Tag Archives: TEDU 414

TEDU 414 – Philosophy of Teaching

This is a personal writing and perspective of my own philosophy on teaching. It touches on several ideas based around teaching and was a way for me to really consider what I believe to be true for teaching.

Philosophy of Teaching

The role of a teacher is simple, yet complex. They are there to act as a mentor to students, as someone who can help a young mind come to understand the world in which they live, both academically and in life itself, and furthermore, help them to find where they belong in such a vast place. A teacher’s role is to facilitate learning and promote internal and external growth in their students through dedication, care, patience, and love. And as such, a teacher must be aware that all students learn their best differently and must then be able to cater their teaching to these differences. A good teacher, a teacher who truly wants to see their students succeed and excel in shaping the future of our world, is one that will work with a student, no matter what they need, and help that child to reach their full potential in all areas of learning.

With my own teaching, I hope to be able to fulfill this role as a mentor, a guide, and a caregiver. I will do everything in my power to ensure that my students not only learn, but have all of the necessary tools to learn what they need to and have fun while doing so. I hope to incorporate a plethora of different lessons and activities in my teaching, such as getting the students moving with content based movement games or allowing them to so their artist expression and understanding of a subject through fine arts and projects, to ensure that all of my students, no matter if they are a visual, auditory, or kinesthetic learner, gain something from their schooling. And not only will I work to make sure that they have what they need to be prepared for the future, but I will also be sure to be prepared myself before teaching them. I will plan my lessons beforehand, using the state standards as guidelines and my own thinking as well as help from my fellow teachers or other resources, to ensure maximum time spent learning and reduce the chance of any issues with time or behavioral management. After all, the less time spent quieting the class down or setting up an activity, the more time can be spent actually teaching the content. Technology will also have a place in my classroom. I hope to be able to use any available technology to enhance my teaching, whether it be implementing SmartBoard, interactive activities into my teaching or simply helping students to have visuals with their notes by creating PowerPoints. There is nothing that I would not try to use in my classroom to expand and help perfect the effectiveness of my teaching.

While there is always room for growth and improvement, and one should never stop striving to learn and grow, there are a few aspects of my teaching that I know work in my favor as an effective teacher. I am very energetic. It is easy for me to get a group of students excited or for a lesson because I am able to go into a room with pep and pizzazz enough to make the content interesting. I am also quite patient and can easily sit down and work on something for long periods of time without issue. But even being such, I understand that my students may not be the same and that sometimes we may just need to change things up. I also come from a very diverse family and background, with all of my family being from places all over the world, and can use that to not only interest students, but also connect with them. I can use it as a stepping stone to support diversity in my class and help students understand we are all different, but that it is good and it makes us who we are. These are just a few of traits that I know I possess and can use to better support my students as they learn. But even with that said, there is so much more for me to discover. I hope to continue to build up my teaching and my own learning so that I can better help to inspire students to do the same, to keep learning, to keep growing, and to keeping working towards being the best person that they can be.

TEDU 414 – Unit Plan (Science Centered)

This is a collaborative effort between myself and two partners in which we created a full, seven day unit plan for the third grade, science SOL 3.4 Life Processes and Adaptations. It was a lengthy process that was very informative and rewarding as it allowed me to see what it takes to not only create a full plan for a full SOL, but also how valuable it is to have experience working with others when planning lessons.

Unit Plan for Life Processes

Grade: 3

SOL: Science: Life – Processes: 3.4
The student will investigate and understand that adaptations allow animals to satisfy life needs and respond to the environment. Key concepts include
– a) behavioral adaptations; and
b) physical adaptations.

Kelsey McPeters, Jessica Landers, & Melanie Gin

Teaching Time Frame: 7 Days

Unit Introduction:

Science SOL 3.4 looks into the different adaptations that animals must work through to satisfy life needs in the environment in which they live. These adaptations are split into two main categories: physical and behavioral. Physical adaptations include finding food, finding shelter, using defense, and rearing their young. Behavioral adaptations include hibernation, migration, dormancy, instinct, and learned behavior. Included in physical adaptations, camouflage and mimicry play a role in the survival of animals. The students will learn the definitions of each attribute and examples of each that animals use for survival.

The following unit teaches all of the parts of Science SOL 3.4’s physical adaptations through a multitude of different teaching methods, including; PowerPoint presentations, on and offline games, discussions, and much more. The unit will take place at the beginning of the Life Processes in general, and will come before teaching the other part of SOL 3.4, behavioral adaptations. It will focus on generally introducing what physical adaptations are, days one and two, before delving into each specific type of physical adaptation, day three focusing on gathering and storing food, day four being finding shelter, day five being defense, six being rearing young, and seven focusing on a review of all of the adaptations. Students should go into the unit with a basic understanding of animals and the basic needs that they need to survive. The until will further elaborate on these concepts of basic needs and life, as well as introduce new ideas based around survival and its specifics.

Unit Plan; Lesson Plan 1:

First Day – General Intro to Adaptations, Behavioral and Physical

Purpose

  • The purpose of this lesson is to familiarize the concepts of adaptations in life processes to students, building upon prior knowledge, as well as introducing new ideas. Both physical and behavioral adaptations will be mentioned at a basic, introductory level.
  • SOLs
    • Science: Life – Processes: 3.4
      The student will investigate and understand that adaptations allow animals to satisfy life needs and respond to the environment. Key concepts include

      •  a) behavioral adaptations; and
      • b) physical adaptations.
    • Computer Technology: 3.9 Use models and simulations to understand complex systems and processes.
      • a) Understand the use of simulations in learning.Enhance understanding of concepts and skills by explaining how a
        simulation differs from and is similar to real life.
      •  b) Use simulations to understand complex concepts.
        Enhance understanding of concepts and skills by using simulations.

Objective

  • Third grade students will be able to demonstrate an understanding of adaptations, both physical and behavioral, given a SMARTboard, SmartTech sorting activity with 85-90% accuracy.

Procedure

Introduction

  • Hook the class with a brain break. Have the students pick a partner and spread out throughout the room. Give them one minute to brainstorm their favorite animal. After that minute is up, have them spend 3 minutes a piece demonstrating their animal using movement and verbal cues and have their partner guess what animal they are representing.
  • Begin the lesson by telling students that they will be learning about adaptations, and that they will learn about both physical and behavioral adaptations.
  • Ask the students what they know about how animals live and survive in the wild, and have them share their answers with the class.

