Final Plan

As I work through the module I hope to finish 3 of the 5 lessons before the end of the semester. I do not teach solutions until the springtime so I have time in which to finish the rest of the module. I do plan on finishing it at a later date as this will be very useful during AP testing when many students are in and out of class. This is a concept that students could learn in an online format without much difficulty.

As for feedback, I want to know whether my lessons seem to be an appropriate length for students to do for homework when they miss class. In my original time breakdown some lessons were coupled together, but I encouraged students to take notes as they watch the video which requires more time. Based on previous feedback I do believe that the flow of the lessons is solid.

Final TPack Lesson

Title:  Colligative Properties of Solutions

Grade Level/Subject:  11th Grade Chemistry

Lesson Description:  In this lesson the students will be studying the following colligative properties of solutions:  freezing point depression, boiling point elevation and vapor pressure.  The students will begin with a video introduction where key concepts are introduced.  They will then work through a virtual lab that allows them to manipulate variables and study their impact on the various colligative properties of solutions.  Lastly, the students will investigate colligative properties in everyday life.

The main Content (C) of this lesson is the relationship between the number of particles dissolved in solution and their colligative properties.

The main Pedagogy (P) of this lesson is inquiry based learning through virtual experimentation.

The main Technology (T) of this lesson is video introduction via computer followed by a virtual lab activity.

Pedagogical Content Knowledge (PCK)    

Describe:  Solutions are something that students have exposure to every day yet they have a difficult time visualizing what is taking place in a solution.  The inquiry lab is designed so that the students can manipulate the many variables that impact the colligative properties of solutions (i.e. boiling point, freezing point, vapor pressure).  Inquiry learning allows the student to collect and analyze data just as they would in a classroom lab.  The video introduction gives them the necessary background to understand  each of the variables prior to manipulating them in the virtual lab.  If time permits, the students will run a solutions lab in class where a group discussion will take place at the end.  Lastly, having the students investigate the role of colligative properties in their daily lives, their assessment,  leads to greater retention and a deeper understanding of the content.

Support:  Virtual labs provide students with many benefits. The simulations are interactive exercises which help students integrate multiple concepts, increase retention and provide motivation for learning. (Chu, 1999)  Many simulations have a game-like appeal that also increase motivation and retention. Students have the freedom to investigate the variables in a variety of combinations.

Technological Content Knowledge (TCK)      

Describe:  The videos chosen allow for the lesson to offer a 2-fold approach.  The first video is brief but introduces the key terminology that will be applied in the second video and the virtual lab.  The students will need to have a working knowledge of the key terms before attempting the virtual lab.  The second video essentially acts as a pre-lab for the virtual simulation.  The Iowa State virtual lab allows students to experiment and create a visual representation of what is taking place on a very small scale within a solution.

Support:  Being able to model what is happening in a real-life lab helps to prepare students for a time when they actually work in a Chemistry lab.  (Delgamo, 2009)  Any program that helps to make a concept more concrete leads to a deeper understanding of the content.   

Technological Pedagogical Knowledge (TPK)   

Having the students build a working vocabulary and model the concept prior to working in lab always makes the lab experience more meaningful.  Modeling concepts allows the students to explain what is taking place on a microscopic scale which in turn explains what they are seeing on a macroscopic level.  The virtual lab experience allows for learning on a synthesis level.  An inquiry experience, such as virtual labs, requires the student to collect data, analyze it and then predict changes based on their experiences.  Students learn how to integrate content and hands-on learning.

Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge (TPACK) 

Solutions are something that students come in contact with on a daily basis.  We cover this topic in the spring when students are taking AP exams and often miss class.  Having the students take notes on the videos is the first exposure to the key terms in this lesson.  Using those same terms in the virtual lab helps the students to be able to visualize the structure of a solution.  Lastly, deeper learning takes place when the students are asked to research and explain how colligative properties pertain to real world products.

References:

Chu, K. C. (n.d.). What are the benefits of a virtual laboratory for student learning? HERDSA Annual International Conference, Melbourne, 12-15 July 1999 (pp. 1-9).

