Category Archives: DIY

An open heart surgery of the legendary 4004 microprocessor

Created in 1971, Intel’s 4004 was the world’s first commercial microprocessor. It wasn’t particularly powerful though. Its main function was originally to perform simple mathematical operations in a mundane business calculator. However, it wasn’t the 4004 itself that was important but its architecture.


Quentin Destieu, À coeur ouvert, 2017. Photo: Luce Moreau. Installation view of the exhibition Master/Slave at Art-cade Galerie in Marseille, France


Quentin Destieu, À coeur ouvert, 2017. Photo: Luce Moreau. Installation view of the exhibition Master/Slave at Art-cade Galerie in Marseille, France

The 4004 offered a radical new way of thinking and building processors. General purpose computers used to be room-sized equipment but the miniaturization of the 4004 made it possible to commodify computing.

Another extraordinary thing about the 4004 is that it was the first and the last hand-drawn microprocessor. The production of its successors would be so complex that it would be automated, performed on a micro scale by hi-tech machines.

Nowadays it’s not just their technological complexity that leaves microprocessors outside of human understanding, their production itself is shrouded in secrecy, their architecture protected by patents. We’ve completely lost control over components that are at the core of every single connected object in our lives.

Artist Quentin Destieu hoped to reconquer that knowledge by re-creating and magnifying the inner architecture of the 4004 processor so that its size would lay bare its inner working. The objective of the project was also to create a technological support free of copyrights and working on an open source model. Which would have brought the technological understanding of electronics back into the commons (where it belongs.)

To achieve this de-miniutarization process, the artist first needed to go back to the initial drawings, recreate the plans and understand the circuits. With the help of engineers and artists (Bastien Vacherand, Sylvain Huguet, Guillaume Stagnaro, Grégoire Lauvin and many others) and using the plans made available by Intel in 2011, Destieu tried to recreate one by one the 2300 transistors of the 4004 processor. He quickly realized that much of the initial knowledge had been lost. Discussions on forum and with the engineers of the 4004 revealed that the know-how of the original plans was no longer fully mastered by a single person.


Quentin Destieu, À coeur ouvert, 2017. Photo: Luce Moreau. Installation view of the exhibition Master/Slave at Art-cade Galerie


Quentin Destieu, À coeur ouvert, 2017. Photo: Luce Moreau. Installation view of the exhibition Master/Slave at Art-cade Galerie

As a result, the sculptural form of À coeur ouvert (“at open heart” because, like an open heart surgery, the project aims to reach the vital organs of the processor) was guided by this conclusion that planned obsolescence had reached not just consumer electronics but also human knowledge itself.

The installation is made of 3 circuits that measure in total 1,90m by 80cm, the scale of a human body. The black colour echoes the fact that mainstream technology is now running from inside a inscrutable black box. The circuits are enclosed inside a kind of mausoleum that acknowledges the demise of our control over information technology.


Quentin Destieu, À coeur ouvert, 2017. Photo: Luce Moreau. Installation view of the exhibition Master/Slave at Art-cade Galerie


Quentin Destieu, À coeur ouvert, 2017. Photo: Luce Moreau. Installation view of the exhibition Master/Slave at Art-cade Galerie


Quentin Destieu, À coeur ouvert, 2017. Photo: Luce Moreau. Installation view of the exhibition Master/Slave at Art-cade Galerie


Quentin Destieu, À coeur ouvert, 2017. Photo: Luce Moreau. Installation view of the exhibition Master/Slave at Art-cade Galerie

If you’re curious about the work, do check out Master/Slave, Quentin Destieu solo show at Art-cade Galerie, Grands Bains Douches de la Plaine, in Marseille, until 15 December 2018.

Gambiologia magazine: “The gambiarra movement”

My recommendation for anyone who’s looking for something smart, exciting and FREE* to read during the coming Winter break: Facta Revista de Gambiologia #4 – Gambiologia magazine – “Gambiarra em movimento” / “The gambiarra movement”.

The 4th issue of Facta, the Gambiologia magazine has been out since October and i’m still waiting for my copy to snail its merry way through the reliably lethargic Italian postal ‘service.’ Fortunately, the editors have generously uploaded the full edition of the magazine online. Along with the previous Gambiologia publications. The texts are available in both Portuguese and English.

Gambiologia, you may remember, is the Brazilian art and science of kludging. Someone with gambiarrá displays a cunning ability to improvise, kludge, hack and make do with whatever is at hand. In the field of art, design, electronics and every other aspect of daily life and spheres of knowledge, gambiologia is the art of repurposing, recycling, reclaiming. Gambiologia, however, is far more than a demonstration of one’s own resourcefulness, it is also a political and ethical gesture. It questions industrial processes and mechanisms, rejects consumerism and postulates the need for greater personal and societal autonomy.


Guto Lacaz, Industrial coincidencias

This edition of the Gambiologia magazine is more introspective than the previous ones. It reflects on the work achieved so far and attempts to positions the practice in contemporary culture at large. The content of the publication is as fun and feisty as ever though. Inside Facta #4, you will find:

A reprint of the Repair Manifesto; a presentation of Garnet Hertz‘s collective zines Disobedient Electronic and Critical Making; a text by Newton C. Braga that charts the move from the hobbyist of the 20th to the maker of the 21st; an interview in which sociologist Laymert Garcia dos Santos talks about shamanism, acceleration and how the word ‘democracy’ as we use is in the West no longer makes sense; a portrait of Bernardo Riedel who builds sophisticated telescopes using bits and pieces from ice cream engines, sewing machine and chicken rotisserie shafts; a run though the basic of DIY tattooing when you have neither ink nor proper tattoo equipment. And much more.

I would, however, like to single out Ernesto Oroza‘s archives:


Household fan made from telephone components and vinyl LP records. Photo: Ernesto Oroza, via


Rikimbili: ‘Rikimbili’ bicycle fueled by a military tank engine, Havana, 2005. Photo by Ernesto Oroza

Over the past few years, Cuban designer Ernesto Oroza has been documenting ingenious objects that resist mainstream protocols. These artifacts of Technological Disobedience have their roots in Ernesto ‘Che’ Guevara’s call to workers to build their own machines. It was in 1961, the famous revolutionary was then Cuba’s Minister of Industry and he hoped to encourage Cuban workers and technicians to face the scarcity of resources by becoming experts in repair, reuse and re-invent.

The ideological push would become a way of life in the country. People would not only learn to repair and build their own machinery, they would also create toys, household items and vehicles using spare parts and trash.