Development

  • When the class discussion is wrapped up, a handout of the Powerpoint is passed out to students to glue into their science notebooks.
  • While the students are gluing their handouts in their notebook, bring up the PowerPoint on adaptations (visual & auditory).
  • The PowerPoint will cover the following:
    • Adaptations:
      • Definition: Any change that is made to help an animal survive
      • Two different types: Physical and Behavioral
      • Physical: Adaptations that help animals survive in their environment (e.g., camouflage, mimicry)
      • Behavioral: Adaptations that allow animals to respond to life needs. Examples include hibernation, migration, dormancy, instinct, and learned behavior.
  • During the presentation of the PowerPoint the students are expected to follow along and fill in the blanks with the correct vocabulary (Auditory, Kin.)
  • After the presentation, explain the SmartTech sort activity on the Smartboard (visual, kin.). This involves:
    • Identifying the basic, adaptive traits of an animal
    • Sorting the defined trait as behavioral or physical
  • All students will each take a turn on the Smartboard sorting and answering the questions, this will determine what they have learned and be an objective for assessment from the lesson.

Summary

  • Review the sorting game results and correct any mistakes made during the sort to assure that the students have the correct information.
  • Review as a class, asking questions:
    • What does adaptation mean?
      • Changes to help an animal survive.
    • Physical adaptations with supported vocabulary and examples
      • Camouflage: they way an animal hides itself from danger.
        • Example: Chameleons camouflage their self by changing colors to blend in with their environment to hide from danger.
      • Mimicry: an animal uses similar features as another animal to protect their self.
        • Example: Monarch butterflies mimic another butterfly that other animals know that taste bad.
    • Behavioral adaptations with supported vocabulary and examples
      • Hibernation: a condition of biological rest or inactivity where growth, development, and metabolic processes slow down.
        • Example: Bears and groundhogs hibernate for the winter.
      • Dormancy:  is a state of reduced metabolic activity adopted by many organisms (both plants and animals) under conditions of environmental stress or, when such stressful conditions are likely to appear, as in winter.
        • Example: Snakes and many other reptiles find shelter in holes or burrows, and spend the winter inactive, or dormant.
      • Migration: long-distance journey from one place to another.
        • Example: Geese will fly south during the winter to warmer places.
      • Instinct:  born with natural behaviors that they need in order to survive in their environments.
        • Example: Spiders spin webs to catch their food.
      • Learned behavior:  need to be taught in order for the animal to survive.
        • Example: A bear cub learning to hunt.

Differentiation

  • For struggling students, the answers for the handout will be given visually (in the powerpoint) and verbally (in the presentation spoken by the teacher). The important words that are intended to be filled into the blanks will also be underlined in the powerpoints.
  • For our more advanced students, they will be given an opportunity to share more facts that they have learned in previous experiences

Materials

Evaluation

(Part A)

  • Student progress will be evaluated based on how well he or she performs during the sorting/ matching game, and whether or not the student can correctly match an animal and its adaptation to either the physical or behavioral category.

(Part B)

  • Did the students meet your objectives?

 

  • How do you know?

 

  • Did your lesson accommodate/address the needs of all of your learners?

 

  • What were the strengths of the lesson?

 

  • What were the weaknesses?

 

  • How would you change the lesson if you could teach it again?

Resources:

https://docs.google.com/a/mymail.vcu.edu/document/d/1XNDV5oRBdIGcW_921PA8YcvW_wATa1LUBjrG2fCmuG8/edit?usp=sharing

https://docs.google.com/a/mymail.vcu.edu/presentation/d/1LfFoJVAHtPeh9SWh_Cfz1AzYPgcuftXwDEmfe2D9LnE/edit?usp=sharing

Unit Plan; Lesson Plan 2:

Second Day – General Intro to All Physical Adaptations

Purpose

  • Students will gain a basic understanding of the four different types of physical adaptation. They will also review and reinforce their knowledge about physical adaptations in general.
  • SOLs
    • Science: Life – Processes: 3.4
      The student will investigate and understand that adaptations allow animals to satisfy life needs and respond to the environment. Key concepts include

      • a) behavioral adaptations; and
      •  b) physical adaptations.
    • Language Arts: 3.2The student will present brief oral reports using visual media.
      • a) Speak clearly.
      • b) Use appropriate volume and pitch.
      • c) Speak at an understandable rate.
      • d) Organize ideas sequentially or around major points of information.
      • e) Use contextually appropriate language and specific vocabulary to communicate ideas.
    • Fine Arts: 3.6The student will create works of art that communicate ideas, themes, and feelings.

Objective

  • The student will be able to accurately demonstrate an understanding of the four different types of physical adaptations by answering questions correctly given exposure to group presentations and an index card without error.

Procedure

Introduction

  • Introduce the lesson by having students join you on the floor, near where the chart paper is kept.
  • Be sure to have them bring a pencil and their science notebooks.
  • Hook the students by asking them to think of all the different ways an animal might change to fit in its environment, and then have a few volunteers share, telling and showing physically (Kin).
  • Tell students that today they will be reviewing what a physical adaptation is, as well as what the four different types of physical adaptations are.

Development

  • Begin the lesson with a review of physical adaptations in general, telling students and writing the term and its definition on the chart paper (visual, auditory).
    • Physical Adaptation: anything that help animals survive in their environment (e.g., camouflage, mimicry)
  • Next, introduce the four different types, writing them with their definitions and examples on the chart paper as well (visual, auditory).
    • Gathering and Storing Food: When an animal is able to find, obtain, and keep food for later. (e.g., Squirrels gathering nuts for winter)
    • Finding Shelter: When an animal is able to find a safe place to live or stay (e.g., Bears living in dens, Rabbits living in rabbit holes, Birds making nests)
    • Defense: How an animal protects itself from danger (e.g., Butterflies using mimicry, Chameleons using camouflage, Snakes being venomous)
    • Rearing Young: How an animal takes care of and raises its babies (Chimp carrying its baby on its back)
  • Allow time for students to copy down the information in their notebooks.
  • Next divide students up into four groups and pass out a piece of large, poster paper and coloring utensils to them.
  • Have each group go and work in a different part of the room.
  • Assign each group one of the four adaptations and have them create a drawing that represents it. Be sure to mention that they need to work together because they will be sharing with the class at the end (Kin.).
  • Allow time for the groups to work before gathering the students back to the chart paper area.
  • Have each group present their art, making sure to have them tell what adaptation, what they adaptation means, and why they drew what they did.
  • Allow time for questions after the presentations before having students return to their seats.

