• How is, the NSA’s incorporating of their PRISM surveillance program effect the American people, and why should the American people know about such programs.
    The American people need to know about how the NSA’s […]

  • How is, the NSA’s incorporating of their PRISM surveillance program effect the American people, and why should the American people know about such programs.

    The American people need to know about how the NSA’s […]

  • Part I:
    The process of the NSA implementing their domestic surveillance by using their PRISM surveillance program through Google searches directly effects the American people, and thus merits the right of the […]

  • Part I:

    The process of the NSA implementing their domestic surveillance by using their PRISM surveillance program through Google searches directly effects the American people, and thus merits the right of the […]

  • Link#1:
    Ware, W. SECURITY AND PRIVACY IN COMPUTER SYSTEMS. Computer Law and Security Review: The International Journal of Technology and Practice, 27, 1-28. Retrieved July 15, 2014, from […]

  • Link#1:

    Ware, W. SECURITY AND PRIVACY IN COMPUTER SYSTEMS. Computer Law and Security Review: The International Journal of Technology and Practice, 27, 1-28. Retrieved July 15, 2014, from […]

  • Thumbnail“The prescience of Kay and Goldberg’s vision was such that almost all the specific ideas for the uses of notebook computing developed in the group that Kay directed at Xerox Palo Alto Research Center (PARC) proved […]

  • abdulabdo wrote a new post, Nugget#6, on the site abdulabdo 5 years, 12 months ago

    Thumbnail“The prescience of Kay and Goldberg’s vision was such that almost all the specific ideas for the uses of notebook computing developed in the group that Kay directed at Xerox Palo Alto Research Center (PARC) proved […]

  • Part I:
    From the moment I read the article about Facebook controlling people’s emotions like that through their own manipulation of Facebook data and metadata with their so called already given consumer “consent”, […]

  • Part I:

    From the moment I read the article about Facebook controlling people’s emotions like that through their own manipulation of Facebook data and metadata with their so called already given consumer “consent”, I immediately thought about my own research and how the NSA was gathering all sorts data from the American people, essentially undetected as first without the American people knowing. And as I was creating the multimedia project, I have noticed that I took an almost exact same approach to this multimedia project as I did with the research that I have been doing  thus far. I usually first tend to highlight and explain the main core points that are being stated with links and further explanations. And then I move on to other topics that help to bolster the explanation of the main theme of multimedia project/research that I’m conducting, and I may even use links or videos to illustrate this. The five most important decisions that I took in terms of my specific choices of links, images and the other digital tools and media are as followed. First, is the material that I’m about to use relevant to my topic. Second, is the material that I’m about to choice relevant to me getting the point across to the readers. Third, how can I incorporate this into my already written literature to make it seem to flow nicely with the literature already present. Fourth, did I make this all available and easy to understand for the reader, of what I’m truly trying to say here. Fifth, did I sell this off nicely to the reader, would the reader be satisfied if he or she had read this, what would be their first reactions. Note that all of these steps work like the increments on the gears of a bike, in order to move forward each step has to be completed or revised in order for the next to began. I choose to make the links where I made them because I thought to me and to the readers, that they would make sense and help elaborate more on the issue being discussed, and also help raise the standings of the literature that is being presented to the readers. I selected the images that I used from various websites but mainly from Google images itself, and I decided to put them where I thought the subject was about to change and the reader needed a break and take a look at some images, because one image can say way more than one word can. One think that I did outside the box I think is giving a link about the Facebook data research scientist, Adam Kramer himself.

    Part II:

    The design of my final inquiry project I think will be much larger then this multimedia project but have some of the key attributes to it as stated in Part I of this reflective writing. The inquiry project will be very detail-orientated about discussing the research question, and at the end present a question that is left up to the reader to decide what the answer should be to that particular question. The tools that I will use are scholarly articles (specifically quotes), videos discussing the issue(s) that are being presented, and helpful links to specify and make the reading easier on the reader. All these tools will help refine the major claim my research it trying to argue. This will probably reside on the internet next to the many analyzes and dissections about security versus privacy issues, the NSA, and also under Amendment given rights. What is unique about this research is that it can encompass so much yet stay within the guidelines of the course requirements about being a new media topic. What will be unique in this inquiry project assignment besides the images, links, and published videos, will be the many important quotes given by real everyday people, the quotes given by scholarly articles, and most importantly the many unexpected connections, made in my inquiry project that most wouldn’t even dream that there was a connection until now.

