Category Archives: livestage

“besides,” by Annie Abrahams and Martina Ruhsam [online]

Turbulence.org Commission: besides, by Annie Abrahams and Martina Ruhsam :: June 11, 12, 13; 19:00 (CET), 1:00 pm (EDT) (find your local time) :: ONLINE at http://bram.org/besides. Streaming Ivan Chabanaud / mosaika.tv

Three online experiments by Annie Abrahams and Martina Ruhsam, who will investigate the performative potential of computer-mediated performance. By listening to each other’s gestures (in a visual and acoustic sense) they will choreograph each other despite being geographically far away from each other – Annie will be in Montpellier, Martina in Berlin.

besides, is a 2015 commission of New Radio and Performing Arts, Inc. for its Turbulence.org website. It was made possible with funds from the National Endowment for the Arts.

Thursday, June 11, 2015: besides, the person I am becoming.
Duration 20 minutes. The audience can interact via a chatwindow.

As an assemblage of text-fragments and daily objects this live-performance is a series of linkages and open relations between words and banal things.

What do words, a pencil and a stone have in common? Does the stone change when being confronted by a hammer? What changes if it is replaced by a pill? Does the image of a spoon change the thought or does the thought change the thing?

Images talk as much as words. A month long, Martina and Annie collected words and objects – overheard phrases, poetry, academic citations, a piece of concrete, foam, a photo, a scan. Who says what? What can we understand? What if?

Friday, June 12, 2015: besides, moved by some thing.
Duration undetermined. No interaction with the public.

When facing death or illness all the accumulated knowledge surrounding these issues is displaced by experiences that can hardly be shared. Can liminal experiences be communicated verbally?

Annie and Martina recently both had an intimate encounter with death and illness and noticed it is very difficult to talk about this experience to others. Some people flee, others need to be reassured. Most art only touches upon it in a symbolical way.
 Annie and Martina will try to exchange views on the subject. They prepared this meeting individually, and agreed upon only one rule: the performance will be over when both their webcams will be black for more than one minute.

Saturday, June 13, 2015: besides, Dear Body,
Duration 3 minutes. With public chatwindow, so we can discuss afterwards.

A visual letter to (and from) two breathing bodies – exposing their fragility, vulnerability, mortality, strength, singularity and anonymity. Our Bodies are full of History. History is embodied – the skin being the imaginary boundary between a “you” and a “me”.

Dear body, dear body – dear aging body…

There is always something that escapes — some dimension of objects, bodies, events, and processes that withdraws despite all visual presence.

More information (motivation, preparations, intentions, context, tests, bios)

Live Stage: Anthropocene Observatory [Utrecht]

[Image: COP19, United Nations Climate Change Conference, Warsaw, 2013. Photo: Giulia Bruno and Armin Linke.] Anthropocene Observatory by Territorial Agency (John Palmesino and Ann-Sofi Rönnskog), Armin Linke, and Anselm Franke :: February 7 – April 26, 2015 :: Opening: February 6, 6:00 pm :: BAK, basis voor actuele kunst Lange Nieuwstraat 4, 3512 PH Utrecht, The Netherlands.

Anthropocene Observatory is a research exhibition and discursive space that proposes to rethink the contemporary world through the prism of the “Anthropocene thesis.” The Anthropocene is understood as an epoch in geological chronology during which the global impact of human activities is inscribed onto planet Earth. This geohistorical era — marked by the domination of the human species — has brought along transformations that bear unprecedented consequences for all facets of our present and future. Through what ways of looking and knowing, of feeling and being, can we assess these radically altered circumstances? What (future) vocabularies of politics, science, and art might enable us to know, envision, and do things otherwise?

Developed by Territorial Agency (headed by the London-based duo of architects and urbanists John Palmesino and Ann-Sofi Rönnskog) in collaboration with Berlin-based artist Armin Linke and curator Anselm Franke, Anthropocene Observatory forms a complex knowledge archive and study environment that gestures towards ways of approaching these questions. Functioning as an observatory, it puts forth the data and knowledge collected and generated over the course of the last two years, offering them up for public inquiry and critical exploration, so as to probe how the Anthropocene thesis is being recognized and disputed, embraced and discredited, negated and applied across a wide spectrum of scientific, political, and cultural contexts.

