• Link
    Thanks for reading!

  • lilyg wrote a new post, Inquiry Project, on the site The Blog 5 years, 11 months ago

    Link

    Thanks for reading!

  • How will 3D printing change college biology courses?
    I believe 3D printing will further enrich the learning environment of college biology students because…

    Names of Authors
    Answer #1they will be able to learn […]

  • lilyg wrote a new post, Synthesis Matrix, on the site The Blog 5 years, 11 months ago

    How will 3D printing change college biology courses?

    I believe 3D printing will further enrich the learning environment of college biology students because…

    Names of Authors
    Answer #1they will be able to learn modern skills and obtain knowledge about 3D printing that will help them further in their career for example being able to print organs and further examine living tumors
    Answer #2they will be able to experience hands-on learning which is important for biology students who are going into the medical field
    Answer #3using this kind of technology gets students excited about learning. Being able to use their creativity while learning about biology will enhance their own personal connections to the material
    Answer #4 3D printing can be accessible and helpful to all types of students
    Answer #5

    Author 1
    Hod Lipson

    discusses teaching the basics of printing 3D models
    this source is very focused on hands-on learning, says 90% of knowledge is retained with concrete experience

    talks about how students with visual disabilities are able to use 3D models as aids

    Author 2 
    Johnson, L., Adams, S., Cummins, M., Estrada, V., Freeman, A. & Ludgate, H

    this source  specifically talks about medical schools using 3D printing to create artificial body parts
    like the previous answer, medical schools are using 3D printers, this is hands on learning

    discusses prices of different 3D printers- cost not too high for many schools

    Author 3
    Vincent F. Scalfan & Josh Sahib

    discusses an actual study about 3D printing in Alabama University’s library-students from different majors were getting trained how to operate printer
    states that 3D models make technology “instantly tangible” and comments on how picking up an object to study it is much different than looking at a 2D figure
     the study found that many students from all backgrounds of study were interested in learning more and in the end found the technology useful
    putting printers in libraries makes this technology available to all students and faculty of the school

    Author 4 
    Bethany Gross

    3D printing can be used for surgical preparation, meaning surgeon can look at 3D model of patient beforehand- good for medical schools?
     studies have shown students were able to understand material better with 3D models

    Author 5

    through 3D printing studios, students can learn independent work as well as the basics of 3D printing
     constant hands-n work, which this author feels has been neglected in our current education system

    labs could create an environment where any student feels welcome to learn 3D printing skillls

    Author 6
    Knapp, Mary E., Ryan Wolff, and Hod Lipson

     discusses how models have been shown to enhance learning

    this article also talks about how it helps the visually impaired

    Author 7
    Faulstick, Britt

     students are able to print living tissue in medical school- a skill that may be very important later in their career
     creating tumors and living tissue is a great example of hands-on learning because students are able to work with organs without potentially causing harm to a living person

    Author 8
    Fiona Berry

     free programs like this give so many access to this type of technology

     

    Author 1 – Lipson, Hod. “Printable 3d models for customized hands-on education.” Mass Customization and Personalization (MCPC) (2007).

    Author 2 – Johnson, L., Adams, S., Cummins, M., Estrada, V., Freeman, A. & Ludgate, H. (2013). The NMC Horizon Report: 2013 Higher Education Edition. NMC.

    Author 3- Scalfani, Vincent F., and Josh Sahib. “A model for managing 3D printing services in academic libraries.” Issues in Science and Technology Librarianship. 2013.

    Author 4- Gross, Bethany C., et al. “Evaluation of 3d printing and its potential impact on biotechnology and the chemical sciences.” Analytical chemistry 86.7 (2014): 3240-3253.

    Author 5- Loy, Jennifer. “eLearning and eMaking: 3D Printing Blurring the Digital and the Physical.” Education Sciences 4.1 (2014): 108-121.

    Author 6- Knapp, Mary E., Ryan Wolff, and Hod Lipson. “Developing printable content: A repository for printable teaching models.” Proceedings of the 19th Annual Solid Freeform Fabrication Symposium, Austin TX. 2008.

    Author 7- Faulstick, Britt. “3D printing cancer tumors.” Drexel University. N.p., 24 Apr. 2014. Web. 8 July 2014. <http://drexel.edu/now/news-media/releases/archive/2014/April/3Dprintingtumors/&gt;.

    Author 8- Berry, Fiona. “NIH 3D printer project to allow public to create drug models.” in-PharmaTechnologist.com. N.p., 23 June 2014. Web. 21 July 2014. <http://www.in-pharmatechnologist.com/Processing/NIH-3D-printer-project-to-allow-public-to-create-drug-models&gt;.