    **Here are just some pieces of writing I might model into my inquiry project after, link#1, link#2, and link#3 (just to name a few).**

  • Link#1:
    Mansfield-Devine, S. Monitoring communications: the false positive problem. Computer Fraud & Security, 2013, 5-11. Retrieved July 11, 2014, from […]

  • abdulabdo wrote a new post, Research Nugget #3, on the site abdulabdo 6 years ago

    Link#1:

    Mansfield-Devine, S. Monitoring communications: the false positive problem. Computer Fraud & Security, 2013, 5-11. Retrieved July 11, 2014, from http://www.sciencedirect.com.proxy.library.vcu.edu/science/article/pii/S1361372313700794

    The main claim of the article is to explain on events that occurred revolving the NSA’s intelligence gathering leaks by Snowden and discuss the deep implications of what this event truly had on many people and not just the government and its reputation. The article also goes as far as to hint at a possible solution, to be able to see abnormal activities within a given system.

    Nugget:

    “The greatest effect has been that erosion of trust, and this has manifested itself in a number of ways, ranging from the closing down of businesses to at least one bizarre spectacle. Lavabit, a company that provided secure email services, shut down its offering saying that it could no longer guarantee users’ privacy. This was quickly followed by Silent Circle doing the same thing (although the company continues to offer secure voice and SMS services, which use peer-to-peer encryption and leave no sensitive information on servers). Silent Circle’s CEO, in an interview for the ContraRisk podcast, explained that email protocols involve too much metadata that cannot be adequately secured.”

    This explains one of the most damaging effects, the NSA leaks has on our society. The literal loss of trust that the people have grown towards the NSA has manifested itself onto reality. Jobs are lost as a result and ultimately businesses fail and fall apart as they can no longer promise their customers security and privacy they crave for, their sensitive and valuable information. The repercussions of this event, may even lead some to wish that Snowden never leaked those NSA domestic surveillance programs.

    Nugget:

    “Both false positives (unnecessarily generating an alert or appearing to find a connection where none exists) and false negatives (missing the very thing you’re looking for) are problems in all systems that analyze data…With an intelligence system, a false positive could lead to you being investigated, questioned and even arrested. In one infamous case, that of Canadian Muslim Maher Arar, a false positive (albeit not automatically generated by computer) led to an innocent person being rendered to Syria and kept in jail for more than 10 months, where he was tortured…”There is no doubt that there is room for confusion of a kind where someone has a particular name, someone’s being tracked, there’s some sort of a false positive in cyberspace associated with them, and that could lead to something really unfortunate,” says Shaikh…Aside from the potential consequences for people being monitored, there’s another very good reason for striving to avoid false positives, and one that has not been a significant part of the debate around Prism and the other surveillance programs – and that’s cost.”

    This illustrates the differences between false positives and false negatives, both of which are common terms used when speaking about intelligence organizations, and as such will be used in this research. This research is mainly concerned about false positives. The implications of false positives can be severe as stated in the nugget above. But also programs like Prism as stated above, tend to have many false positives within them, and have massive costs that are very hard to alleviate from, both for governmental and non-governmental peoples alike. False positives might even actually cause false negatives as focus is directed to somewhere else, while truly vital data to intelligence gathering agency is ultimately unfortunately missed by the intelligence agency itself. Shaikh later discusses  in the article that false positives should be avoided by intelligence agency at all times, as this effects all of us, not just the agency.

    Link#2:

    Stein, J. The End of National Security Reporting?. IEEE SECURITY & PRIVACY, 11, 64-68. Retrieved July 11, 2014, from http://ieeexplore.ieee.org.proxy.library.vcu.edu/stamp/stamp.jsp?tp=&arnumber=6573292

    The main claim of the article is expose the difficulty that reporters, in our society have in revealing government related information to the public.

    Nugget:

    “In federal court, especially in cases involving national security, reporters had nothing but the First Amendment to protect them from having to reveal sources-a thin reed these days. We could only hope the courts sided with us, lest we go to jail.”

    This illustrates just how hard government makes it, on reporters these days to report vital information to the public. Reporters literally have to rely on the First Amendment and the good will and judgment of courts in order to just continue their career, and this especially is true when matters of security are involved. So it can be said that without a doubt that the information that was leaked from the NSA about privacy issues and security were obtained for the public after lots of hard work and scrutiny that the reporters had to endure.

