INSC 310 – TOPIC #7 (Solar System)

PHASES OF THE MOON

Scientific Principles:

  • New Moon: The moon is positioned between the Earth and Sun so it cannot be seen from Earth. The phases signifies new beginnings, and the cycle begins again.
  • Waxing Crescent Moon: “Waxing” means the Moon’s illumination is growing and “Crescent” means less than half of the moon is illuminated. This phases signifies intention.
  • First Quarter Moon: Exactly half of the mood is illuminated and the other half is shadowed. This phases signifies decision making.
  • Waxing Gibbous Moon: “Waxing” means the Moon’s illumination is growing and “Gibbous” means more than half of the Moon is illuminated. This phases signifies refinement.
  • Full Moon: The Sun illuminates the entire moon. This phase signifies release and sealing of intention.
  • Waning Gibbous Moon: “Waning” refers to the decreasing of the Moon’s illumination and “Gibbous” means more than half of Mood illuminated. This phase signifies gratitude.
  • Third Quarter Moon: Exactly half of the Mood is illuminated and the other half is shadowed. We will see the opposite side than the First Quarter Moon. This phase signifies forgiveness.
  • Waning Crescent: “Waning” refers to the shrinking of the Moon’s illumination and “Crescent” means less than half of the Mood is illuminated. This phase signifies surrender.

1.) What was the point of this activity?

To show the phases of the moon and when the moon rises and sets.

2.) Explain how you would introduce this to your class.

By showing a diagram of the different phases of the moon, so that students can identify how they look.

3.) Where do you see a student having difficulty with this?

Students not understanding that the earth has its own rotation, just like the moon.

4.) What changes or extensions could you do to this activity?

Have a lot of different phases and use myself as the earth to show the entire class the phases the moon and making sure they know what it looks like no matter the order.

 

 

 

EARTH’S SEASONS

Scientific Principles:

  • Summer Solstice: The first day of the Season of Summer. On this day (June 21st in the northern hemisphere) the Sun is the farthest north and the length of time between Sunrise and Sunset is the longest of the year;
  • Winter Solstice: The first day of the Season of Winter. On this day (December 22nd in the northern hemisphere) the Sun is the farthest south and the length of time between Sunrise and Sunset is the shortest of the year.
  • Spring Equinox: The first day of the Season of Spring — and the beginning of a long period of sunlight at the Pole. In the northern hemisphere: March 20th (the Sun crosses the Equator moving northward). In the southern hemisphere: September 22nd (the Sun crosses the equator moving southward)
  • Fall Equinox: The first day of the Season of Fall — and the beginning of a long period of darkness at the Pole. In the northern hemisphere: September 22nd (the Sun crosses the Equator moving southward). In the southern hemisphere: March 20th (the Sun crosses the equator moving northward).

1.) What was the point of this activity?

To show the earth’s tilt. and the sun’s position as we experience different seasons

2.) Explain how you would introduce this to your class?

Asking students is it suppose to be hot/cold/warm/cool during which season and how the sun plays into the temperature (based on the earth’s tilt).

3.) Where do you see a student having difficulty with this?

Understanding the extremes (Winter [cold] and Summer [hot]) but not understanding the in between, such as fall and spring.

4.) What changes or extensions could you do to this activity?

Explaining the position of the sun, the season we are experiencing and why.