Summary

  • End the lesson by handing out an index card to each student and writing four questions on the board, telling them to answer them for an exit ticket.
    • What adaptation helps an animal know how to care for their babies? (PA: Rear Young)
    • A fox looking for a new den to live in is an example of what adaptation? (PA: Finding Shelter, maybe Rear Young)
    • What is one defense adaptation that can animal can use to hide from predators? (PA: Camouflage, Changing Colors, Looking like a different animal, Mimicry)
    • Which adaptation would describe a squirrel gathering nuts for the winter? (PA: Gathering and Storing Food)
  • When finished, students should turn the cards in to the teacher.

Differentiation

  • Groups who finish early can work together to think of other things they could draw to represent their adaptation.
  • Groups who are struggling could have teacher assistance.
  • Groups who are struggling could have help from students who have already finished.

Materials

  • Teacher
    • Chart paper
    • Writing utensil
  • Student
    • Science notebooks/spirals
    • Paper/ Poster
    • Index card
    • Pencil
    • Coloring utensils

Evaluation

(Part A)

  • Students will be assessed based on how they work as a group in portraying and explaining their specific adaptation, as well as whether or not they have correctly answered all four exit ticket questions on the adaptations.

(Part B)

  • Did the students meet your objectives?

 

  • How do you know?

 

  • Did your lesson accommodate/address the needs of all of your learners?

 

  • What were the strengths of the lesson?

 

  • What were the weaknesses?

 

  • How would you change the lesson if you could teach it again?

 

Unit Plan; Lesson Plan 3

Third Day – Gathering and Storing Food

Purpose

  • Students will understand the factors that go into animals gathering and storing their food by using their physical and behavioral adaptations. The students will look at the different examples of animals gathering and storing food. 
  • SOLs:
    • Science: Life- Processes 3.4 The student will investigate and understand that adaptations allow animals to satisfy life needs and respond to the environment. Key concepts include:
      • a) behavioral adaptations; and
      • b) physical adaptations
    • English: Oral Language 3.1 The student will use effective communication skills in group activities.
      • a) Listen attentively by making eye contact, facing the speaker, asking questions, and summarizing what is said.
      • b) Ask and respond to questions from teachers and other group members.
      • c) Explain what has been learned.
      • d) Use language appropriate for context.
      • e) Increase listening and speaking vocabularies.
    • English: Writing 3.9The student will write for a variety of purposes.
      • a) Identify the intended audience. 
      • b) Use a variety of prewriting strategies. 
      • c) Write a clear topic sentence focusing on the main idea. 
      • d) Write a paragraph on the same topic. 
      • e) Use strategies for organization of information and elaboration according to the type of writing.
      • f) Include details that elaborate the main idea.
      • g) Revise writing for clarity of content using specific vocabulary and information. 

Objective

  • The student will be able to write a short story about one animal solving a problem while gathering and storing food given the video and student discussions with 100% accuracy.

Procedure

     Introduction

  • For the hook the students will be asked about experiences they have seen of animals gathering and storing food.
  • The students can come to the whole group rug while watching a video clip on different animals gathering and storing their food.
  • The students will not have to take notes but to be aware of what is going on with each animal.

     Development

  • Next, we will play video 8 Creative Ways Animals Store Food  (Visual, auditory)                     

(https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Cdtp9aokg1U).

  • After the video is played the students will be expected to talk to a partner on the rug about the different animals gathering and storing their food. The students will explain the animal, where they store the food, and why they store the food in that way.
  • When the discussions are over the students will return to their seats and open their science notebooks to the introduction to adaptations notes. As a class we will review the terms camouflage and mimicry and how these may tie into the animals gathering and storing food.
    • Camouflage: they way an animal hides itself from danger.  
    • Mimicry: an animal uses similar features as another animal to protect their self.
      • These two behaviors come in handy when the animals need to hide from danger. While the animals are gathering food they may need to hide from other animals so their food is not taken from them. The animals will disguise themselves from prey to continue gathering food.

Summary

  • The students will open up to a blank page in their science notebooks and have a pencil to write with.
  • The students will write a short story of one of the animals from the video. They will write about their animal going on a journey to gather their food. The students must include in their story of their animal running into a problem while gathering food and how the animal solves the problem.

Differentiation

–  Students who finish their story early may draw a picture of their story to help visually explain what is going on.

–  Students who struggle with writing their story will have the video to visually see to help draw a picture of their story and explain to another student, who has a written story, about their visual story.

Materials

Evaluation

(Part A)

  • Students will be assessed on their story of the animal solving a problem while gathering and storing their food and their discussions from the video.

(Part B)

  • Did the students meet your objective?

 

  • How do you know?

 

  • Did your lesson accomodate/ address the needs of all of your learners?

 

  • What were the strengths of your lesson?

 

  • What were the weaknesses?

 

  • How would you change the lesson if you could teach it again

 

Unit Plan; Lesson Plan 4:

Fourth Day – Finding shelter

Purpose

  • The purpose of this lesson is to familiarize the concept of finding shelter, building upon prior knowledge, as well as introducing new ideas.
  • SOLs
    • Science: Life – Processes: 3.4
      The student will investigate and understand that adaptations allow animals to satisfy life needs and respond to the environment. Key concepts include

      • a) Behavior adaptations and;
      • b) Physical adaptations
    • Geography: 3.6 The student will read and construct maps, tables, graphs, and/or charts.

Objective

  • Third grade students will be able to demonstrate an understanding of finding shelter, given a facts guessing game and a drawing and describing four box organizer with 85-90% accuracy.

