Tag Archives: connectingideas

Sharpening My Tools

Works Cited

Bush, V.  As We May Think, The Atlantic Monthly176(1):101-108July 1945. Web.

Boritt, Gabor, and David Eisenhower. War Comes Again Comparative Vistas on the Civil War and World War II.. New York: Oxford University Press, 1995. Print.

Douglas, Allen. War, Memory, and the Politics of Humor the Canard Enchan and World War I.. Berkeley: University of California Press, 2002. Print.

Engelbart, D. (1962, October 1). Augmenting Human Intellect: A Conceptual Framework. Augmenting Human Intellect: A Conceptual Framework. Retrieved June 24, 2014, fromhttp://www.dougengelbart.org/pubs/augment-3906.html#6

Gugliotta, Guy. “New Estimate Raises Civil War Death Toll.” The New York Times 3 Apr. 2012, New York Edition ed., sec. Science: D1. Print.

Howard, Blair. Battlefields of the Civil War : A Guide for Travelers. Edison, NJ, USA: Hunter Publishing, Incorporated, 1995. ProQuest ebrary. Web. 24 July 2014.

Licklider, J. C. (1960, March 1). 1 Introduction. Man-Computer Symbiosis. Retrieved June 16, 2014, fromhttp://groups.csail.mit.edu/medg/people/psz/Licklider.html

Riggs, J. E.. “What do you mean, save a soldier from war?: Life’s big small decisions.” Neurology 81: e161-e162. Neurology. Web. 24 July 2014.

Filling My Toolbox

8 Sources:

1.  Vannevar Bush – “As We May Think”

2.  Doug Engelbart – “Augmenting Human Intellect: A Conceptual Framework”

3.  Ted Nelson – “Computer Lib/ Dream Machines” (excerpts)

4.  Gabor S. Boritt & David Eisenhower – “War Comes Again: Comparative Vistas on the Civil War and World War II”

5.  Blair Howard – “Battlefields of the Civil War: A Guide for Travelers”

6.   Allen Douglas – “War, Memory, and the Politics of Humor: The Canard Enchaine and World War I”

7.   W. Seth Carus – “Military Technology and the Arms Trade: Changes and Their Impact” Pg. 163-174

8.  Alfred E. Thal Jr. & William D. Heuck Jr. – “Foresight – Military Technology Development: a Future-Based Approach Using Scenarios”  Pg. 49 – 65

 

Nugget Curation: Part Deux

TAGS: #technology, #computer, #robots, #internet, #google, #productivity, #automation, #production, #intelligence,  #military

+ ADD TAGS #soldier, #war, #impactofwar, #death

As soon as I have redefined my research topic to focus more into soldiers and the functions of soldiers in a war, in the past and present, I had to add more tags to mold my research.

1.  “New Estimate Raises Civil War Death Toll.”-by Guy Gugliotta

Even though this is a New York Times article, Gugliotta was thorough in explaining the war casualty rates back in the Civil War era.  (I probably won’t use this article to support my argumentative claim, but this will be useful in using it as an evidence for my sub-claim.)  Since I want to compare the soldiers action from the time of American Revolution war to most recent war in Iraq, I wanted to figure out each wars’ combat deaths.  From there, I can compare the number of deaths caused by military advancement versus the death caused before technology advancement.  This article was useful in helping me guide through the Civil War era, and the actual numbers of deaths and losses.  TAGS: #soldiers, #war, #impactofwar, #death

2.  Boritt, Gabor, and David Eisenhower. War Comes Again Comparative Vistas on the Civil War and World War II.. New York: Oxford University Press, 1995. Print.

Three authors wrote a book on the comparison on the Civil War versus World War II, which contained informations like military intelligence and military operations.  This book will guide me to find the comparison of different wars that United States were involved in.  (I am only going to research the major wars U.S. were involved in, mainly: American Revolution, U.S. Civil War, World War I, World War II, Korean War, Vietnam War, Invasion of Afghanistan, and Invasion of Iraq.)  From here, I can relate to what it was like back in the day, and how the military tactics/ operations were before the era of technology growth versus guns and knifes (before military weapon growth). Reference: pg. 52 – 53 for military intelligence. TAGS: #technology, #computer, #robots, #internet, #productivity, #automation, #production, #intelligence, #military,  #soldier, #war, #impactofwar, #death

3.  Howard, Blair. Battlefields of the Civil War : A Guide for Travelers. Edison, NJ, USA: Hunter Publishing, Incorporated, 1995. ProQuest ebrary. Web. 24 July 2014.

Chapter 2: The Civil War Solider & His Equipment

This book chapter was a chance for me to get a better idea of what it was like back in Civil War, as what it was like to be a solider back in the day.  I cannot compare the life of the soldiers in different time frames of war if I don’t know what it was like to be one.  So, this is where I started to research deep into the lives of the soldiers.  From here, I want to prove that back then, due to less technology advancement, soldiers had lower survival rate than today.  However, the death rate would be much higher in present wars (WWII, Afghanistan War & Iraq War).  With better destructive weapons, and faster technology development rate, the more fierce the war becomes, and more casualties within wars.  TAGS: #technology, #computer, #robots, #internet, #google, #productivity, #automation, #production, #intelligence,  #military, #soldier, #war, #impactofwar, #death

4.  Douglas, Allen. War, Memory, and the Politics of Humor the Canard Enchan and World War I.. Berkeley: University of California Press, 2002. Print.