*you can also buy a paper copy by emailing the editors.

Previously: Gambiologia, the Brazilian art and science of kludging, Facta – Gambiologia magazine #3. Hacker poetics, Magazines to make you forget that we’ve just entered the Dark Age: The Funambulist, Neural and Gambiologos, Magazines: Facta (the Gambiologia magazine), Neural and Aksioma brochures.

Gambiologia magazine: “The gambiarra movement”

My recommendation for anyone who’s looking for something smart, exciting and FREE* to read during the coming Winter break: Facta Revista de Gambiologia #4 – Gambiologia magazine – “Gambiarra em movimento” / “The gambiarra movement”.

The 4th issue of Facta, the Gambiologia magazine has been out since October and i’m still waiting for my copy to snail its merry way through the reliably lethargic Italian postal ‘service.’ Fortunately, the editors have generously uploaded the full edition of the magazine online. Along with the previous Gambiologia publications. The texts are available in both Portuguese and English.

Gambiologia, you may remember, is the Brazilian art and science of kludging. Someone with gambiarrá displays a cunning ability to improvise, kludge, hack and make do with whatever is at hand. In the field of art, design, electronics and every other aspect of daily life and spheres of knowledge, gambiologia is the art of repurposing, recycling, reclaiming. Gambiologia, however, is far more than a demonstration of one’s own resourcefulness, it is also a political and ethical gesture. It questions industrial processes and mechanisms, rejects consumerism and postulates the need for greater personal and societal autonomy.


Guto Lacaz, Industrial coincidencias

This edition of the Gambiologia magazine is more introspective than the previous ones. It reflects on the work achieved so far and attempts to positions the practice in contemporary culture at large. The content of the publication is as fun and feisty as ever though. Inside Facta #4, you will find:

A reprint of the Repair Manifesto; a presentation of Garnet Hertz‘s collective zines Disobedient Electronic and Critical Making; a text by Newton C. Braga that charts the move from the hobbyist of the 20th to the maker of the 21st; an interview in which sociologist Laymert Garcia dos Santos talks about shamanism, acceleration and how the word ‘democracy’ as we use is in the West no longer makes sense; a portrait of Bernardo Riedel who builds sophisticated telescopes using bits and pieces from ice cream engines, sewing machine and chicken rotisserie shafts; a run though the basic of DIY tattooing when you have neither ink nor proper tattoo equipment. And much more.

I would, however, like to single out Ernesto Oroza‘s archives:


Household fan made from telephone components and vinyl LP records. Photo: Ernesto Oroza, via


Rikimbili: ‘Rikimbili’ bicycle fueled by a military tank engine, Havana, 2005. Photo by Ernesto Oroza

Over the past few years, Cuban designer Ernesto Oroza has been documenting ingenious objects that resist mainstream protocols. These artifacts of Technological Disobedience have their roots in Ernesto ‘Che’ Guevara’s call to workers to build their own machines. It was in 1961, the famous revolutionary was then Cuba’s Minister of Industry and he hoped to encourage Cuban workers and technicians to face the scarcity of resources by becoming experts in repair, reuse and re-invent.

The ideological push would become a way of life in the country. People would not only learn to repair and build their own machinery, they would also create toys, household items and vehicles using spare parts and trash.

*you can also buy a paper copy by emailing the editors.

Previously: Gambiologia, the Brazilian art and science of kludging, Facta – Gambiologia magazine #3. Hacker poetics, Magazines to make you forget that we’ve just entered the Dark Age: The Funambulist, Neural and Gambiologos, Magazines: Facta (the Gambiologia magazine), Neural and Aksioma brochures.

Gamma Sense. Open, fast and free gamma radiation monitoring for citizens

The explosion of reactor number 4 at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant on 26 April 1986 was the most terrible nuclear accident the world had ever known. Soviet authorities, however, stayed silent on the disaster. Two days later and over 1,000 km away, an employee at the Forsmark nuclear plant in Sweden detected unusually high radiation, forcing the Soviet government to publicly acknowledge the tragedy.

Hopefully nothing remotely as catastrophic as the Chernobyl or the Fukushima disaster will ever happen again. However, if you live in the proximity of a nuclear power plant, you might want to have access to reliable data about any variation of radiation levels in your neighbourhood.


Making Sense: Measuring radiation together workshop in Bergen op Zoom. Image Waag Society


Making Sense: Measuring radiation together workshop in Bergen op Zoom. Image Waag Society

The developers of GammaSense believe that citizens should have at home the tools and means to monitor radiation levels. Immediately, inexpensively and with a fair level of accuracy.

The team found out that it is possible to use devices with a CCD or CMOS-based camera as gamma-detectors. Research by the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation has indeed demonstrated a correlation between the amount of gamma radiation and the number of white spots and streaks that appear in photos taken by phone which cameras have been covered with black tape.

The aim of the GammaSense project is to develop an open emergency-infrastructure that can be deployed within minutes, using only your laptop or smartphone and a piece of black tape.

When you cover your camera with a piece of aluminum foil, which is covered with black tape, you can start measuring. Cameras and webcams can thus capture the Gammas radiation and convert them into one unit per minute. This allows large increases to be captured and plotted on a map.


Making Sense: Measuring radiation together workshop in Bergen op Zoom. Image Waag Society

The experimental platform is still in development and being tested through a series of workshops with citizens, experts and policy officers who live in the vicinity of a nuclear plant. The workshops are also organized in cooperation with municipalities, RIVM (The Netherlands’ National Institute for Public Health and the Environment), WISE International (a NGO that is campaigning for cleaner energy since 1978) and Waag Society (the motor behind the project.)

GammaSense is the third Amsterdam-based pilot of Making Sense, a CAPS project with participating pilots in Barcelona, Pristina and Amsterdam. Making Sense’s key objective is to empower people with technology that allows them to get a more hands-on understanding of their immediate environment. Next to awareness on the topic, it will show the potential of citizen-driven data collection, which eventually leads to people making more informed decisions on behavior in their environment.

The pilot version of the radiation monitoring tool is available at www.gammasense.org


Making Sense: Measuring radiation together workshop in Bergen op Zoom. Image Waag Society

I asked René Post and Ivonne Jansen-Dings from the Waag Society in Amsterdam to tell us more about GammaSense:

Hi Ivonne and René! I’m surprised at how simple measuring gamma radiation is. I just open the GammaSense page, put black tape on my webcam and that’s it. Or did i miss something? Is it magic? How can it be that simple? Where do you get the data for the measurements?