Delgamo, B., Bishop, A. G., Adlong, W., & Bedgood, D. R., Jr. (2009, June 16). Effectiveness of a Virtual Laboratory as a preparatory resource for Distance Education chemistry students. Retrieved November 04, 2016, from http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S036013150900116X

Self Regulated Learning in Online Courses

In the module that I have developed on Solutions I do think that self-regulated learning will have to be addressed at the beginning of the module and will most likely continue on-off until the module due date arrives.  Most of my students don’t  self-regulated their learning in a face-to-face class so why would I expect them to do so in an online environment.  As the students begin the module I plan on providing the them  with a rubric as to how the work will be evaluated .  To me the rubric helps the students with goal setting.  Not all students seek to earn an A so they will able to determine what is the minimum amount of work required to pass.  Students also need to be reminded to submit early and often as technology is not perfect.  I also feel as though the students should be required to show some evidence of learning after they have watched online video presentations.  Too often students “watch” a video with very little focus and attention to detail.  This creates an opportunity for me to provide feedback long before they reach the application of content in the virtual lab.  Lastly, students need to be reminded to make the content their own.  Print out notes and highlight them or summarize them in a concept map.  Don’t be so passive during the learning process.

As the students work through the module they will need prompting to seek out help from the instructor or their peers when reaching the problem solving portion .  I say this as I have pushed them all year to ask for help, ask questions, discuss results with lab partners, etc., as many students see themselves as a silent island.  They become frustrated as tasks become more difficult but refuse to seek clarification and assistance.  Those students who routinely seek help self regulate and adjust their strategy for solving the problem go on to be very successful.  At the high school level you will have clusters of students who have developed the skills for self-regulated learning but most are clearly not ready to be successful in an online course.  So the question remains, at what point in a student’s educational path do we identify the necessary skills for SRL so that students will do well in any type of learning environment?  or do the students need to be more mature before addressing concepts such as self-assessment?

 

TPack -2: The Journey Continues

Title:  Colligative Properties of Solutions

Grade Level/Subject:  11th Grade Chemistry

Lesson Description:  In this lesson the students will be studying the following colligative properties of solutions:  freezing point depression, boiling point elevation and vapor pressure.  The students will begin with a video introduction where key concepts are introduced.  They will then work through a virtual lab that allows them to manipulate variables and study their impact on the various colligative properties of solutions.  Lastly, the students will investigate colligative properties in everyday life.

The main Content (C) of this lesson is the relationship between the number of particles dissolved in solution and their colligative properties.

The main Pedagogy (P) of this lesson is inquiry based learning through virtual experimentation.

The main Technology (T) of this lesson is video introduction via computer followed by a virtual lab activity.

Pedagogical Content Knowledge (PCK)    

Describe:  Solutions are something that students have exposure to every day yet they have a difficult time visualizing what is taking place in a solution.  The inquiry lab is designed so that the students can manipulate the many variables that impact the colligative properties of solutions (i.e. boiling point, freezing point, vapor pressure).  Inquiry learning allows the student to collect and analyze data just as they would in a classroom lab.  The video introduction gives them the necessary background to understand the each of the variables prior to manipulating them in the virtual lab.  If time permits, the students will run a solutions lab in class where a group discussion will take place at the end.  Lastly, having the students investigate the role of colligative properties in their daily lives, their assessment,  leads to greater retention and a deeper understanding of the content.

Support:  Virtual labs provide students with many benefits. The simulations are interactive exercises which help students integrate multiple concepts, increase retention and provide motivation for learning. (Chu, 1999)  Many simulations have a game-like appeal that also increase motivation and retention. Students have the freedom to investigate the variables in a variety of combinations.

Technological Content Knowledge (TCK)      

Describe:  The videos chosen allow for the lesson to offer a 2-fold approach.  The first video is brief but introduces the key terminology that will be applied in the second video and the virtual lab.  The students will need to have a working knowledge of the key terms before attempting the virtual lab.  The second video essentially acts as a pre-lab for the virtual simulation.  The Iowa State virtual lab allows students to experiment and create a visual representation of what is taking place on a very small scale within a solution.

Support:  Being able to model what is happening in a real-life lab helps to prepare students for a time when they actually work in a Chemistry lab.  (Delgamo, 2009)  Any program that helps to make a concept more concrete leads to a deeper understanding of the content.   