Consisting of films, interviews, printed documents, and installations that uncover issues ranging from spatial and territorial modelling to climate change and environmental politics to applied systems analysis to supranational power operations and their institutions, Anthropocene Observatory attempts to image and reconstruct the tangled interrelationships between geology and political history. By making visible how the capitalist world-system is interlocked with the rapid transformation of the Earth system — how changing sources of energy correlate with particular political, legal, managerial, and spatial orders, from city-states dependent on wood, to imperial reliance on the harvesting and uneven distribution of coal, to the global constellation’s dependency on fossil fuels and nuclear energy—the project asks whether the extant infrastructure of knowledge, politics, science, and art is adequate in meeting these colossal challenges. Anthropocene Observatory urges us to not leave these issues unaddressed.

Anthropocene Observatory is part of a research, learning, exhibition, and publishing trajectory at BAK from February to June 2015. It takes place during the semester on Human-Inhuman-Posthuman within BAK’s long-term research project Future Vocabularies (2014–2016), and is realized in dialogue with BAK Research Fellow Prof. Rosi Braidotti and collaboration with the Centre for the Humanities at Utrecht University, Utrecht.

The exhibition is accompanied by a series of talks, master classes, and a curriculum within BAK’s platform for education and talent development, Learning Place. For a full program, see: www.bakonline.org.

Anthropocene Observatory is made possible with support from Haus der Kulturen der Welt, Berlin. The activities of BAK, basis voor actuele kunst have been made possible by financial support from the City Council of Utrecht and the Ministry of Education, Culture and Science of the Netherlands. The parallel project of Future Vocabularies, titled Future Collections (2014–2015), is realized in collaboration with the Centraal Museum, Utrecht and has been made possible by the DOEN Foundation, Amsterdam.

Live Stage: COVER ME by Julian Oliver [online]

Julian Oliver: COVER ME :: January 14 - February 21, 2015 :: Opening: January 14, 2015 @ Link Cabinet.

COVER ME is a gallery of Creative Commons licensed photographs found on Flickr that the artist transformed into data containers for distributing Snowden files. Using a method known as as steganography, the artist embedded the volatile data into images matching the search queries ‘island getaway’ and ‘beach paradise’, without visibly changing their appearance. Here, the act of sharing comforting, tranquil images helps to counterbalance the bleakness and anxiety enshrouding clandestine leaks while broadening the potential for redistribution.

With ignorance as a robust excuse, the images can be safely shared among colleagues at work, uploaded back to Flickr or used as a desktop background while crossing borders. At any given point a leak can be conveniently and privately extracted from the image onto a personal computer using a free and open-source software program developed by the artist.

Julian Oliver is a New Zealander, Critical Engineer and artist based in Berlin. His work and lectures have been presented at many museums, galleries, international electronic-art events and conferences, including the Tate Modern, Transmediale, the Chaos Computer Congress, Ars Electronica, FILE and the Japan Media Arts Festival. Julian has received several awards, most notably the distinguished Golden Nica at Prix Ars Electronica 2011 for the project Newstweek (with Daniil Vasiliev).

Link Cabinet is a single web page hosting solo shows where artists exhibit a single, site-specific artwork. Conceived as a white and neutral exhibition space with an essential interface, Link Cabinet is a blank space that will be transformed by the works on display. After the show, the projects won’t be available on the site anymore. Link Cabinet is a project by Matteo Cremonesi for the Link Art Center.

The Link Center for the Arts of the Information Age (Link Art Center) is a no-profit organization promoting artistic research with new technologies and critical reflections on the core issues of the information age: it organizes exhibitions, events, conferences and workshops, publishes books, forges partnerships with private and institutional partners and networks with similar organizations worldwide.