No, you are completely right, that is it. It is known since 5-6 years that gamma rays produce white dots on CMOS-based cameras. By completely covering the eye of the camera with black tape, all visible light is blacked out. The remaining light that is registered by the camera, is a combination of faulty pixels (degeneration over time) and background noise. This background noise normally consists of a very low level of natural gamma radiation. Since you can look at gamma rays as supercharged light particles, anything less then centimeters of lead will not stop them. So the black tape means nothing to the gamma rays, and functions like a filter to block out all other forms of light.

With a base-measurement, it is possible to measure the combination of the degradation of the camera and the background noise. When we have that value, and we see sharp increases of white dots, we know it must be due to what we call ‘man-made radiation’.

What the gammasense-platform is doing, is counting the white dots per image from the video- stream, and from that we calculate a ‘counts per minute’: the number of occurrences per minute. This is exactly what the traditional measuring device for gamma radiation, a Geiger-Müller tube, is doing. So by a completely different (digital) route, we have measured something that could only be done before by the analogue Geiger-Müller tubes.

The advantages of this method are that the sensors are already in our homes on the day that they might be useful. The disadvantages, are that the sensitivity of the webcam is lower compared to standard measuring devices. Several labs have performed comparative research and they showed that the usefulness of the mechanism is actually quite good, and seems to be more dependent on the quality of the formulas that are implemented to analyze the stills.

In the project, we aim for a long-term collaborative strategy, by open innovation on Github. We have compiled a first version that runs on Chrome and are in the process now of releasing the formula that comes out of analyzing the results from data-dumps we have performed at the nuclear lab of the RIVM in Bilthoven, the Dutch official institute for environmental research.

Gammasense.org is the first website on the Internet that makes it possible to measure gamma radiation directly, without installing an app. As underlying protocol, we rely on WebRTC.

Another unique feature is that apart from the site and formula, the data is open as well. The idea is that when something happens in say France in 2021, people can instantly copy the files and begin to mobilize their local environment to join in the measurements. Institutions can jump in, and do calibrations for certain types of phones, which will make it very easy to interpret sections of the data because they all used gammasense.org to upload their data.


Making Sense: Measuring radiation together workshop in Bergen op Zoom. Image Waag Society


Making Sense: Measuring radiation together workshop in Bergen op Zoom. Image Waag Society

In one of the blog posts you write “Information about incidents concerning nuclear radiation usually takes around 3 days to reach citizens.”I had no idea it took such a long time. Do you know why citizens are not informed faster?

It is an combination of bureaucracy, fear of causing panic, unavailability of facts, cross-border communication etc.

Won’t people obsess and worry too much whenever they notice small discrepancies in measurements from one day to another or from on street to another? Aren’t you afraid of spreading paranoia? Of seeing people desert certain areas of a city?

We do have a responsibility to deliver a useful tool. So the relatively large measurement error forces us to be really careful with statements. If ‘1’ is OK, then ’10’ means something could be happening, ‘100’ something is surely happening and ‘1000’ please leave the area. That is why we need to do this together with the institutions that are already responsible for delivering the kind of data on a daily basis to the authorities and the public.


Making Sense: Measuring radiation together workshop in Bergen op Zoom. Image Waag Society


Making Sense: Measuring radiation together workshop in Bergen op Zoom. Image Waag Society

By now, i think you’ve done workshops in the cities of Bergen op Zoom, Eindhoven and Maastricht. Are these events just about demo-ing the technology and showing people to use it? Could you describe what happens during the workshops?

The workshops were intended as co-creation sessions, and to some extend they functioned that way. We quickly learned though that at first we assumed way too much knowledge: in the first workshop we had an audience that for a large part didn’t have the faintest idea what gamma radiation could be. Something to do with wifi or smartphones, was the general feeling. What a nuclear power plant was, what it produced and why, most people in the room had no idea. So we did get some usable feedback, but the phrase co-creation was not at all times completely justified. But in another way, it made it very clear to us that this is the level of knowledge that we need to adapt the tool to.


Making Sense: Measuring radiation together workshop in Bergen op Zoom. Image Waag Society


Making Sense: Measuring radiation together workshop in Bergen op Zoom. Image Waag Society

How do people react? Do you feel that citizens have different concerns from one city to another? Different levels of awareness?

In some cities, like Bergen op Zoom (in the vicinity of the nuclear power plant in Doel) and Maastricht (not too far from the plant in Tihange), there was much more awareness compared to Eindhoven, which is a bit further away.

Since the tool was still in its infancy, we had more theoretical discussions. The fact that the RIVM and WISE International were there as well to present their take on the matter greatly helped the trust people had in the project that Waag Society was carrying out.

What can people do with the knowledge acquired through the workshops? What happens after the workshop?

We hope the workshops strengthen a DIY-mentality and raise awareness of the fact that when we need data, we can quickly organize ourselves and generate it together. People are being kept informed through our newsletter on the progress of the tool. For instance, with the incorporation of WebRTC into iOS coming september, all iPhones will be able to run the tool as well.


Urban AirQ


Urban AirQ

This project is the third Amsterdam-based pilot of the Making Sense program, could you sum up briefly what the previous pilots were about?

The first pilot was aimed at DIY air-quality measurement with civilians who lived on certain streets in Amsterdam that were among the most polluted in the Netherlands.

The second pilot was called Smart Kids Lab, where schoolchildren where shown how to measure their environment with very simple means. Examples where the acid in water-meter and the particulates meter for fine dust particles in the air.

Thanks Ivonne and René!

Related stories: The Nuclear Culture Source Book, Anecdotal radiations, the stories surrounding nuclear armament and testing programs, La Cosa Radiactiva / The Radioactive Thing, Sounds From Dangerous Places: Sonic Journalism and After The Flash. Photography from the Atomic Archive.

Disobedient Electronics: Protest

I find myself the very lucky and very pleased recipient of the Disobedient Electronics booklet edited and hand-crafted by Garnet Hertz.


