Unit Three Source Reports

Unit Three Source Reports

The source reports for Unit Three are designed to help you learn more about your audience, genre, and venue for your project and to establish some strategies for meeting audience expectations and genre conventions. The assignment has two parts, one due on Friday the 14th, and one due on Monday the 17th.

PART A

Audience Report: Due Friday, April 14th

Write a one-page, single spaced paper describing the audience that you intend to address in Unit Three. You should make use of at least one source (a media kit or “About Us” page, for example) in this research. Follow the steps below for a successful audience report:

  • Briefly identify your desired outcome for Paper Three and your intended audience. Why have you selected this audience? What investments do they have in your topic, and what power do they have to impact your desired outcome?
  • Describe your audience in-depth, using (and citing!) your research—who are they? Where do they come from? What things already matter to them? Are there disagreements within this group? Think here about the work we did last semester when you tried to convince me to throw an end-of-the-year party.
  • Knowing what you now know about your audience, what strategies will best persuade them? You can talk about tone, establishing your own credibility as a speaker, whether facts or anecdotes or a combination will be most effective, which speakers/authorities they might already trust, etc.

Submission: Your audience analysis must be submitted as a Microsoft Word document on Blackboard by the end of class time. Your name and the date should be on the page, and it should be headed with the citation for whatever source you consulted. The report will earn you completion points for Paper Three, and I will grade it on a ten point scale for your short assignment grade.

PART B

Genre Report: Due Monday, April 17th

Write a one-page, single-spaced paper evaluating a model for your Unit Three genre and venue. The model can be about any topic, as long as it shares a genre and venue with your project. For example, someone choosing to write an op-ed in the New York Times about the 9/11 Museum could choose Lin-Manuel Miranda’s “Give Puerto Rico a Chance to Thrive” or Caroline Kennedy’s “A President Like My Father” as the model (it’s the style, not the content, that matters here!).

A successful genre report will do the following things:

Briefly recap your outcome and audience for Unit Three. Then discuss the genre (the kind of writing) and venue (how you will circulate the writing) for the project. Why have you chosen this genre and venue? Why are they the most effective means of reaching your audience and accomplishing your outcome?

  • Identify your chosen model with a sentence or two of background about the author and publication and another sentence or two summarizing the source.
  • Explain why you selected this model: What do you like about it? What do you hope to borrow in your own work? Possible things to address could include the author’s tone, the way they address the audience (do they speak to the audience as if they’re friends? Students?), the way they incorporate outside research, the way they anticipate concerns or counterarguments—the list goes on and on!

Submission: Your audience analysis must be submitted as a Microsoft Word document on Blackboard by the end of class time. Your name and the date should be on the page, and it should be headed with the citation for whatever source you consulted. The report will earn you completion points for Paper Three, and I will grade it on a ten point scale for your short assignment grade.

 

FI with Dr. Logan