CH. 9 Between Cannibalism and Resurrection

The Body of the Unknown Soldier

Douglas, Allen. War, Memory, and the Politics of Humor : The Canard Enchaine and World War I. Berkeley, CA, USA: University of California Press, 2002. ProQuest ebrary. Web. 24 July 2014.
Copyright © 2002. University of California Press. All rights reserved.

Allen Douglas, in Ch. 9 of his book, “War, Memory, and the Politics of Humor the Canard Enchan and World War I”, had a funny way of describing of soldier’s death in wars.  He compared killings at war as cannibalism.  The cannibalism itself describes a gruesome and inhuman activities that goes against our society’s morals.  In a way, the author separated soldiers into two categories: those who gained the title of heroism, or those that were “unknown”.  I can use this to support my arguments on the topic of soldier heroism: the definition of a hero returning back to U.S. after serving his duties versus the unwelcome state  of finding the “unknown” soldiers with no appreciation for their service.  (Need to clear out my argumentative supporting claims.  Not sure how I want to incorporate the topic of heroism into my argument…)  TAGS: #intelligence,  #military, #soldier, #war, #impactofwar, #death

 

5.  Riggs, J. E.. “What do you mean, save a soldier from war?: Life’s big small decisions.” Neurology 81: e161-e162. Neurology. Web. 24 July 2014.

Captain Jack E. Riggs writes about his life as a doctor in Navy Reserve during the time of Operation Iraqi Freedom.  He goes through step by step of an incident that occurred to his patient.  What’s interesting about his story is that his patient (U.S. Military officer-19 years old) had intentionally shot himself in his leg, so that he could be sent home.  To cut the story short, the patient was prosecuted and was sent back to his unit for further evaluation of his service.  It’s just like how technology will change human soldiers into robots.  The military men are commanded by the upper division of leadership, and the soldiers have no option but to obey the commands set forth by the leaders.  In a way, the soldiers are turning into stiff robots, unable to express their empathy and emotions.  TAGS: #technology, #computer, #robots,  #military, #soldier, #war, #impactofwar, #death

Nugget Curation

I have organized my nuggets into a web graph, where I divided each readings into 4 total sub-categories:

1.  Vannevar Bush – “As We May Think”

2.  Ted Nelson – “Computer Lib/ Dream Machines” (excerpts)

3.  J.C.R. Licklider – “Man-Computer Symbiosis”

4.  Doug Engelbart – “Augmenting Human Intellect: A Conceptual Framework”

From these four separate writings and readings, I have divided my TAGS along the web graph.  My tags were consisted of: #technology, #computer, #robots, #internet, #google, #productivity, #automation, #production, #intelligence, and #military.

**Some of the tags were very loosely connected with the main four readings above.  However, many of the tag topics were related or intertwined with my topic of study – shown via debategraph.

Click DEBATEGRAPH for my nugget curation. For some reason, WordPress would not allow debategraph to be embedded.

Diigo Dynamics

In the Diigo Group Website that was previously populated by UNIV 200 students, I found websites like CBS News, Huffington Post,  and CNN web pages.

I found an article: Encouraging Social Interaction Skills In Children With Autism Playing with Robots.  Even though I will  be studying robotics technology in military, I thought this article could be semi-related to my topic of study.  Especially, when I was looking into robots in prosthetic legs and arms for veterans who lost part of their body, I could use some information as the benefits of using robots in therapy.

“Robots, virtual environments and other computer based technologies are more and more being applied in therapy and education.”  -Ben Robins-

“Another advantage of using a robot over a period of time was to facilitate the possible emergence of spontaneous, proactive, and playful interactions. Real time interaction (in contrast to virtual environment and other computer systems) in playful scenarios may encourage full-body experience which can not only increase body awareness and sense of self, but also the level of enjoyment during play and thus make social interaction a more positive experience.”  -Ben Robins-

Artificial Intelligence and the Real World article by Anne Jenkins, concludes the use of robots and co-existing with machines beautifully.

“When machines outsmart humans’ is the wrong stance to take in considering the futures of AI, not just for the underlying competitive values outlined above, but also because it implies that the advanced, autonomous AI will be directly comparable to humans. But if we can be sure of anything, we can be sure that they will be vastly different to us. This is important because what we need to know is can we live with them? Will there be any or enough understanding between the two races, enough to allow real conversation? We can place our hope in finding ways to co-evolve. It could provide the key to keeping the lines of communication open, and to narrowing the gap between our ways of thinking.”  -Anne Jenkins-

The more intelligent one is, the more men of originality one finds. Ordinary people find no difference between men.” Pascal, Pensées, 1670.

I can use this article to support the use of machines and robots co-existing in our world for the benefit of technology advancement.  Like Jenkins have stated in her article, the robots’ required elements of intelligence and opportunity for robotics technology growth may have capacity to superior the human’s intelligence (may benefit human intelligence).