Disobedient Electronics. Photo by Garnet Hertz

The booklet’s manifesto calls for more design (or art) that gets out of the sleek graduation shows and galleries, confronts sociopolitical issues head-on and bites back. As he sums up, “Design can be how to punch Nazis in the face, minus the punching.” Hertz isn’t afraid to ruffle a few feathers when he writes in his intro to the publication that:

1. Building electronic objects can be an effective form of social argument or political protest.
2. DIY, maker culture and local artisinal productions can have strong nationalist and protectionist components to them – in some senses, populism can be seen as the rise of the DIY non-expert.
3. Critical and Speculative Design (Dunne & Raby) are worthwhile approaches within industrial design, but perhaps not adversarial enough to reply to contemporary populist right-wing movements (Brexit, Trump & Le Pen). Questions like “Is it moral to punch Nazis in the face?” should be answered with smart alternatives to violence that are provocative pieces of direct action.
4. If we are living in a post-truth time, we should focus on trying to make progressive arguments and facts more legible and engaging to a wide and diverse audience.
5. The fad of ‘Maker Culture’ is over. Arduinos and 3D printers are fascinating things, but the larger issues of what it means to be a human or a society needs to be directly confronted.

A few months ago, Hertz issued a call for submissions and published some of the most inspiring answers he received. Some are works i was familiar with (but always happy to find again in new context and with new texts written by the artists/activists/designers) such as the Abortion Drone by the ever brilliant Women on Waves (& Collaborators), Julian Oliver‘s Transparency Grenade, Román Torre and Ángeles Angulo’s Thero device that allows you to physically manage your data traffic, Eizo Ishikawa and Tamon Sawangdee’s Tamon CRAF, the paperplane machine for protests , I.E.D. (Improvised Empathetic Device) by Matt Kenyon and Doug Easterly, the Barbie Liberation Organization generously offers a Barbie/G.I. Joe home surgery manual, the Institute for Applied Autonomy‘s Robotic Graffiti Writer, etc.


Annina Rüst, A Piece of the Pie Chart. Photo via Unframed

I also discovered some smart ideas and projects that were completely new to me. There’s Annina Rüst’s A Piece of the Pie Chart, a feminist food robot that visualizes the gender gap in art and tech on edible pies. Or The 79% Work Clock that sounds an alarm 79% of the way through the work day to remind us that after a certain time of the day, women stop being paid for their work. Neil MacAloney’s description of Phantom Kitty, a (work in progress) device that would turn on whenever you’re not using the computer, sounds very promising. The tool would perform online searches and open websites, throwing in a vast amount of misinformation into internet tracking activity, rendering data gathering pointless.


Pedro G. C. Oliveira and Xuedi Chen, Backslash (ROUTER. Off-Grid Network)

The works i found most interesting were Pedro G. C. Oliveira and Xuedi Chen’s Backslash, a series of open source functional devices that help activists communicate during a network blackout. I was also very impressed with the Automated Doorbell and Decorative Wreath made by with the Feminist Maker Space at the University of Texas in protest of Campus Carry, a law that provides that license holders may carry a concealed handgun throughout university campuses.


Matt Walker, Device for the Emancipation of the Landscape

There are more projects in the book (all dutifully listed on the webpage of Disobedient Electronics) but i’d like to end with the one i found most touching: Matt Walker’s Device for the Emancipation of the Landscape. This sound-cannon collects sounds from the surrounding landscape through its “mouth.” The field-recordings are then mixed and projected back into urban or industrial sites, opening up the space of authority and offering an opportunity to reflect on both the human impact and treatment of landscape.


Disobedient Electronics: Protest (Pre-production Proof – version 2017 April 28)

I love the booklet: the hand-made format, the colour, the whole impetus behind its creation, most of the works included (or rather i love ALL of the works included, i just felt that some of them were only scratching on the surface and wouldn’t reach anyone beyond the usual art/activist audiences). Disobedient Electronics is a great starting point for a much-needed discussion about how art, design and creative practices in general can challenge issues such as homophobia, sexism, racism, economic inequalities, political status-quo, etc. I think that in general media art and interactive design are far too complacent when it comes to creating socially-engaged works. Too often, the projects are more about getting some attention from bloggers and festival curators and less about directly getting to grips with a specific issue. Or reaching out to the ‘general’ public.

I would love more publications like Disobedient Electronics, with artists from other parts of the world for example. If Hertz makes another issue, i’ll definitely send something.

There are only 300 copies of the booklet available, if you feel you can contribute in any way to the project, Hertz might send you one of the last copies for free…


Disobedient Electronics. Photo by Garnet Hertz


Disobedient Electronics. Photo by Garnet Hertz


Disobedient Electronics. Photo by Garnet Hertz


Disobedient Electronics. Photo by Garnet Hertz

Previously: Critical Making and an Interview with Garnet Hertz.

GAMERZ: Digital tech ‘degenerated’ by craft and kludge


Trailer for the 12th edition of the GAMERZ festival

I’ve attended a fair number of editions of the GAMERZ festival over the years. The event seems to have found a formula that works, developed a personality of its own while always bringing to light new artists, perspectives and ideas that surprise me. Some of the performances are a bit mad and frenzied, a bit raw and totally at odds with the sleek and efficient aesthetics and atmosphere of many other media art festivals. And that’s why GAMERZ remains one of my favourite art appointment of the year.

Under its laid-back guise, GAMERZ is also sharp and subversive. It uses games, interactions and sounds as vehicles to observe a society re-shaped by technology and a technology challenged by artists and hackers.


Tapetronic aka Alexis Malbert performance at GAMERZ. Photo by Luce Moreau


Yann Leguay, Stück für Stöcke

This year, the festival was organized around two fairly different themes. Simulated Universe, curated by Ewen Chardronnet and D. Générer, curated by Quentin Destieu.

Today, I’m going to focus on D. Générer, an exhibition and series of performances that explored the aesthetic peculiar to the kind of “digital” artworks that is guided by craft, kludge and a rowdy DIY spirit. These works are (de)generated by the touch of the human hand. They don’t have the efficient and polished aesthetic of design products, but they have soul, vigor and warmth.

“Researchers an theoreticians have already demonstrated the role of art & science-inspired aesthetics in the service of innovation and industry,” Destieu writes. “But they tend to underestimate the alternative and subversive aesthetic potential of these artistic forms, reducing them to default prototyping. Contrary to American historian Fred Turner’s dearest « makers » movement, in which innovating prototypes are to be eventually re-designed to be mass-made and sold, artists claim a different end to their works.”

