Ewww – “You Will Eat All of That!”: A retrospective analysis of forced consumption episodes

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Food can be delicious, as well as psychological. The article covered a study that was performed to examine the prevalence of forced consumption and the role it plays in food rejection. The research found that when someone has had experience with being forced to eat a food they did not want to eat, they are more likely to have more of an aversion to that food in the long-run, and are more likely to be a picky eater.

I for one, have never been a picky eater. I also have no recollection of my parents ever being forcers of food, although they have been encouraging to try new things. I think that’s why, as an adult I’m very open to trying different types of dishes. My personal experience with forced consumption somewhat correlates with what the article was making a point of. The less experience a person has with forced consumption, the less of a picky eater they will be as an adult. Of course that doesn’t happen with everyone. My brother was the pickiest eater as a child. My parents were never forceful with food, but always questioned why he was so picky and often compared his eating habits to mine, as if his aversions were weird and why he wasn’t more open like me. Now as an adult, my brother is actually more open to trying new things and I would definitely say he is no longer picky. It almost makes my parents proud that he now is willing to eat everything and anything. I’m not sure if in some way their vocal opinions about his being picky was on any spectrum of forced consumption, but I know that if anything, their encouragement made him pick up his fork.

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3 thoughts on “Ewww – “You Will Eat All of That!”: A retrospective analysis of forced consumption episodes

  1. That’s so interesting that you think because you’re parents encouraged instead of forced, that you are open to new food in your life. I liked what you said a lot: “My parents were never forceful with food, but always questioned why he was so picky and often compared his eating habits to mine, as if his aversions were weird and why he wasn’t more open like me.” Because of this statement, I’d be curious to what your brother had to say about him growing up with food, and see if it’s still as pleasant as yours.

  2. I can relate to your past experiences with food, my parents never forced but encouraged my sister and I as well. I find it interesting because my sister has also been a picky eater but more recently and as she has grown older, she has become more open to trying new things just like your brother!

  3. I enjoyed reading your perspective on this subject because I was a picky child, much like your brother. I was a picky eater and was reminded of that fact by my family all the time. However, unlike your family, they often did try to force me to eat certain things I didn’t like just because they thought I “wasn’t giving it a chance”. Now as an adult I still am a pretty picky eater and still do not like the food that I gave many chances. The point you made that because your parents were never forceful resulted in your brother eventually liking more food as an adult is interesting to me. Even if my family had playful intentions of forcing food, I ended up as a picky adult.

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