4 Reasons Why Parents Should Not Believe the Mommy Wars Hype

#1) A recent Parents.com poll showed that most parents have never actually seen or been involved in a dispute with another parent online, even though they hear or read about “mommy wars” all the time. This shows that mommy wars are more of a fabrication than an actual experience for parents.

#2) A Pew Research Center survey showed that almost 2/3 of parents receive support from friends, family and strangers online. A vast majority of mothers, specially, said they receive support, seek information and ask for advice on social media. One great example is the Facebook group “Ask the Chicks,” in which almost 9,000 pregnant women and young mothers participate. A survey conducted with some of the group’s members found that the possibility of receiving tailored advice is what draws them to these kinds of groups instead of simply Googling about their issue.

#3) Forums dedicated to parents facing the challenge of raising a child with behavioral problems, mental illnesses or disabilities offer privacy, information and support. Parents see these online places as the best way to get first hand accounts from others with similar problems but more experience dealing with them, as sometimes medical and professional advice fails to consider each family’s individual needs.

 

#4) Mothers who suffered a miscarriage or the loss of a child can greatly benefit from sharing their experiences online. A case study of Angie Smith’s blog, created when she received the news her unborn baby would not survive after birth, provided several examples of readers’ reports that learning about other mothers suffering the same loss was crucial for their grieving process. Another study conducted with a bereaved parents group on Facebook found that, for the participants, the most important aspect of the group was sharing their grief with others who understood their pain in a way that their relatives and friends did not. These two examples show that, through the Internet, parents can transcend geographical and social borders to connect, share and support one another through miscarriage and death.

One thought on “4 Reasons Why Parents Should Not Believe the Mommy Wars Hype

  1. I like how you’ve framed this argument.
    parents can transcend geographical and social borders to connect, share and support — could be the stated reason in #4. Then the miscarriage example could be evidence for this reason. Does that make sense? (state the reason first, then provide evidence that forums help parents transcend geography, etc).
    Same for #2 — you give evidence (The Pew Research evidence) but state the REASON in a sentence before the evidence.
    The “hallelujah” gif made me laugh!

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