Each work selected for the show champions an ‘alternative’ aesthetic that values the glitches of the process and the imperfection of technology. Perhaps even more interestingly, these works present themselves as a kind of anti-Apple squad, they open up their guts and show the mechanisms that brings them to life. By doing so, they suggest that there is an alternative to our passive-impassive consumer attitude and that now has come the time to reconnect with the objects that surround us (no matter how high-tech or low-tech they are) and make them our own:

A quick look at some of the artworks:

Yann Leguay, Arnaud Rivière and Jérôme Fino, DIRECT OUT. Sound experiments in the streets of Mulhouse (France) during the Météo music festival

Arnaud Rivière, DIRECT OUT

Direct Out takes sound creation and sound distribution outside of the concert halls, galleries and other traditional venues for music. The artists behind the work, Yann Leguay, Arnaud Rivière and Jérôme Fino, DIYed their own instruments by repurposing existing gadgets and materials. They then walked around the city looking for street furniture, trees and objects that would make their autonomous modules beep, buzz and resonate. By hooking up onto existing infrastructure, the small devices adopt a parasitic behaviour but they do so while remaining low-key and unobtrusive. They never not attempt to compete with the existing soundscape. Instead, they quietly capture and reveal the untapped energy and confidential vibrations of the urban environment.

If you read french, poptronic has a great write-up of the work.


salle

Yann Leguay, Stück für Stöcke


Yann Leguay, Stück für Stöcke

With Stück für Stöcke, Yann Leguay replaced with a piece of wood the tablets and phones held by game players in youtube videos. All that remains is the player’s finger gestures. The removal of the usual visual references reminds us of that interfaces are of little use without our own movements. Something that has always been clear to a tech industry obsessed with identifying every single gesture that can be patented and monetized.

Tapetronic aka Alexis Malbert, Scratchette demo 2016


Tapetronic aka Alexis Malbert, Scratchette. Photo by Luce Moreau


Tapetronic aka Alexis Malbert, Scratchette. Photo by Luce Moreau

Scratchettes! The kind of work that cheers me up!

Since 1999, Tapetronic aka Alexis Malbert has been subverting, dissecting and transforming audio tapes, tape-recorders and other ‘old school’ devices into nifty little music machines. His instruments are as bizarre and charming as a ‘turntable’ for cassette tapes, a music sex toy vibrator or a Walkman on wheels. It’s about hacking, creating new sounds with old ones, but also about giving new life and purposes to bits and pieces of metal and plastic that could otherwise have been discarded:

“We’re not obliged to stay abreast with the new developments that big industries thrust on us,” he told Motherboard. “We can transform what already exists so that we can live a new experience.”

Tapetronic DJing his tape settings during GAMERZ. The most important part of his noisemaking art is not so much the K7 itself but the magnetic fields that can be scratched like vinyl:


Tapetronic aka Alexis Malbert performance at GAMERZ. Photo by Luce Moreau


Tapetronic aka Alexis Malbert performance at GAMERZ. Photo by Luce Moreau


Tapetronic aka Alexis Malbert performance at GAMERZ. Photo by Luce Moreau

I think i need to warn you about what comes next. It’s Windows 93 and it’s wild!


Windows 93 at GAMERZ festival. Photo by Luce Moreau


Windows 93 at GAMERZ festival. Photo by Luce Moreau


Windows 93 at GAMERZ festival. Photo by Luce Moreau

Artists Jankenpopp and Zombectro‘s spoof project imagines what could have happened if Microsoft hadn’t skipped a step between Windows 3.X and Windows 95.

The Moss and Roy of French art made a rather convincing parody of an early version of Windows, complete with a 8-bit version of Solitaire called Solitude, silly silly keyboard music, a cat explorer, songs for potatoes, a bit of always on trend GIFs, and icons you’re not sure you should be clicking on.

The speed is not what i would call optimal and as i wrote above, it’s proper bonkers. But also very clever and hilarious, even if you’re everything but a geek and you might not get all the references and innuendos

For the GAMERZ festival, the artists gave a 3rd dimension to their hallucinating pixelated online world and turned it into an installation that takes the form of ’90s cyber-café. It was interesting to watch people sit down and play with the operating system. What i found most curious was that it seemed to appeal to children, teenagers and middle age guys. Some stayed there for the nostalgia factor, others might have been attracted by the (intentional) dysfunctions refreshingly at odds with everything that is meant to make today’s mainstream ‘user experience’ seamless and pleasant.


Benjamin Gaulon, ReFunct Modular. Photo by Luce Moreau for GAMERZ


Benjamin Gaulon, ReFunct Modular. Photo by Luce Moreau for GAMERZ


Benjamin Gaulon, ReFunct Modular. Photo by Luce Moreau for GAMERZ

Refunct Modular is a wall-mounted version of Benjamin Gaulon’s ReFunct Media project. It uses a set of modules, each one connecting to the next using custom made connectors, they share power (5 and 12v), audio signal, video signal and spare lines for misc connections.

The sculpture hacks and repurposes discarded electronic devices, both digital and analogue, combining them into a complex chain of interconnected elements. The possible configurations and appearances of the final sculptures seem to be limited only the artist’s impulses and imagination.

ReFunct Modular doesn’t pretend to be an answer to the questions raised by e-waste, planned obsolescence and lack of sustainable design strategies. Rather, as an installation it experiments and explores unchallenged possibilities of ‘obsolete’ electronic and digital media technologies and our relationship with technologies and consumption.


Benjamin Gaulon, KindleGlitched*. Photo by Luce Moreau for GAMERZ


Benjamin Gaulon, KindleGlitched*. Photo by Luce Moreau for GAMERZ

KindleGlitched* is a work that explores the (so far grossly neglected) aesthetics of Planned Obsolescence. The work is a series of glitched kindles donated, found or bought on eBay. They have stopped working and would have ended up on a dump somewhere in Ghana if the artist hadn’t seen their singular beauty, signed them and sold them on Amazon as an insolent gesture of Retail Poisoning.


Reso-nance Numérique, Chimères Orchestra at GAMERZ festival


Reso-nance Numérique, Chimères Orchestra. Photo by Luce Moreau


Reso-nance Numérique, Chimères Orchestra. Photo by Luce Moreau

Chimères Orchestra are drummer-robots that hook onto urban structures. The metallic creatures play with the sonic capabilities of the built environment by drumming onto them with their little legs. The work is playful but also a bit mysterious and worrying. The creatures live above your head, dance with a mind that seems to be their own and seem to combine traditional percussion with coding mechanic with surprising ease. If simple machines can already exploit our architectures and music traditions now, imagine how robots will surpass and humble human creativity in the near future!

Albedo Dreams. Experiments in DIY climate manipulation

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Mari Keski-Korsu, Albedo Logger (part of Albedo Dreams)

Albedo is the measure of the “whiteness” of a surface and its ability to reflect the sunlight. When applied to the Earth, the albedo effect is a measure of how much of the Sun’s energy can be reflected back into space. Sophisticated, large-scale goeengineering research projects are looking into ways to efficiently do that and thus manipulate climate and put the brake on global warming.