Technological Pedagogical Knowledge (TPK)   

Having the students build a working vocabulary and model the concept prior to working in lab always makes the lab experience more meaningful.  Modeling concepts allows the students to explain what is taking place on a microscopic scale which in turn explains what they are seeing on a macroscopic level.  The virtual lab experience allows for learning on a synthesis level.  An inquiry experience, such as virtual labs, requires the student to collect data, analyze it and then predict changes based on their experiences.  Students learn how to integrate content and hands-on learning.

Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge (TPACK) 

Solutions are something that students come in contact with on a daily basis.  We cover this topic in the spring when students are taking AP exams and often miss class.  Having the students take notes on the videos is the first exposure to the key terms in this lesson.  Using those same terms in the virtual lab helps the students to be able to visualize the structure of a solution.  Lastly, deeper learning takes place when the students are asked to research and explain how colligative properties pertain to real world products.

References:

Chu, K. C. (n.d.). What are the benefits of a virtual laboratory for student learning? HERDSA Annual International Conference, Melbourne, 12-15 July 1999 (pp. 1-9).

Delgamo, B., Bishop, A. G., Adlong, W., & Bedgood, D. R., Jr. (2009, June 16). Effectiveness of a Virtual Laboratory as a preparatory resource for Distance Education chemistry students. Retrieved November 04, 2016, from http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S036013150900116X

Theory and Practice of eLearning – Activities

As I read through the activities list it was interesting to find that I have already incorporated several of the suggested activities into my module outline.  There are key terms that are necessary for the students to master in order to understand the mathematical formulas that they will be testing in the virtual lab.  Quizlet is great way for them to study these terms in a variety of electronic formats.  Most often the students find that sets of flash cards on their topic already exist on Quizlet. A large part of my learning module has students solving problems as there are many mathematical relationships that the students will investigate.   At the end of the module the students will be writing about real-life examples of solution concepts.  They may include images or short videos as part of their example.  Once they upload their examples I will have the students peer edit their work before I grade it.  As of now I plan to have the students peer edit in class.  The students already have lab partners and table mates so their peer editing partners are set.  Lastly, I use concept mapping quite often when bringing unit concepts together.  It is a great way to determine whether students are making the necessary connections within the content.  If time allows I would like to do this in class as I would like to have students share their maps at the end of the activity.  If not, I can assign it online.  What I always point out to the students are the different ways in which we bring concepts together in our minds.  We rarely make these connections using the same pathway but we arrive at a common end point.

Teaching Roles

My course module is centered on a short unit about Solutions.  The unit was designed to be almost entirely online.  Having read the articles on teaching roles in online courses I really had to stop and think about the module I have built thus far.  I will certainly have a Pedagogical Role as the designer of the module.  I have organized the content introduction and a mix of activities so that they link to real-world applications at the end.  The students will be given the criteria by which they will be evaluated.  I will certainly be giving feedback as the students will be submitting assignments and taking a test at the end of the unit.  I will have a limited role as a facilitator online as the course will have some dialogue between students but most of that will take place in class when we have our unit ending solutions lab.

As for a Social Role, at this point in the school year my students have built a rapport with me and their peers.  We did start off the year with an online introduction that they submitted through Schoology.  The students also work with lab partners each week which helps to bring about dialogue among themselves.  My social role will be more of a “cheerleader” when they are struggling with the math concepts in the unit.  As Vygotsky said  the teacher becomes a “guide on the side” rather than a content provider.

The Managerial Role works hand in hand with the Pedagogical Role.  Organizing the flow of learning  in a clear and concise manner is very important in learning.  As a classroom teacher I spend a good bit of time planning as I want my lessons and activities to flow from lesson to activity and from day to day.  In this solutions module I made sure that the content built upon itself and concluded with an activity that concluded with real-world examples.  As for being a conference manager, I will have deadlines to assure that the students don’t wait until the last day to complete the entire module.  There will be some peer review at the end about the samples that each student submitted about real-world connections.  I will set guidelines ahead of time as to how to make constructive comments, etc.