Procedure

Introduction

  • Introduce the class to the topic of shelters by asking how many of them have been caught in a rainstorm and pulled out an umbrella or rain to be under a roof or in a car. Explain to them that this is a way of finding shelter.
  • Ask how many of them have ever gone camping. Explain to them that their tent is their shelter that protects them from outside forces while they sleep.
  • Tie this into the beginning of a fact guessing game. Begin by asking if animals sleep. Then ask if it would be safer for them to sleep out in the open or somewhere under cover from outside forces.
  • Explain to them that today we are going to talk about how, where, and why animals find shelter.
  • Tie this into the actual true or false animal shelter facts game. For this game, the teacher will split the students into four or five teams depending on the number. Have them make up a team name. The teacher will write the team name on the board for keeping score. The teacher will read a fact about animals and their shelters as well as some spoof facts and the teams have to discuss and decide together whether they think that the fact is true or false. Once the groups are finished discussing, the teacher will ask the groups to raise their hand to tell whether they said true or false. The teacher will write the answers given by the students on the board under the group names. Then the groups that got the correct answer, will be given one point. For each true fact, have the student write it in their science notebooks.

Development

  • After the game, review the facts that we learned in our true or false game and some of the animals covered and have the students copy the facts into their science notebooks.
  • The students will create a four box drawing and describing worksheet that reviews the facts learned in our fame.
  • Give the students each a worksheet with four square organizer.
  • Each animal gets its own box and in the box they will be expected to draw a picture that includes facts learned in the game.
  • Under each box, there will be a box where the students will describe the picture drawn using vocabulary terms learned in the True or False game.

Summary

  • Review the facts discussed again.
  • Review by asking :
      • What is a shelter? –A place that gives temporary protection from bad weather or danger
      • What does it mean for animals to find shelter? –The animals seek for a place to hide
      • Why does an animal need shelter? –An animal seeks shelter when they need protection from things. They do this when they want to sleep and sometimes when they want to give birth.
      • Can you give me an example of an animal, its shelter, and why it finds shelter there? –A lion seeks shelter under shady trees. They seek shelter here to provide them shelter from the sun and the heat. Lioness find shelter in dens, caves, or thickets when they are giving birth to protect their young from cub predators.

Differentiation

  • For struggling students, the facts will be given in a powerpoint and will be given verbally by the teacher. When they are making the four box picture and describing organizer, they will be allowed to use pictures or writing to explain their answers.
  • For our more advanced students, they will be given an opportunity to write about the animal on the back of their organizers, telling more facts about the animal that they would like to remember, or creating a blurb that will help them remember what kind of shelter the animal lives in and why.

Materials

  • Teacher
    • Powerpoint for facts
    • Wall/smartboard for projection
    • Smartboard or chalkboard
    • Four box organizer
  • Student
    • Pencil and erasers
    • Paper
    • Glue Sticks
    • Scissors
    • Science notebooks/folders
    • Colored pencils
    • Markers

Evaluation

(Part A)

  • Student progress will be evaluated based on how well he or she performs during the true or  false fact game, and whether or not the student correctly identified the animals shelter and why the animal finds shelter there in their four box organizer.

(Part B)

  • Did the students meet your objectives?

 

  • How do you know?

 

  • Did your lesson accommodate/address the needs of all of your learners?

 

  • What were the strengths of the lesson?

 

  • What were the weaknesses?

 

  • How would you change the lesson if you could teach it again?

Resources:

https://docs.google.com/a/mymail.vcu.edu/presentation/d/1dcrbpjOAAVv6DgNEw_tJeHd1cLiV42ZJcuTsegL2EPo/edit?usp=sharing

https://drive.google.com/a/mymail.vcu.edu/file/d/1u5fumCNfzEiIy60YuPqKDXSOeAS6pO1o/view?usp=sharing

 

Unit Plan; Lesson Plan 5:

Fifth Day – Defense

Purpose

  • The purpose of this lesson is to familiarize the concept of defense mechanisms in terms of adaptations and life processes, building upon prior knowledge, as well as introducing new ideas.
  • SOLs
    • Science: Life – Processes: 3.4
      The student will investigate and understand that adaptations allow animals to satisfy life needs and respond to the environment. Key concepts include
    • a) Behavior adaptations and;
    • b) Physical adaptations

Objective

  • Third grade students will be able to demonstrate an understanding animal defense mechanisms, given a blank concept map to create as a class and a drawing and describing four box organizer activity with 85-90% accuracy.

Procedure

Introduction

  • Hook the class with a brain break to begin. Have them stand up and spread out. Ask them if they feel like they need to defend themselves when they feel scared or mad. Ask them to show you the first pose they would make if they were feeling scared or angry.
  • Then tell them that just like humans, animals feel like they need to defend themselves when they are scared or mad. Ask them to demonstrate with a partner how a lion would defend himself. After one minute, have the partners switch. Repeat this for owls, monkeys, and alligators.
  • Be sure to remind them that they must not touch anyone in the process of demonstrating.
  • Applaud them for working well together and sharing their knowledge. Have them take a seat.

Development

  • Ask them what they think a defense mechanism is and if they can give you an example of one. Then launch into the explanation that a defense mechanism is an automatic reaction of the body against disease-causing organisms or a mental process (e.g., repression or projection) initiated, typically unconsciously, to avoid conscious conflict or anxiety.
  • Pass out a blank concept map and fill it in using the with the animals that you talked about in the day previously as examples. (Lions, monkeys, owls, and alligators)
  • Review your animals that you talked about the previous day. For each animal, review and branch off with its shelter. In the shelter bubble, or under shelter, have the students recap yesterday’s lesson with one fact that helps them remember the facts about shelter.
  • Make another branch coming off of the animal that goes to defense mechanisms. From this bubble, give a detailed explanation of the animal’s defense mechanism and what they use it for.
  • The students will also complete a four box drawing and describing worksheet that reviews the facts learned in our fame.
  • Give the students each a worksheet with four square organizer.
  • Each animal gets its own box and in the box they will be expected to draw a picture that includes facts learned from the book and stated on the graphic organizer.
  • Under each box, there will be a box where the students will describe the picture drawn using vocabulary terms learned in the book and used in the graphic organizer.

