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The Cover Up

Ashleigh Shannon

Green-wash (green’wash’, -wôsh’) – verb: the act of misleading consumers regarding the environmental practices of a company or the environmental benefits of a product or service.

There are Seven Sins of advertisement form companies: Sin of Vagueness, Sin of Irrelevance, Sin of Hidden Trade-off, Sin of Lesser of the Two Evils, Sin of Fibbing, Sin of No Proof, and lastly the Sin of Worshiping False Labels. Greenwashing is most common in three household categories: Kids (toys and baby products), Cosmetics (beauty and health), and Cleaning Products.
From the sinsofgreenwashing.org site, they provide their study of their case in 2009, which unravels the false pretenses of how companies reel in their consumers to make them believe, that they are, in fact, doing the right thing for the environment.
Here’s a excerpt out of their executive summary;

More products are making environmental claims. The total number of ‘green’ products increased by an average of 79% (a range between 40% and 176%) in stores that were visited in both 2007 and 2008. (In a related TerraChoice study, the rate of green advertising was found to have almost tripled since 2006.)Greenwashing is still rampant, with more than 98% of ‘green’ products committing at least one of the Sins. Compared to the 2007 study, there appears to be a small decline in the frequency of greenwashing, but it is not statistically significant. Of 2,219 products making green claims in the United States and Canada, only 25 products were found to be Sin-free.
Eco-labeling is on the rise. Legitimate eco-labeling is nearly twice as common as it was last year, increasing from 13.7% to 23.4% on all ‘green’ products in the report. Kids (toys and baby products), cosmetics and cleaning products are three categories in which green claims – and greenwashing – are most common. These products, among the most common products in most households, deserve particular scrutiny from consumers. Greenwashing is an international challenge, with very similar patterns in the United States, Canada, the United Kingdom, and Australia. The most significant differences between these countries are the environmental issues associated with the claims made on products. Water conservation was more common in Australia for example, and recyclability in the United States.

So I propose a question, If there’s a false sense of hope being put into the world by our naive mindsets, are WE willing to change it to actually make a GREEN world?

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Recyling Pacemakers

In the process of reusing these medical supplies, they call the families of pasted loved ones and ask them if they can removes things such as a pacemakers. One of the main destinations for these medical supplies is India. This form of green washing is kind of looked at in the same light as organ donating. Once you pass, giving a piece of you so that way someone else may live. Whether that be the item not being cleaned well enough or even damaging the equipment in the process. I believe that the idea of finding a way to give cheaper supplies to those who can’t afford it is a great one. The best way to improve the process would be to add those protocols. They already have some protocols for organ donating, so it should have similar ones for medical equipment. The first people who need to get on board with making these protocols needs to be the Food and Drug administration, FDA. The article stated, “The industry doesn’t like recycling. Sure, it’s partly because they would rather sell a new device than sell used ones, but it’s also because we, the American people, are so risk-averse that we have sent the message to the FDA that we are not going to tolerate any kind of risk associated with recycling.” Once those protocols are set in, they need workers to monitor and make sure companies are living up to the standards. One protocol that can be used is monitoring who they are taking these medical implants from and what health conditions they might have. Then once cleaned it should be analyzed for any residue and made sure that it still functions properly. The next step would be making sure that the packaging is suitable for that specific item. Though it would cost companies money to properly clean and make sure the products are safe to use, it can actual save them money by not getting sued or causing multiple deaths. Going green has a price, but someone’s life should not be the cost. In the same sense cutting of the program is cutting of people’s opportunity for a healthier life and with these new protocols, this could be more jobs for people. Green washing in the medical field is something that should be considered if we are not only saving material that would have been wasted, but saving someone’s life as well.

Link for short video about topic: http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/825501

Written By Moriah Brocks

Recycle Medical Equipment From the Dead? Medscape. Jun 05, 2014.

Categories
Uncategorized

Greenwashing Pacemakers

In the process of reusing these medical supplies, they call the families of pasted loved ones and ask them if they can removes things such as a pacemakers. One of the main destinations for these medical supplies is India. This form of green washing is kind of looked at in the same light as organ donating. Once you pass, giving a piece of you so that way someone else may live. Whether that be the item not being cleaned well enough or even damaging the equipment in the process. I believe that the idea of finding a way to give cheaper supplies to those who can’t afford it is a great one. The best way to improve the process would be to add those protocols. They already have some protocols for organ donating, so it should have similar ones for medical equipment. The first people who need to get on board with making these protocols needs to be the Food and Drug administration, FDA. The article stated, “The industry doesn’t like recycling. Sure, it’s partly because they would rather sell a new device than sell used ones, but it’s also because we, the American people, are so risk-averse that we have sent the message to the FDA that we are not going to tolerate any kind of risk associated with recycling.” Once those protocols are set in, they need workers to monitor and make sure companies are living up to the standards. One protocol that can be used is monitoring who they are taking these medical implants from and what health conditions they might have. Then once cleaned it should be analyzed for any residue and made sure that it still functions properly. The next step would be making sure that the packaging is suitable for that specific item. Though it would cost companies money to properly clean and make sure the products are safe to use, it can actual save them money by not getting sued or causing multiple deaths. Going green has a price, but someone’s life should not be the cost. In the same sense cutting of the program is cutting of people’s opportunity for a healthier life and with these new protocols, this could be more jobs for people. Green washing in the medical field is something that should be considered if we are not only saving material that would have been wasted, but saving someone’s life as well.

Link for short video about topic: http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/825501

Written by Moriah Brocks