    Nugget:

    “Attorney General Alberto Gonzales suggested that the Department of Justice might prosecute two New York Times correspondents, James Risen and Eric Lichtblau, for reporting that “President Bush secretly authorized the National Security Agency to eavesdrop on Americans… to search for evidence of terrorist activity without the court-approved warrants ordinarily required for domestic spying”…”In my 20 years of covering public policy, I have never felt so constrained in my ability to talk to sources and gather information as I do now,” Marisa Taylor, a national security reporter in McClatchy newpapers’ Washington bureau, said by email. “Many sources are afraid to be caught talking to a reporter even about unclassified matters that they believe the public has a right to know.””

    This illustrate that the issue of the NSA and its leaked information about domestic surveillance on Americans is one of the many core topics being stated when difficultly of reporters reporting comes to discussion. A major type of difficulty that reporters face can be a lack of the source’s cooperation, which may effect their reporting. Also illustrated is the sheer difficultly that reporters have now more than ever in reporting. It can be seen that as time progresses so does the difficulty of reporting to the American people.

    Link#3:

    Taslitz, A. (2002). The Fourth Amendment in the twenty-first century: Technology, Privacy, and human emotions. Law and Contemporary Problems. Durham: Duke University School of Law.

    The author’s main claim is to address the conflicting issues our society faces regarding the many clashes between 4th Amendment advocates and surveillance agencies over privacy and security.

    Nugget:

    “Indeed, to read most United States Supreme Court case law under the Fourth Amendment, one would be hard-pressed to see any mention or other indication of understanding of the indignation felt by people like the protesting Ybor City residents or Judge Kozinski. The Court generally, though not always, conceives of privacy as a cognitively driven issue, divorced from human emotion.”

    This illustrates how the United States Supreme Court cases operate under issues that pertain to the fourth amendment. When looking into cases like these one needs to (including judges) put more thought into the perspective of the people that are being victimized by having their privacy breached by the agencies. This also illustrates one of many routes courts take when confronting the privacy issue.

    Nugget: 

    “Privacy in the information age is best conceived as the maintenance of metaphorical boundaries that define the contours of personal identity. Identity is complex; different circumstances reveal different aspects of our nature. Each of us wears many masks wherein each mask reflects a different aspect of who we really are. We do not want our entire natures to be judged by any one mask, nor do we want partial revelations of our activities to define us in a particular situation as other than who we want to be. In short, we want to choose the masks that we show to others; any such loss of choice is painful, amounting almost to a physical violation of the self. When we are secretly watched, or when information that we choose to reveal to one audience is instead exposed to another, we lose that sense of choice.”

    This illustrates exactly what the privacy issue is all about. And in an age of highly advanced techniques combined with highly advanced technology, agencies like the NSA truly do have the power to oversee all, and many could even fear the events of what occurred in George Orwell’s novel 1984, come to fruition. The creation of privacy itself is truly a cognitive creation and exists in the cognitive world, but is vital and has great and vast implications in reality as we know it.

    Synthesis:

    All three articles relate to one another and help to illustrate the privacy issue and the relatively recent events that revolve around it. These articles allowed us to capture and conceive events related to privacy that were never before seen in this research until now, like how hard it really is for reporters to report so that they can help protect the interests of the American people. So many topics can be unexpectedly, related to the privacy issues, like business shut downs, reporters finding it difficult to do their jobs, and loss of trust to agencies that unintentionally make the people blame and distrust the government which has negative implications for everyone. After this research I know realize that the NSA and the privacy issues linked to it goes far deeper and more complex and intertwined with itself more than I could have ever anticipated. Even recently I have heard on the news on CNN that the NSA has been caught spying on 5 American-Muslim leaders, that in the news itself have come to the conclusion of that they were wrongly accused and spied on for potential terrorist activities, because of just being Muslims.  Here is the link to the video pertaining to this.

    http://www.cnn.com/2014/07/09/us/muslim-spying-allegations/index.html

    **Please note that APA citation was used from the information provided in each source and was done to the best of my ability**

  • ThumbnailFacebook tinkered with users’ feeds for a massive psychology experiment

    By William Hughes
    Jun 27, 2014 3:30 PM

    Scientists at Facebook have published a paper showing that they manipulated the content […]

  • abdulabdo wrote a new post, Concept Experience #5, on the site abdulabdo 6 years ago

    ThumbnailFacebook tinkered with users’ feeds for a massive psychology experiment

    By William Hughes
    Jun 27, 2014 3:30 PM

    Scientists at Facebook have published a paper showing that they manipulated the […]

    • replied 6 years ago

      Your hyperlinks were very helpful in fully understanding what the article is talking about. When I first read the article (with no hyperlinks) it was slightly unclear and vague. Your links are some I haven’t seen yet, such as the one about twitter. It was very interesting to read.