Summary

  • Review the facts discussed again.
  • Review by asking :
      • What is a defense mechanism?–How the body tries to protect itself in response to fear or danger
      • What kinds of things might cause fear or danger? Predators and Humans that are trying to study them or play with them
      • What are some examples of defense mechanisms? When a puffer fish puffs up in the water
      • Why is it important for animals to have defense mechanisms? So that can protect themselves when they are in danger.
      • Can you give me an example of an animal, its shelter, and why it finds shelter there and tis defense mechanism? –A lion seeks shelter under shady trees. They seek shelter here to provide them shelter from the sun and the heat. Lionesses find shelter in dens, caves, or thickets when they are giving birth to protect their young from cub predators. Their defense mechanisms include their intimidating size, sharp teeth and sharp claws. Their “prides,” and allowing predators to steal their kill.

Differentiation

  • For struggling students, the concept map will be handed out and the information will be filled in on the board for a visual and will be given verbally by the teacher. When they are making the four box organize, they will be allowed to use pictures or writing to explain their answers.
  • For our more advanced students, they will be given an opportunity to write about the animal on a separate sheet of paper in their science notebooks, telling more facts about the animal that they would like to remember, or creating a blurb that will help them remember what kind of shelter the animal lives in and why.

Materials

  • Teacher
    • Four box organizer
    • Pre-created concept map key
    • Wall/smartboard for projection
    • Smartboard or chalkboard
  • Student
    • Pencil and erasers
    • Paper
    • Glue Sticks
    • Scissors
    • Science notebooks/folders
    • Colored pencils
    • Markers

Evaluation

(Part A)

  • Student progress will be evaluated based on how well he or she participates in class review as well as filling in the concept map and whether or not the student correctly identified the animal defense mechanism four box organizer with 85-90% accuracy.

(Part B)

  • Did the students meet your objectives?

 

  • How do you know?

 

  • Did your lesson accommodate/address the needs of all of your learners?

 

  • What were the strengths of the lesson?

 

  • What were the weaknesses?

 

  • How would you change the lesson if you could teach it again?

Resources:

https://drive.google.com/a/mymail.vcu.edu/file/d/1izsmAAUVM_E9yah_4qbrGdTJi_k6ySjl/view?usp=sharing

 

Unit Plan; Lesson Plan 6

Sixth Day- Rearing Young

Purpose:

  • The students will learn different ways that animal parents take care of their young and the length of time that an animal parent is pregnant for.
  • SOLS:
    • Science: Life-Processes: 3.4 The student will investigate and understand that adaptations allow animals to satisfy life needs and respond to the environment. Key concepts include
      • a) behavioral adaptations; and
      • b) physical adaptations.
    •  Math 3.12 The student will identify equivalent periods of time, including relationships among days, months, and years, as well as minutes and hours.
    • Math 3.17 The student will
      • a) collect and organize data, using observations, and measurement, surveys, or experiments;
      • b) construct a line plot, a picture graph, or a bar graph to represent data; and
      • c) read and interpret the data represented in line plots, bar graphs, and picture graphs and write a sentence analyzing the data. 

Objective:

  • The student will be able to understand how animal parents rear their young and by calculating which animal stays pregnant the longest by completing given a bar graph worksheet with 90% accuracy.

Procedure:

  • Introduction:
    • The students will remain in their seats for this lesson.
    • The students will be hooked into the lesson by being asked what does a mother do for their babies.
    • The students will discuss this with their table groups. (Auditory)
    • After the discussion the students will then be directed to a large chart paper on the board. (Visual)
    • The chart paper will be labeled what a mother does for her baby.
    • The students will then be asked for what qualities should be written on the chart paper.
  • Development
    • After the chart is filled in the students will then be introduced to the term rearing young.
      • This means to raise their young.
    • The students will then learn the term pregnant.
      • To carry a baby.
    • The students will be handed a bar graph worksheet to fill out with their table groups.
      • The students will be given the data typed on an Excel spreadsheet that they must use to correctly fill out on their bar graph worksheet.  (Visual, Kin.)

     –       Summary

    –      For the closure of this lesson the students will be asked the questions on the

                       worksheet that was given to them to record accuracy.

    –      The students will then glue their worksheet into their science notebook for review.

                –      The students will then be asked to define rearing young and to be pregnant.

– Rearing young: taking care of children

– Pregnant: to carry a child

    – Differentiation:

    – For those students who struggle with putting the correct data in the bar graph

worksheet, the graph will be filled out visually for them and those students will just have to answer the questions below the graph on the given worksheet.

    –      For those students who complete their worksheet early may help the rest of their

table group with questions they may have.

Materials

    –      Students

                 –     Bar graph worksheet

     –     Pencils

                 –     Science notebooks

                 –     Glue Sticks

Evaluation

(Part A):

  • The student will be assessed on their participation during the discussion on how mothers take care of their babies, and their completion of the bar graph worksheet based on the data given with 90% accuracy.

Evaluation

(Part B):

  • Did the student meet your objectives?

 

  • How do you know?

 

  • Did your lesson accommodate/ address the needs of all your learners?

 

  • What were the strengths of your lesson?

 

  • What were the weaknesses?

 

  • How would you change the lesson if you could teach it again?

Resources:

https://docs.google.com/a/mymail.vcu.edu/document/d/1fDk3l1czaJUqopyAfqjvE9EZzArVgqhaEhQDYSHOVjM/edit?usp=sharing

https://docs.google.com/a/mymail.vcu.edu/document/d/1sCMo8Bz8ejCmLEbgWsTLy5hRQGjo8DpL17MYMKSqTUY/edit?usp=sharing

https://docs.google.com/a/mymail.vcu.edu/spreadsheets/d/1xvhZzExxDIkB0ShgX2e0fjrDVqLh04gjTmyUPJYXnJE/edit?usp=sharing

 

Unit Plan; Lesson Plan 7:

Seventh Day – Physical Adaptations Review

Purpose

  • Students will review all concepts of physical adaptations, gathering and storing food, finding shelter, defense, and rearing young, and demonstrate an understanding of them with subsequent activities.
  • SOLs
    • Science: Life – Processes: 3.4
      The student will investigate and understand that adaptations allow animals to satisfy life needs and respond to the environment. Key concepts include

      •  a) behavioral adaptations; and
      •  b) physical adaptations.
  • Physical Education – 3.1 The student will demonstrate mature form (all critical elements) for a variety of skills and apply skills in increasingly complex movement activities.
    •  a) Demonstrate the critical elements for overhand throw and catch using a variety of objects; control, stop, and kick ball to stationary and moving partners/objects; dribble with dominant/preferred hand/foot; pass a ball to a moving partner; strike ball/object with short handled implement upward and forward; strike/bat ball off tee (correct grip, side to target, hip rotation); jump/land horizontally (distance) and vertically (height).
    •  b)Demonstrate a self-turn rope sequence of four different jumps.
    •  c) Demonstrate simple dances in various formations.
    •  d) Perform an educational gymnastic sequence with balance, transfer of weight, travel, and change of direction.
    • e) Create and perform a dance sequence with different locomotor patterns, levels, shapes, pathways, and flow.

