archives, Manchester City Council

Mills, Oldham, 1965. Courtesy of John Bulmer
Mills, Oldham, 1965. Courtesy of John Bulmer

Labourer, 1950. Courtesy of People's History Museum
Labourer, 1950. Courtesy of People’s History Museum

The image above was commissioned by the Labour Party to appear on a 1950 election poster. The photo celebrates Britain’s industrial force at a time when they had a huge electoral power. The photo illustrates the ‘Heroic Realism’ genre, a style of propaganda art that emerged in the Soviet Union and Germany in the 1930s. The visual style was later adopted by Western democracies. In Britain it continued throughout the 1950s in the rebuilding and reimagining of industry after WWII.

Land girl, 1940-1945. Courtesy of P G Hennell
Land girl, 1940-1945. Courtesy of P G Hennell

Study of two miners’ heads. Courtesy of People's History Museum
Study of two miners’ heads. Courtesy of People’s History Museum

Coal cutter. Courtesy of  the National Coal Mining Museum for England
Coal cutter. Courtesy of the National Coal Mining Museum for England

Miner, 1950s. Courtesy of  the National Coal Mining Museum for England
Miner, 1950s. Courtesy of the National Coal Mining Museum for England

Miners playing with their children, Fryston, 1940s. Courtesy of Wakefield Council
Miners playing with their children, Fryston, 1940s. Courtesy of Wakefield Council

The Black Country, 1961. Courtesy of John Bulmer
The Black Country, 1961. Courtesy of John Bulmer

Man cages made by Vickers Armstrong, 1936. Courtesy of Tyne and Wear Archives and Museums
Man cages made by Vickers Armstrong, 1936. Courtesy of Tyne and Wear Archives and Museums

Blakey's, 1950s. Courtesy of Leeds Museums and Galleries (Leeds Industrial Museum)
Blakey’s, 1950s. Courtesy of Leeds Museums and Galleries (Leeds Industrial Museum)

Building of the Manchester Ship Canal, 1887-1893. Courtesy of Chetham's Library 1
Building of the Manchester Ship Canal, 1887-1893. Courtesy of Chetham’s Library

Building of the Manchester Ship Canal, 1887-1893. Courtesy of Chetham's Library 2
Building of the Manchester Ship Canal, 1887-1893. Courtesy of Chetham’s Library

Building of the Manchester Ship Canal, 1887-1893. Courtesy of Chetham's Library 3
Building of the Manchester Ship Canal, 1887-1893. Courtesy of Chetham’s Library

Building of the Manchester Ship Canal, 1887-1893. Courtesy of Chetham's Library 4
Building of the Manchester Ship Canal, 1887-1893. Courtesy of Chetham’s Library

Grafters: Industrial Society in Image and Word runs at the People’s History Museum, in Manchester, until 14 August 2016.

Check out also this interview with Ian Beesley in Culture24: Grafters: Visions and Voices of Industrial Society offers amazing photos from the past at Manchester’s People’s History Museum.
Related story: For Ever Amber, ennobling working class and marginalized communities.

Kinect Particle Simple Open Ni

Hello I found this code in open processing and i want to modify it to draw same particles in kinect user map,i have tried different methods,does anyone have any idea?And also does any know what the float det() is in the end?Thanks in advance

The original code ` /** <p>Use mouse to control it. Use left button to organize it's movement, right to organize it's position. Scroll to change it's calmness</p> */

int n = 2000; // number of cells float bd = 30; // base line length float sp = 0.001; // rotation speed step float sl = .9; // slow down rate float bcg_color = 0; Cell[] all = new Cell[n]; public class Cell { float x, y; float x_start, y_start; float s = 0; // spin velocity float c = 0; // current angle Cell(float x, float y) { this.x=x; this.y=y; this.x_start = x; this.y_start = y; } void sense() { if (pmouseX != 0 || pmouseY != 0) s += log(sp * .5 * abs(det(x, y, pmouseX, pmouseY, mouseX, mouseY)) / (dist(x, y, mouseX, mouseY) + 1) + 1); s *= sl + 0.01; c += s; float d = bd * s + .001; stroke((50 + abs(d)*5)); line(x, y, x + d * cos(c), y + d * sin(c)); x = (x + (.5 * d * cos(c))); y = (y + (.5 * d * sin(c))); } void reset() { x = x_start; y = y_start; } } void setup() { size(1000, 600, P2D); // for full-size web: // size(window.innerWidth, window.innerHeight); int w = min(width - 300, 600); int h = min(height - 300, 400); for (int i = 0; i < n; i++) { // float xx = random(w) + (width - w)/2; // float yy = random(h) + (height - h)/2); all[i] = new Cell(random(w) + (width - w)/2, random(h) + (height - h)/2); } bcg_color = map(sl, .85, .99, 40, 0); } void draw() { // fill(max(min(1000 - millis()/10,255), bcg_color)); background(bcg_color); // text("Use mouse to control it. nUse left button to organize it's movement, nright to organize it's positionnScroll to change it's calmness", 100, 100); for (int i = 0; i < n; i++) all[i].sense(); } void mousePressed() { float c = random(0, 2*PI); if (mouseButton == LEFT) { for (int i=0; i<n; i++) all[i].c = c; } else { for (int i = 0; i < n; i++) all[i].reset(); } } void mouseWheel(MouseEvent event) { float e = event.getCount(); sl = max(min(sl + e/200, .99), .85); bcg_color = map(sl, .85, .99, 40, 0); } // for web scrolling /*void mouseScrolled() { if(mouseScroll > 0) { sl = max(min(sl + 1/200, .99), .85); bcg_color = map(sl, .85, .99, 40, 0); } else { sl = max(min(sl - 1/200, .99), .85); bcg_color = map(sl, .85, .99, 40, 0); } } */ float det(float x1, float y1, float x2, float y2, float x3, float y3) { return (float) ((x2-x1)*(y3-y1) - (x3-x1)*(y2-y1)); } 

My code ` class Cell {

 float x, y; float St_CellX, St_CellY; float s = 0;//spin velocity float c =0;//current angle float sp = 0.001; // rotation speed step float sl = .9; // slow down rate float bd = 30; // base line length Cell(float x, float y) { this.x=x; this.y=y; this.St_CellX = x; this.St_CellY = y; } float det(float x1, float y1, float x2, float y2, float x3, float y3) { return (float) ((x2-x1)*(y3-y1) - (x3-x1)*(y2-y1)); } void sense() { if (pmouseX != 0 || pmouseY != 0) s += log(sp * .5 * abs(det(x, y, pmouseX, pmouseY, mouseX, mouseY)) / (dist(x, y, mouseX, mouseY) + 1) + 1); s *= sl + 0.01; c += s; float d = bd * s + .001; stroke((50 + abs(d)*5)); line(x, y, x + d * cos(c), y + d * sin(c)); x = (x + (.5 * d * cos(c))); y = (y + (.5 * d * sin(c))); } void reset() { x = x_start; y = y_start; } } 

`

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