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Mari Keski-Korsu, Albedo Dreams Rock Bed, part of Albedo Dreams in Reykjavik, Iceland, 2013. Photo

Since 2012, artist Mari Keski-Korsu has been looking into the DIY strategies that citizens could deploy in order to manipulate climate. She discovered a research paper from engineers at Concordia University who estimated that if cities all over the world increased their surface albedos by adopting white rooftops and light-colored pavements, the global cooling effect generated would be the equivalent of reducing CO2 emissions by 25–150 billion tonnes.

What if citizens joined forces and geoengineered climate on a small scale, both in forests and urban areas? Could they have an impact on the climate without ever needing to resort to costly innovations? Just by using kites, suits for men and semi-domestic forest animals, car covers and other low/no tech guerrilla interventions?

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Mari Keski-Korsu, Reindeer in albedo suit (Stuffed reindeer, recycled textile and mosaics.) At Prima Materia exhibition, 2012

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Mari Keski-Korsu, Albedo Dreams Kites flying in Reykjavik, Iceland. Photo: Asgerdur G. Gunnarsdottir, 2013

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Mari Keski-Korsu, Albedo Logger (part of Albedo Dreams)

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Mari Keski-Korsu, Albedo Logger (part of Albedo Dreams)

Keski-Korsu was showing one of her DIY strategies in climate change at the HYBRID MATTERs exhibition which closed a few days ago at Forum Box in Helsinki. This one was a video work showing a suit prototype for forest loggers (i could not embed the video but you can watch it here.) The albedo suit is designed to increase the sunlight reflectivity and thus the albedo value of the forests, cooling the climate in the process while allowing the logger to work as usual. The suit even features a stunning white cape that can be spread out during work breaks and rolled up on the back afterwards.

Of course covering the surface of the Earth in whiteness is all a bit absurd (even though i’m sure Trump would think that a whiter world is the way to go) but that’s why the project echoes with so much sharpness and irony the current research in climate manipulation. Ongoing geoengineering projects often display the typical human hubris that assumes that the best way to save the world is by deploying more technology, more innovation, more energy-devouring ‘solutions.’ And not by taking the problem at its roots: by reflecting on our unruly use and abuse of the planet, by trying to show more respect to all the living entities that populate it.

Albedo Dreams started as a collaboration, organised with the help of Bioart Society and HENVI – Helsinki University Centre for Environment, with forest researchers Frank Berninger and Nea Kuusinen.

Mari Keski-Korsu is collecting all her research and findings in do-it-yourself climate manipulation on her Albedo Dreams website.

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Albedo hut village after a children workshop at the Children Cultural Centre Lastu in Lapinlahti, Finland, 2013

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Albedo Dreams “whitening actions” in Reykjavik, Iceland in February 2013. Photo

The Albedo Logger video was screened at the HYBRID MATTERs exhibition at Forum Box in Helsinki. The show was part of the HYBRID MATTERs Nordic art&science network program which investigates the convergence of our environment with technology and essentially the intentional and unintentional transformation of our planet through human activity. The program took the form of a series of researches, encounters, art commissions, exhibitions and a symposium. I got the chance to attend the symposium and to visit the final exhibition. More episodes about the whole event coming soon!

Previously: HYBRID MATTERs: The urks lurking beneath our feet and The Christmas tree, your typical postnatural organism.

Destructables, DIY for protest and creative dissent

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GMO Food Warning Labels

I’ve just started working on a new talk i’ll be giving in the coming days at the Art Activism Easter School. The theme is the dissemination of artistic/activist practices. During my research, i discovered a brilliant resource for DIY projects of protest and creative dissent. It’s called Destructables and it was started by one of my heroes: Packard Jennings. He of the Anarchist Action Figure and outrageous Business Reply pamphlets.

Destructables is a website packed with recipes for protest, subversion, hijacking and disruption. The target are superstores, banks, police, corporate villains, etc. Some of these DIY instructions might come in handy nowadays. They go from The Center for Tactical Magic‘s guide to hold up a bank to Jennings’ Chemical Bananas sticker that denounce the use of carcinogenic pesticides by banana companies, to a guide to stealing from your employer (if your employer happens to be a bank), to a booklet in which the Billboard Liberation Front (BLF) shows you how to ‘improve’ billboards, to Lucas Murgida‘s tutorial of how to drill open a standard door lock, to Copwatch‘s downloadable pamphlets to discourage/attempt to stop police brutality and harassment.’ And lots more.

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Packard Jennings, Bible Stickers

My favourite DIY are the Bible Stickers that you can download and give to your friends with the instruction to stick them to the inside jacket of the Bible you will find in your hotel room. The sticker reads: “This Bible contains material on creationism. Creationism is a parable, not a fact, regarding the origin of living things. This material was written by normal men almost two thousand years ago and should be approached with an open mind and critically considered.”

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Packard Jennings, Pocket Survival Guide

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Packard Jennings, Walgreens Local Business Coupon

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The Freedom Fighter’s Manual, 1983

Destructables also features historical documents such as a US military instructional booklet to explain how to load and drop a propaganda bomb (World War II), an ‘How to Surrender’ US propaganda leaflet (Gulf War, 1991), The Freedom Fighter’s Manual dropped by the CIA over Nicaragua in 1983 to invite citizens to cause civil disorder, an Egyptian Guide to Revolution (with translation) designed to arm Egyptian protestors with practical advice (1991), the PDF of the Demonstrations chapter from Abbie Hoffman‘s 1971 Steal This Book, etc.

Prototype II (after US patent no 6545444 B2) or the quest for free energy

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Nick Laessing Prototype II (after US patent no 6545444 B2 by John Bedini), Talk Radio with John Bedini (excerpts from 1980s radio show Open Mind), 2009

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Nick Laessing Prototype II (after US patent no 6545444 B2 by John Bedini), Talk Radio with John Bedini (excerpts from 1980s radio show Open Mind), 2009

A few years ago, artist Nick Laessing stumbled upon a book in a second-hand bookshop. Titled The Search of Free Energy, the publication introduced him to the world of people who are searching for alternatives to fossil fuel as a source of energy.

The artist went on to meet and interview some of the scientists, inventors, self-taught engineers and amateurs who are looking for ways to produce free energy. What fascinates Laessing are the utopian ideals that inspire these ‘fringe’ scientists but also the subculture surrounding overlooked inventions and the intrinsic sculptural qualities of some of the prototypes developed by these communities of inventors.