Objective

  • The students will be able to demonstrate an understanding of all four types of physical adaptations by correctly completing a fill in the blank worksheet given a review of the topic, a game and a discussion, and a worksheet with 80% accuracy.

Procedure

Introduction

  • The lesson will begin with the teacher asking all the students to get up out of their seats and stand in a large circle around the room, equally spread apart with .
  • Leave the students to wonder what is happening for a moment, no longer than a minute or so, before grabbing back the class’s attention and telling them that they are going to be playing a review game for the day.
  • Explain that this game will help them to review and remember the different types of physical adaptations:
    • Gathering and storing food
    • Finding shelter
    • Defense
    • Rearing young

Development

  • Begin the game by going over the rules.
    • Tell students that they will be playing a sort of ‘hot potato’ game.
    • Explain that they will have to toss the beanbag, over hand and gently, from one student to the next, going in a clockwise circle, while the music plays.
    • When the music stops, the student who is holding the bean bag then has to keep a hold of it and answer a question related adaptations.
    • Whether they are right or wrong does not matter, and incorrect answers will have the class help out by calling out the correct answer, and each student will remain in the circle until the game ends.
    • Start the music again and repeat the previous steps.
  • Once the steps are clearly stated, the rules for how to throw the bean bag and answer the questions is clearly stated and demonstrated, begin the game (Auditory, Kin).
  • Play the game, stopping the music every few moments to answer questions, until all the questions have been answered.
    • See attached document for questions & answers
  • When the game ends, have students take a few deep breathes and then return to their seats.
  • Then, pass out a fill in the blank worksheet to each student and tell them that they should work on filling it out (Visual).
  • Remind students that this is individual work and that they should flip their papers over once finished.

Summary

  • When everyone is finished with the activity, have students flip it over and go over the answers to each blank as a class (Visual, Auditory).
  • Allow students time to correct the answers.
  • Have them put their papers in their notebooks before finishing the lesson by asking students to tell you about the four different types of physical adaptations and what are some examples.

Differentiation

  • Struggling students have visual, auditory, and kinesthetic aids in the form of the game and the activity to work with.
  • Students who are struggling also have classmate help to answer questions during the game.
  • Students at the right level have all three learning styles catered to and can assist those who are struggling during the game.
  • Students who are ahead have a chance to help those who are struggling with the game.
  • Students who finish early could draw an animal and its adaptations on the back of their worksheet.

Materials

  • Teacher
    • Beanbag or small ball
    • Device to play music (Comp, Phone, Radio, Etc)
    • Music
    • Game questions answers worksheet
  • Student
    • Fill in the blank worksheet
    • Pencil
    • Science notebooks

Evaluation

(Part A)

  • Student knowledge will be assessed based on how correctly they complete, individually, the fill in the blank worksheet, based on the 80% accuracy target. Student learning will also be considered with the review and how well each student participates in the game.

(Part B)

  • Did the students meet your objectives?

 

  • How do you know?

 

  • Did your lesson accommodate/address the needs of all of your learners?

 

  • What were the strengths of the lesson?

 

  • What were the weaknesses?

 

  • How would you change the lesson if you could teach it again?

Resources:

https://docs.google.com/a/mymail.vcu.edu/document/d/124kei6lGECtlsp4mqaXdfpZw4YCET4_VQ2AJ0Kwj_UY/edit?usp=sharing

 

Unit Plan; Evaluation Assessment

Physical Adaptations Diorama

Project Description:

To demonstrate an understanding of physical adaptations, Science SOL 3.4, students will create a diorama depicting a specific animal of their choice and the adaptations that it needs to survive in its environment. Students will work in partners with this in class project to create a working three dimensional model for the animal of their choice, its environment, and at least three different physical adaptations that the animal uses to survive. The project will take place over a period of a week and contain several different, large steps for students to complete. To begin, students will need to decide, with their partner, on an animal that they would like to focus on. This choice will be approved by the teacher. Students will then complete a form asking questions about the animal, its environments, and its physical adaptations. Following this, students will use their form to help them create a working, three dimensional model using materials that the class has brought in and the teacher’s own art supplies. When finished, partners will present their project briefly to the class. The project will allow students to demonstrate their knowledge of physical adaptations, as well as introduce new examples of animals with these adaptations to their classmates.

Student Project Description:

You and a partner will make a 3-D model of an animal, its environment, and its adaptations, and then present it to the class. You and your partner will pick an animal and have it approved by the teacher. You will then fill out a form that asks questions about your animal using your notes and the netbooks. This will help you create your 3-D model. When your form is filled out and approved, you will then make your model. After your model is finished, you and your partner will then give a small presentation to the class and talk about what your animal is, where it lives, and how it adapts to live in its environment.

Name:__________________________________

 

Physical Adaptations Diorama Project Directions

 

Notes about the project

  • Students will be assigned partners in class to complete this project.
  • Students will have one week, five days, to complete the project in class.
  • This project will be 3-D with a shoebox as your base for the project.
  • I will have some materials for your project available to use, but you and your partner will need to bring extra materials.
  • You and your partner will present your completed diorama to the class, explaining what your animal is, its environment, and the physical adaptations used.

 

Steps for the project:

Day One:

  1. You and your partner will choose your animal and I will approve it and sign your Project Work Form.
  2. You and your partner will then fill out the questions on your Work Form handout, using your notes and the netbooks to look up information about your animal.
  3. Once your Work Form handout is filled in completely and I have approved all parts, you and your partner may start planning for your project and what materials you will need.

Day Two:

  1. Start with your shoebox and create the background environment for your animal. You will need to think about the adaptations when creating the background.