The last role, the Technical Role, is somewhat limited in this module.  I will give students directions for working through the interactive labs that are being used in the lessons.  I will troubleshoot when students are having difficulty  with virtual labs.  The Schoology LMS has worked well with my students as it seems to have very few technological glitches.  Most often, when students are having difficulties with an online quiz or viewing a video, they are using their phones.  Not all virtual activities are HTML compliant and the students don’t know enough about the technology that they are using  to know when they need to use a computer or to change settings, etc.  The short video clips and  virtual activities that I selected are simple so they are very simple to use and will open on most devices.  At this point I am mostly an integrator of technology developed by others.

 

TPACK

Title:  Colligative Properties of Solutions

Grade Level/Subject:  11th Grade Chemistry

Lesson Description:  In this lesson the students will be studying the following colligative properties of solutions:  freezing point depression, boiling point elevation and vapor pressure.  The students will begin with a video introduction where key concepts are introduced.  They will then work through a virtual lab that allows them to manipulate variables and study their impact on the various colligative properties of solutions.  Lastly, the students will investigate colligative properties in everyday life.

The main Content (C) of this lesson is the relationship between the number of particles dissolved in solution and their colligative properties.

The main Pedagogy (P) of this lesson is inquiry based learning through virtual experimentation.

The main Technology (T) of this lesson is video introduction via computer followed by a virtual lab activity.

Pedagogical Content Knowledge (PCK)    

Describe:  Solutions are something that students have exposure to every day yet they have a difficult time visualizing what is taking place in a solution.  The inquiry lab is designed so that the students can manipulate the many variables that impact the colligative properties of solutions (i.e. boiling point, freezing point, vapor pressure).  Inquiry learning allows the student to collect and analyze data just as they would in a classroom lab.  The video introduction gives them the necessary background to understand the each of the variables prior to manipulating them in the virtual lab.  If time permits, the students will run a solutions lab in class where a group discussion will take place at the end.  Lastly, having the students investigate the role of colligative properties in their daily lives, their assessment,  leads to greater retention and a deeper understanding of the content.

Support:  Virtual labs provide students with many benefits. The simulations are interactive exercises which help students integrate multiple concepts, increase retention and provide motivation for learning. (Chu, 1999)  Many simulations have a game-like appeal that also increase motivation and retention. Students have the freedom to investigate the variables in a variety of combinations.

Technological Content Knowledge (TCK)      

Describe:  The videos chosen allow for the lesson to offer a 2-fold approach.  The first video is brief but introduces the key terminology that will be applied in the second video and the virtual lab.  The students will need to have a working knowledge of the key terms before attempting the virtual lab.  The second video essentially acts as a pre-lab for the virtual simulation.  The Iowa State virtual lab allows students to experiment and create a visual representation of what is taking place on a very small scale within a solution.

Support:  Being able to model what is happening in a real-life lab helps to prepare students for a time when they actually work in a Chemistry lab.  (Delgamo, 2009)  Any program that helps to make a concept more concrete leads to a deeper understanding of the content.   

Technological Pedagogical Knowledge (TPK)   

Having the students build a working vocabulary and model the concept prior to working in lab always makes the lab experience more meaningful.  Modeling concepts allows the students to explain what is taking place on a microscopic scale which in turn explains what they are seeing on a macroscopic level.  The virtual lab experience allows for learning on a synthesis level.  An inquiry experience, such as virtual labs, requires the student to collect data, analyze it and then predict changes based on their experiences.  Students learn how to integrate content and hands-on learning.

Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge (TPACK) 

Solutions are something that students come in contact with on a daily basis.  We cover this topic in the spring when students are taking AP exams and often miss class.  Having the students take notes on the videos is the first exposure to the key terms in this lesson.  Using those same terms in the virtual lab helps the students to be able to visualize the structure of a solution.  Lastly, deeper learning takes place when the students are asked to research and explain how colligative properties pertain to real world products.

References:

Chu, K. C. (n.d.). What are the benefits of a virtual laboratory for student learning? HERDSA Annual International Conference, Melbourne, 12-15 July 1999 (pp. 1-9).

Delgamo, B., Bishop, A. G., Adlong, W., & Bedgood, D. R., Jr. (2009, June 16). Effectiveness of a Virtual Laboratory as a preparatory resource for Distance Education chemistry students. Retrieved November 04, 2016, from http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S036013150900116X