To explore with more depths the work of these enthusiasts, the artist started making his own copies of the machines. He is showing one of these devices at the moment in the exhibition The Promise of Total Automation at Kunsthalle Wien. It’s a brilliant, thrilling show and i’ll get back with a more detailed review of it in the coming days.

The ‘free energy’ generator exhibited in Vienna was modeled on a patent filed by an American inventor called John Bedini for a motor that is supposed to be able to recharge its own batteries and run continuously. The batteries also supply energy to an old reel to reel player that plays an interview that Bedini gave to the US talk radio show Open Mind in the 1980s.

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Nick Laessing, Prototype II (after US patent no 6545444 B2 by John Bedini), Talk Radio with John Bedini (excerpts from 1980s radio show Open Mind), 2009

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Nick Laessing, Prototype II (after US patent no 6545444 B2 by John Bedini), Talk Radio with John Bedini (excerpts from 1980s radio show Open Mind), 2009

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Nick Laessing, Prototype II (after US patent no 6545444 B2 by John Bedini), Talk Radio with John Bedini (excerpts from 1980s radio show Open Mind), 2009

Bedini believes that anyone can make the machine at home, all you need is a magnet, some copper coils and an old nail, Laessing explained in an interview with Cluster. But, while it may appear a simple, old-fashioned apparatus you can assemble in the backyard, the truth is that the physics behind the machine is very complex and not conventional at all. I’ve spoken to electrical engineers at various shows who are unable to grasp it; it is created from a completely different view on electricity, different to how we understand it.

Ultimately, i think that what Prototype II (after US patent no 6545444 B2 by John Bedini) demonstrates best is that art is a space where it is possible to expand and explore fringe science, all its idealistic promises and equivocal achievements in a way that would not be regarded as valid in a conventional science context.

The Promise of Total Automation remains open at Kunsthalle Wien until 29 May 2016.

MSA: The Microbiome Security Agency

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Emma Dorothy Conley is an artist, designer and also a producer at the Center For Genomic Gastronomy. Concerned by newspaper stories about the microbiome and how we shed bits of it wherever we go, she decided to investigate the future of microbiome privacy.

The microbiome is a unique collection or community of microbes that live inside and outside our bodies (and pretty much everywhere else on our planet.) Your own microbiome functions as a record that reveals information about the people you’ve met, the places you’ve been to and the food you’ve eaten. In the future, microbial residues collected at crime scene could even help track down criminals. “All you need is an extensive database than currently exists,” explains Jack Gilbert, a microbiologist at Argonne National Laboratory.

MSA-Emma

Of course, the idea that the microscopic organisms that cover our body might one day be used to identify us raises a series of privacy and ethical concerns. The Microbiome Security Agency proposes to create a toolkit of DIY biological information manipulation tactics that would enable us to protect and secure our own data.

The Microbiome Security Agency (The MSA) investigates the future of microbiome privacy issues and prepares citizens for a future where our personal information is at risk through our biological datasets.

The MSA is one of the winning works of this year’s edition of the Bio Art & Design Award. The international competition invites young artists and designers to collaborate with Dutch science centers in order to develop thought-provoking art and design projects that engage directly with life sciences. The winning projects are currently part of Body of Matter, an exhibition that interrogates our ideas about the body.

The website of the MSA is packed with super useful and interesting information but i still wanted to ask Emma a few questions about the work:

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MSA: Microbiome Security Agency, Body of Matter, Installation view, MU, Eindhoven. Photo courtesy of the artist

Hi Emma! What inspired you to work on the Microbiome Security Agency? Did you read any news stories related to the human microbiota and loss of privacy, for example?

Microbiome research is quite prevalent in popular science news, so ​over the last few years I’ve ​
been​ seeing lots of articles every week about emerging research in the field. There were lots ​of articles ​that discussed the uniqueness of an individual’s composition of bacteria, however I​ never found​ anyone pointing ​exactly ​to emerging privacy issues. It seemed like a gap in the conversation that needed to be investigated farther.

People love to read and talk about poop, so pieces on the topic of fecal transplants ​were constantly popping up,​ and​ being shared​ ​and debated online. In fecal transplantation for medical purposes, the donor has a healthy composition of gut bacteria, while the recipient doesn’t. We know our compositions of gut bacteria are fairly unique to us, so​ I started to wonder​, what ​does it mean​​ to give away or take on elements of someone else’s microbiome?

​Investigating this idea of ​”​unique​ness,”​ I started looking up different​ papers on the subject and different​ research groups that take bacteria samples from the general public in exchange for a report of their microbi​al makeup. I thought maybe I’d send in ​a fecal sample and see what my composition looked like​ and how it changed over time​. ​While reading ​the marketing material​ from these microbiome research groups​, I started to seriously question the collect​ion and databasing process​es that these groups use​. The company UBiome, ​for example, ​advertises, “Sequence your microbiome through citizen science!”

In exchange for a ​payment and sending in your fecal sample, ​along with ​loads of personal information about your daily habits, diet, ​and demographics, you receive a report of your ​microbial composition, with little to no actionable information. Is this citizen science? And what do they do with all of this personal information—and personal biological information?​ ​That’s where the project began.

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MSA Samples All

Can you tell us about the MSA DIY toolkit? Which kind of tactics will it provide citizens with? And how affordable and easy to use will it be for everyone?

We set out to ​find a do-it-yourself means for manipulating your microbiome in an effort to protect the information it might reveal. This is very tricky. For many health reasons, you really don’t want to change ​a healthy microbiome very much. ​Your bacteria ​help ​in lots of important bodily processes. It’s widely thought, for example, that the overuse of antibiotics has led to​ many current health issues plaguing the western world. So, instead of a toolkit for DIY microbiome manipulation, we created a system that asks citizens to support each other by investing in their microbiological privacy together. The MSA created ​a ​Community Bacteria Bank. Individuals invest in the bank by donating bacteria-rich samples​ (pretty much anything)​. These samples are processed into an “obscuration solution” to be applied to the skin—anonymizing the pre-existing bacteria. The Community Bacteria Bank functions as a working prototype, testing out ​one possible ​future scenario​ ​or ​system,​ along with​ products and processes,​ for securing our microbiological data.

Leading up to the creation of the bank, we decided to organize the project into two​ research​
categories: destroying and obscuring. Destroying eliminates important information, while obscuring adds noise and anonymizes important information.