 

Day Three:

  1. Today you will work on creating your animal. Remember to think about the physical adaptations your animal needs to survive.

 

Day Four:

  1. This will be the last day to work on dioramas. You and your partner will be adding your physical adaptations and putting all the parts together.

 

Day Five:

  1. Presentation day!
  2. You and your partner will show the class your 3-D project and explain the animal and its environment with the physical adaptations used.

 

Names: _______________ and _________________

 

Physical Adaptations Diorama Project Work Form

Your animal is:___________________________________________________

 

  • Teacher Signature: ____________________________________

 

Their environment is:______________________________________________

 

What three physical adaptations will be presented in your 3-D project?

(Finding Shelter, Gathering and Storing Food, Rearing Young, Defense)

 

1.___________________________________________________________________

 

2.___________________________________________________________________

 

3.___________________________________________________________________

 

How does your animal show these adaptations? Give an example. (These are same adaptations from above)

 

1.___________________________________________________________________

 

_____________________________________________________________________

 

2.___________________________________________________________________

 

_____________________________________________________________________

 

3.___________________________________________________________________

 

_____________________________________________________________________

 

Teacher Approval Signature:______________________________________________

 

Name:____________________________

 

Physical Adaptations Diorama Project Rubric

 

Project Component Possible Points Earned Points Comments
You and your partner picked an animal and had it approved 5
Your work form is fully completed with good details about your animal, the environment, and the animal’s physical adaptations 5
Your 3-D model shows the animal, its environment, and its adaptations clearly 30
Your 3-D model is fun, creative, and shows effort 20
Your presentation was clear, loud, and you and your partner both spoke 5
Your presentation told the class about your animal, the environment, and the animal’s adaptations 10
Total Points:

___ /75

 

Additional Resources for Lesson

Science 3.4 – Life Processes, Physical Adaptations

Websites

  1. http://www.monkeyworlds.com/monkey-habitat/

This Website gives all kinds of information on monkeys. It talks about their habitats as well as breeding habits and how it affects their habitats and places of shelter. This  resource could be used to gather information on shelter and breeding habits focusing primarily on monkeys.

2.https://www.pinterest.com/pin/315955730080391651/?lp=true

This is an animal adaptation matching game. For this game the students will need to have a background in animals and their adaptations so I think that this would best be used as a review game.

3.https://www.leisurepro.com/blog/explore-the-blue/5-awesome-marine-animal-defense-mechanisms/#

This website is a great resource to learn about marine life and some of their defense mechanisms. I would use this as background information to help plan the lesson or create an activity.

4.https://www.thoughtco.com/what-is-a-defense-mechanism-373406

This website is a great resource to gain background  knowledge. I would use this to help me better understand what to teach my students and to help me figure out what kind of activity I would like them to complete.

Videos

1.https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZmwCGEnuoqo

This video is a great video that teaches about animals and their habitats. This could be used as an introduction to the lesson or for a review.

2.https://www.brainpop.com/science/ecologyandbehavior/camouflage/

Students loves watching BrainPOP videos in class so this would be a great video to use during the lesson with camouflage. They can learn vocabulary and examples of this physical behavior.

Art

1.Chameleon Camouflage Plate

tippytoecrafts.blogspot.com

This is a fun idea for an art project, where students create a color changing chameleon with two plates and a pin. This is an activity that not only would help to reinforce one of the key concepts, as mentioned by the SOL, camouflage, with the students, but also help to incorporate fine arts into their learning as well. They could even use specific colors to represent certain terrains and pull in geography and a social studies SOL as well.

  1. Hibernation Bear

cuttingtinybites.com

The students could create their own bear during the lesson on hibernation. Usually when students think of hibernation they think of bears gathering and storing food for the winter. The students can create a story explaining what happens when winter starts for the bear. This helps the students look over the different behaviors the bear has during this time.

  1. Porcupine Quill Clay Model

http://earlylearning.momtrusted.com/2013/03/toothpick-porcupines/

The students can make a model of a porcupine using modeling clay. They can use toothpicks to stick into the clay porcupines and can learn how they use their quills against predators. This artwork would go great with the defense lesson.

Books

1.Traits for Survival by Dona Herweck Rice

This is a simple book that focuses on animals have to adapt in order to live and survive. It touches on all different types of adaptations from camouflage to migration, and should be able to give students a more in depth understanding about the specific types.

2.I See a Kookaburra! by Steve Jenkins & Robin Page

This is a book based on animal adaptations that focuses on six specific areas in the world and the different adaptations that animals that live there may have developed. This could help students to better understand that there are different kinds of adaptations animals undertake depending on where they are from, as well as help them to see the diversity of different adaptations in the world in general.

  1. Animal Defenses by Christina Wilson

This book can be used during a read aloud during the language arts block that can tie into the defense lesson of the day. This is a good way to have a reading time for the students to pay attention then make a connection later in the day when learning about defense in science.

Field Trips

1.Field Trip to the Zoo

This should help students to gain a visual understanding of how animals adapt and live in their environments. Not only can they see the animals and how they interact, but they can also work to draw conclusions about an animal’s habits because of such visuals.

2.Field Trip to a local National Park/ Nature based park

With this kind of trip, students could be challenged to see what kinds of animals they can find, and then try and identify the different types of physical adaptations that each animal is displaying.

Songs

  1. “Habitats”

Where would you live if you were a cat?

Would it be in a cave, would you live like a bat?

I’m pretty sure most cats would have none of that.

That’s not the right habitat for a cat.

 

A habitat’s the natural neighborhood where plants and animals get water and food. And a cat would find some of these places no good. We will describe places where you can put your cat. Can you guess the habitat?

 

In this habitat it gets hot in the day

So dawn or at dusk is when creatures can play

The animals that live here never see much rain

Some get water from cactus, which can be quite a pain

What kind of habitat is that?

That’s what it’s like in the DESERT

 

Thick fur and feathers or layers of fat

Are needed in this long, winter habitat.

Short, compact animals are the kind that are found

And the few plants that grow stay close to the ground.

What kind of habitat is that?

It’s cold and harsh in the TUNDRA

 

This habitat stretches into the sky

And there’s not much oxygen when you get up high.

The climate can be different on the opposite side

And the top can be snowy while the base is dry.