The Link Art Center is proudly part of Masters & Servers. Networked Culture in the Post-Digital Age, a European adventure focused on a new generation of digital interventionism, awarded with a Creative Europe 2014 – 2020 grant. Up to August 2016, Masters & Servers will explore networked culture in the post-digital age.

Turbulence.org Commission: “Global Direct” by Paolo Cirio

Turbulence.org Commission: Global Direct by Paolo Cirio: Promoting global, participatory democracy Global Direct is a political philosophy driven by information technology and the failure of current political systems to respond to the complexities, crises, and speed of contemporary life. Inspired by the tradition of utopian artistic visions, and informed by extensive research, Cirio’s fifteen organograms illustrate alternative protocols, procedures and policies for actualizing a global democratic system. On the website you will also find an invitation to “Suggest a Slogan,” video statements by prominent advocates of participatory politics, and more. The slogans and printed posters of the Global Direct campaign will be disseminated through social networks and in physical public spaces. Global Direct showcases how distributed networking technologies can be used for participatory decision-making, transparent accountability, and civil awareness.

Global Direct is a 2014 commission of New Radio and Performing Arts, Inc. for its Turbulence.org website. It was made possible with funding from the Jerome Foundation, now celebrating 50 years of the creative spirit of emerging artists. Additionally, Global Direct is supported by DOX Centre for Contemporary Art, Prague, Czech Republic; and Lunatici Cultural A.P.S Association through the Municipality of Parma, Italy.

BIOGRAPHY

Paolo Cirio is an Italian contemporary artist based in Manhattan. His projects have tampered with institutions such as Facebook (Face to Facebook, 2011), Amazon (Amazon Noir, 2006), Google (Google Will Eat Itself, 2005), Nato (Anti-Nato Day, 2002), and the financial industry of the Cayman Islands (Loophole For All, 2013). He renders his conceptual works through performances, photos, drawings, videos and installations. Cirio’s work has been presented and exhibited in major art institutions, including Victoria and Albert Museum, London, 2014; TENT, Rotterdam, 2014; Museum of Contemporary Art, Sydney, 2013; ZKM, Karlsruhe, 2013; CCCB, Barcelona, 2013; CCC Strozzina, Florence, 2013; Museum of Contemporary Art of Denver, 2013; MAK, Vienna, 2013; and Architectural Association, London, 2013. Cirio has won a number of awards, most recently a Prix Ars Electronica Golden Nica (2014). He has also curated panel discussions for The Kitchen (2012) and Eyebeam (2013) in New York City.

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Turbulence Commission: INTERP by Jeff Thompson

Turbulence Commission: INTERP by Jeff Thompson:

INTERP is a series of digital sculptures generated by blending 100 unrelated photographs, placing them into simulated three-dimensional space, and importing them into photogrammetry software, tricking it into thinking that the photographs were of a single object. Thompson is interested in “useless” and culturally-derived data sets, so rather than use an arbitrary archive of photographs (a Google image search for a particular term, for example), it seemed more natural to use a finite set that he had generated himself (approximately 12,000 images when he began the project in 2012). Every photograph was used.

INTERP is a 2014 commission of New Radio and Performing Arts, Inc. for its Turbulence website. It was made possible with funding from the National Endowment for the Arts.

BIOGRAPHY

Jeff Thompson received his BFA from the Minneapolis College of Art and Design and his MFA from Rutgers University. He is currently Assistant Professor and Program Director of Visual Art & Technology at the Stevens Institute of Technology in Hoboken, New Jersey. Thompson has exhibited and performed his work internationally at venues including the Museum of the Moving Image, Sheldon Museum of Art, the Taubman Museum of Art, SITE Santa Fe, Bemis Center for Contemporary Art, the Jersey City Museum, and the Weisman Art Museum. Thompson’s visual and written projects have been published by Ugly Duckling Presse, the Parsons Journal for Information Mapping, and Leonardo Electronic Almanac (MIT Press), among others. In addition to his studio practice, Thompson curates exhibitions through Drift Station, a curatorial collaboration that mounts international, experimental exhibitions.

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