In our destroying experiment​s​ we treated fecal samples with household cleaning products, attempting to ​eliminate the​ traces of​ DNA of the bacteria from these samples. Three people donated six fecal samples each, which were treated with:

1. Microwaving
2. Alcohol
3. Peroxide
4. Aceton
5. Ammonia
6. Bleach

Eliminating the DNA would mean that the bacteria would be unidentifiable. We found that it was actually quite difficult to destroy all the DNA from these samples. It was often lessened​ by the cleaning product​, but in equal parts, so the composition was still clear. Peroxide was the most successful, so if you need to destroy a fecal sample in a hurry, it’s your best bet.

From there we moved on to​​​ obscuring the DNA of skin bacteria​, which turned out to be a​ much​ more ​successful approach. In this experiment, we wanted to create an “Obscuration Solution” that could be applied to the skin microbiome to add noise and make your own bacteria unidentifiable. We wanted to create a bizarre, fake microbiome that would hide your own.

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To do this, we collected samples of bacteria-rich items from all over and blended them together. We randomly selected different foods, feces, soils, etc. containing what we knew would be a diverse selection of microorganisms​:​

> red ruffed lemur feces
> greater rhea feces
> white-faced saki feces
> kefir
> epoisse cheese
> kombucha 1
> kombucha 2
> natto
> compost
> kimchi
> soil
> seaweed

Samples of the blended mix were sent to the lab and the DNA from the bacteria was sequenced and amplified, resulting in a synthetic DNA mix resembling a completely new and unique ecosystem of bacteria. This DNA solution was placed in different mediums that could be applied to the skin: a powder, a mist, and a gel.

What’s with the fecal sampling? Why would people try to collect fecal matter at the zoo?​ ​and why the zoo, why not from our pets? or from a public park?

Pets, parks, ​zoo animals, ​everything is good! The beautiful thing about bacteria is that they are just about everywhere. We collected fecal samples from a zoo for two reasons: ​the ​gut ​microbiome contains a diverse selection of bacteria, so you get a dense, varied ​assortment in just a small fecal sample​.​ Gut bacteria compositions also change based on what we eat and where we live, so stool samples from exotic zoo animals can add a lot of diversity to the blended mix.

What were the biggest challenges you encountered while developing the project?

In terms of the research, one challenge​ was performing a difficult experiment in tracking and tracing the changes of the skin microbiome over time. Could we begin to put stories together about where someone ha​s​ been and who they​’ve been around by comparing their makeup of bacteria to those people and places? We tried sampling the skin microbiome as well as different environments by using tape to grab bacteria off different surfaces. We haven’t been successful in proving or disproving traceability yet, but I think it is very important research and I hope there is a lab or research group interested in doing a full study.

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Bacteria Bank. How It Work: AOMs

In terms of the project, realizing that a DIY solution was not (and rarely is) as good as a do-it-together solution was one of the biggest challenges and revelations. We wanted to design something that empowered individual’s to help themselves and to help each other. We wanted to find a clever solution that loudly out-smarted an unfavorable system, rather than​ encouraging others to​ silently hid​e​ in the shadows of that system. The Community Bacteria Bank was designed to do this. It houses the diverse​ bacteria​ samples donated by the public, but it also ​includes satellite-objects, called AOMs, that function like ATMs. These AOMs are designed to be temporary receptacles on the street. Citizens can donate a small bacteria-rich sample at an AOM, but they can also received a dose of the “Obscuration Solution” in the form of a mist, powder or gel. When applied to the skin, this “Obscuration Solution” adds a layer of DNA (not bacteria, just DNA) that obscures the bacteria on the user’s skin.​ The idea is that if we all donate samples to the mix, it becomes very diverse and adds a lot of noise to the Obscuration Solutions. If we all use the same Obscuration Solutions, our skin microbiomes will all look the same and our microbiological information will be secure.​
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MSA: Microbiome Security Agency, Body of Matter, Installation view, MU, Eindhoven. Photo courtesy of the artist

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MSA: Microbiome Security Agency, Body of Matter, Installation view, MU, Eindhoven. Photo courtesy of the artist

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MSA: Microbiome Security Agency, Body of Matter, Installation view, MU, Eindhoven. Photo courtesy of the artist

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MSA: Microbiome Security Agency, Body of Matter, Installation view, MU, Eindhoven. Photo courtesy of the artist

I’m also curious about your collaboration with Guus Roeselers and his research team. How hands-on did you manage to be with the scientific protocols and process? Were you allowed to get inside the labs and work along with the scientists?

I was very lucky to work with Dr. Guus Roeselers. ​In addition to being extremely knowledgeable in regards to the science, he is incredibly creative​ and interested in important cultural and ethical questions. He was always willing to​ imagine and​ explore different futures scenarios, regardless of whether they were controversial or even likely. ​For many reasons, it ​was not possible for me to work in the lab at TNO​.​ In some ways​,​ ​this ​​was very fitting given the idea of the project.​ I prepared many of the samples at my home or in my studio: an average citizen, creating an “​Obscuration ​S​olution” to protect the average citizen. The samples were processed and sequenced and the DNA was amplified by technicians in the lab​, but Guus and I designed and executed all other aspect​s using effective and safe at-home practices.​

The masks and outfits you were on the homepage of the project are quite striking. Can you tell us something about them?

The MSA​ has​ agents​ who​ run the organization. They help in collect​ing ​bacteria-rich samples,​ and​ also manage the AOMs and maintain the bank. They show citizens how to collect and donate samples and explain how the Obscuration Solutions work. MSA Agents wear shimmering, colorful uniforms and large white masks to protect their faces and protect their samples​ and solutions​. The uniforms are designed to be bold and noticeable ​to reinforce the idea that this is a project about​ empowerment​, inspiration ​and fun, rather than fear​fulness.​ ​

Our goal is to create more options for individuals, to test out possible futures, and to challenge the notion that we should fear those with power rather than be empowered ourselves. The MSA is interested in a proactive approach to ​building a future we want to inhabit, by creating options to work with​,​in a complex world​​ filled with unknowns and promise.

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MSA: Microbiome Security Agency, Body of Matter, Installation view, MU, Eindhoven. Photo courtesy of the artist

Thanks Emma!

MSA: Microbiome Security Agency is part of Body of Matter. Body based bio art & design which opens at MU in Eindhoven on 27 November. The show will be running until 7 February 2016. Also part of the exhibition: The Art of Deception by Isaac Monté and Drones with Desires.
Related story: Matter of Life. Growing new Bio Art & Design.