What kind of habitat is that?

Is it the right habitat for a cat?

Only if she likes the MOUNTAINS

 

Medicines, rubber, chocolate and more

Come from this warm, wet climate with species galore.

Emergent, canopy, understory and floor

Are layers that make up this habitat’s core.

What kind of habitat is that?

It sounds like the TROPICAL RAINFOREST

 

This habitat goes through the change of 4 seasons

So adaptable animals live in this region.

Logging and housing are the primary reasons

It is being chopped down; re-growth can take eons.

What kind of habitat is that?

This is the TEMPERATE FOREST

 

The next habitat has a surface and floor,

A dark, deep middle where the light is no more.

Food always trickles down from top to below

It’s the biggest and wettest that you’ll ever know.

What kind of habitat is that?

No cat wants to live in the OCEAN

 

It rains pretty hard in this place twice a year.

With few trees around, plants grow fast in the clear.

It attracts grazing animals that walk on all fours.

There’s plenty to eat for these large herbivores.

What kind of habitat is that?

Is it the right habitat for a cat?

Only if she likes the GRASSLANDS

 

So where would you like to put your cat?

What is the right kind of habitat?

What habitat is a lap?

That’s mostly where I find my cat!

Source of song:

http://www.totally3rdgrade.com/habitats.html

This song would be great to learn in parts because of the length. This song explains different qualities that an animal needs to survive in different areas with different types of weather and food sources.

TEDU 414 – Multicultural Lesson Plan (Math Centered)

This is a lesson plan created for TEDU 414 that focuses on incorporating a diversity based element into a lesson for a class. This particular lesson is focused on math, bar graphs, with an incorporation of diversity within it.

Diversity Incorporated Lesson Plan

Purpose

         Students will gain an understanding of what a bar graph is, its parts, and how to create one. This will allow them to better understand and use information, in the form of graphs, in both school and real life applications. The graphing will be facilitated with the theme of diversity, in which the graph’s content will reflect the various foods of the world and how the students have or have not experienced them.  

         SOL: 3.17

The student will
a) collect and organize data, using observations, measurements, surveys, or experiments;
b) construct a line plot, a picture graph, or a bar graph to represent the data; and
c) read and interpret the data represented in line plots, bar graphs, and picture graphs and
write a sentence analyzing the data.

Objective

         The student will be able to correctly construct a bar graph and interpret the data of one through questions given a blank, graphing worksheet, a diversity based theme, and an example graph without error.

Procedure

         Introduction:

o   The lesson will begin with the teacher introducing the learning target(s) for the day and have the students read along, out loud.

  • 1. I can collect and organize data.
  • 2. I can construct a bar graph and include all necessary parts (title, axis, interval, labels, spaces).
  • 3. I can analyze bar graphs and pictographs and write at least one sentence about the data.

o   Students should be asked what they know about both bar graphs and diversity, sharing their prior knowledge with the class.

         Development:

o   Have the class convene in a group near the white board or e chart paper.

o   Introduce the book Whoever You Are and read it aloud to the class.

o   Afterwards, relate the concept, that everyone is different, but we all enjoy the same things, to the lesson by telling the class that everyone has tried some sort of food from a different place in their lifetime.

o   Tell them that the class is going to prove it by creating a bar graph and explain what a bar graph is. Be sure to talk about the different parts of a bar graph as well (TAILS) (aural learning).

  • A bar graph is a type of graph using big bars to represent an amount of something in a category. They are used to compare data of different categories.
  • T – Title, A – Axises (they do not need to know the specific names, just that there are two axises), I – Intervals (rate of increase), L – Labels, S – Spaces (bars are not on top of each other)

o   Using the whiteboard or chart paper, model creating a bar graph for the class. Be sure to go over each of the parts as you create it, telling the class and writing down what the title, axises, labels, spaces, and the intervals are (visual learning).

o   Then write in four different categories at the bottom related to foods around the world, such as:

  • Spaghetti, Sushi, Tacos, and Fish & Chips (any combination will work)

o   Ask the class to raise their hands if they have ever had the different foods, and then record the information on the graph (interpersonal learning).

o   Allow the students to see the data and then ask them the following questions (at least two);

  • Which food have the most students in our class eaten?
  • Together, which two foods have the most students tried?
  • How many more people have tried (insert food) than (insert second food)?
  • Why do you think we eat so many different foods from different places? (diversity link)

o  Next have students return to their seats and ask them to construct a bar graph of their own based on the following question about these different foods and consequent data (on tally chart linked below):

  • “Have you ever tried Chinese food, Hamburgers, Frog legs, or Pizza?”

o   Pass out the blank graphing worksheet, one per student.

o   Allow them to set up a bar graph, using the one you did as a class as an example. Be sure to give them the interval to use.

o   Once that is done, allow time for students to construct their bar graphs based off of the info. Remind them that this is individual work (intrapersonal learning).

o   When finished students should turn over their papers.

         Summary:

o   End the lesson by having each student answer a question about a bar graph as an exit ticket (logical learning).

O Write the following question:

  • Which two foods have people tried a total of thirty times together?

o Have students answer the questions on the back of their graphing worksheet and turn them in when they are finished. Be sure to review the exit ticket question as a class.

         Differentiation

o   Students who finish early can work on coming up with their own questions that might be able to use a bar graph to answer.

O Students who finish early can practice constructing bar graphs and labeling the different parts.

o   Students who struggling could have teacher assistance

o   Students who are struggling could have assistance from students who have already finished help

Materials

         Teacher

o   The book; Whoever You Are by Mem Fox

o   Access to a whiteboard or chart paper

o   Writing tool; expo maker, pen, pencil, etc.

         Students

o   Blank graphing worksheet (see below)

o   Pencil

Evaluation

(Part A)

–          Students will be assessed by the bar graph and the exit ticket that they turn in. Student work will be evaluated and learning progress will be considered based on whether or not they have correctly created and organized their bar graph, and whether or not they have correctly answered the question to the exit ticket.

(Part B)
Did the students meet your objectives?

How do you know?

Did your lesson accommodate/address the needs of all of your learners?

What were the strengths of the lesson?

What were the weaknesses?

How would you change the lesson if you could teach it again?

Bar graph worksheet courtesy of Education.com

 

Tally Chart with Food Data