The Art of the Process Memo

Congratulations—you’re almost done with Essay One! The Process Memo should be your final step before submission. The memo is another layer of reflection; just as you’ve reflected on the significance of particular moments in your narrative, the memo allows you to reflect on the process of writing itself. The memo will function as the “title page” for your essay, and you will submit everything in one document on Blackboard (See “Submission Guidelines”).

The Content: Essentially your memo should explain 1) why your final product looks the way it does—what changes did you make and why?  2) what you learned about the writing process while working on this project and 3) how you’d like to keep developing as a writer in future work—did Essay One teach you about a challenge you haven’t yet had time to meet? As with your narrative essay, you should use specific evidence here—describe a session at the writing center, a conversation with me, and/or a particularly useful piece of feedback from your peer review partner. You may discuss changes in topic, organization or approach. With the heading information and your sign off (see formatting below), the letter should be about one single-spaced page—roughly 250 words.

Grading: The memo is worth two points; most completed memos will receive full marks, although I may take a point if formatting is incorrect or the memo makes only abstract/general comments about your writing process.

Formatting: Your memo should be formatted as a formal business letter; at the top of the page, write the date (followed by an empty line), the identifying information for your addressee (also followed by an empty line) and then a formal greeting. The format will look like this:

30 September 2016

Professor Katie Logan

The Department of Focused Inquiry

University College

Virginia Commonwealth University

Dear Professor Logan,

[Your Text]

Thank you for your time/I look forward to your comments/Etc.

Sincerely/All the best/Best wishes,

Your Name

FI with Dr. Logan