Digital Humanities Slack Group

Some of you might be interested in joining just to see what the culture/people are like. The Digital Humanities Slack is a set of informal, connected chat rooms for the digital humanities, with over 50 “channels” (chat rooms) devoted to specific topics such as DH teaching, coding, and conferences. Source: Google Docs […]

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Writing History in the Digital Age

Interesting to take this . . . It is also worth considering what kinds of concerns may arise for historians who have not yet made use of digital tools like databases in their own research. Historians surely value, maybe even romanticize, the encounter with sources in the archives. Does converting that textual, even textural, experience […]

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Beginners and the Taste Gap

I think about this a lot as I struggle between the things I can do/make and the things I really like. It might be an interesting frame for you. Nobody tells this to people who are beginners, and I really wish somebody had told this to me. All of us who do creative work, we […]

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Class Ten

Big stuff and what to do with it [data/text mining] Reading: Nawrotzki and Dougherty, eds. Writing History in the Digital Age, all entries in Part 4 Jo Guldi and David Armitage, The History Manifesto (updated version; Cambridge University Press, 2015), chapter 4 Representative projects: Mining the Dispatch Voting America Resources/Links/Tools/Media Voyant tools Palladio Google’s Ngram […]

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Protect Government Data for Future Historians: Announcing Endangered Data Week | AHA

Historians thus have a stake in preserving government data, for current projects and for future generations of historians. While many researchers, archivists, and librarians have been working independently to preserve this data for years, historians should join the growing movement for saving these datasets, considering the enormous scope and scale of the task. In the […]

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The Presence of the Past: The Possibilities of Virtual Reality for History – ActiveHistory.ca

VR stands apart from other multimedia technologies primarily because of its ability to generate a sense of presence. Thomas B. Sheridan describes this as a “sense of being physically present with visual, auditory, or force displays generated by a computer.” He proposed three measurable physical variables to determine what he called “telepresence” and “virtual presence”: […]

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