     

    I see a lot of gaps in the last few sources because I think I was just finding less sources that were directly about my topic. For example, if I used a source that had nothing to do with students, it was hard to fill in some of the matrix.  I believe I have enough for all my subclaims, even though my “gets students excited” claim is a little on the skinny side. I really stand by that reason, so I will probably try and do more research solely for this claim, even though it might be a little tricky. I may end up incorporating it into another subclaim if I can smoothly. Overall, this was a really great way to organize everything because I wasn’t realizing just how much information I was collecting and it was getting messy. I think some more research can be done, but I definitely have a good bulk of information.

  • Step I:
    I believe 3D printing will further enrich the learning environment of college biology students because…
    -they will be able to learn skills and obtain knowledge about 3D printing that will help them further […]

  • Step I:

    I believe 3D printing will further enrich the learning environment of college biology students because…

    -they will be able to learn skills and obtain knowledge about 3D printing that will help them […]

  • ThumbnailPersonal Dynamic Media is an essay written in 1977 by Alan Kay and Adele Goldberg, The main idea of their essay is a machine called a Dynabook, an electronic device used for writing, drawing, editing, among other […]

  • Personal Dynamic Media is an essay written in 1977 by Alan Kay and Adele Goldberg, The main idea of their essay is a machine called a Dynabook, an electronic device used for writing, drawing, editing, among other things. It reminds me of a laptop or an electronic tablet (iPad).

    The nugget I chose was:

    “What would happen in a world in which everyone had a
    Dynabook? If such a machine were designed in a way that
    any owner could mold and channel its power to his own
    needs, then a new kind of medium would have been created:
    a metamedium, whose content would be a wide range of
    already-existing and not-yet-invented media.”

    It’s interesting to read some of the essays we’ve read as a class and know to some extent, answers to questions the authors ask. We now live in the world where we have technology like the Dynabook and it’s safe to say, it’s even more advanced. While it’s unfortunate that not everyone in the world has access to such technology, the amount of people who do own tablets, laptops or smartphones is large.  Such machines can be personalized by whatever content the owner choses, which follows what Kay and Goldberg expressed when they wrote, “mold and channel its power to his own needs”. Many of these technologies are also able to be used for writing and drawing and other creative endeavors, just like the Dynabook was intended to do.

    I can connect this essay to all the other essays we’ve read because Personal Dynamic Media is about using an advanced piece of technology to express creativity of the human mind. I can also connect it to my inquiry project  because the same idea is applied to 3D printing.

  • Part 1: When I first read the assignment, I was a little confused, but then I realized that you were asking us to apply what we usually do to our nuggets (make them interesting and robust) and use it on this article. I thought it was a fun assignment and I liked the article that was chosen because I had heard about what had happened with Facebook’s experiment, but I hadn’t read into it. The first thing I linked was in the first sentence of the article. I thought it would be good to connect to another article that described what was going on and I linked to a very recent article that would describe the experiment as well as the current repercussions. The second thing i linked to was in the section about Facebook’s data policy. I used a Times article about other instances where Facebook has come under fire for questionable uses of user data. I thought it would be a good idea to further the idea of Facebook’s controversial policies and decisions. The third item I linked was at the very end of the second paragraph. I felt it didn’t really fit in the actual paragraph, but it felt like it went well at the end because it was an article about how the journal that published the study was concerned about the ethics of the experiment. Apparently, it’s also very rare for a journal to do such a thing.  Another article I linked to was in the section where Adam Kramer described Facebook as “largest field study”. I linked to a Forbes article about many other studies that have been done involving Facebook. Though, I’m assuming, with everyone’s knowledge and consent. I also used an image at the end that was a close-up of an eye with Facebook’s logo in its reflection. I thought it looked cool and it sort of made me think of the fact that Facebook is everywhere. We’re not even looking at the computer screen this person is looking at, yet we still see the logo. I’m not sure I did anything particularly out of the box, but I did use a gif of Ron Burgendy in his “glass case of emotion”. I think I was trying to liven up the article and add some humor. I think the manipulation Facebook used was unethical and kind of creepy, but as someone who is slowly fading out of the Facebook trend, I can’t take anything related to it too seriously, mainly because I just don’t use it extensively.

    Part II: When I was figuring out my new topic, it sort of came to mind “Wait,  it’s completely possible that I could find and use a 3D printer.” And then I remembered how we’re supposed to make this more than a piece of writing. So, I’m planning on going out and seeing the 3D printing process myself. I’ll take pictures and videos and I would also love to interview instructors and professors that use 3D printing or could use 3D printing and see how they feel about using it in college courses.  I assuming it will mainly reside on my blog and YouTube. I’m imagining it will have a lot of video, gifs( hopefully), interview text and images except many of them will be my own.

  • Part 1: When I first read the assignment, I was a little confused, but then I realized that you were asking us to apply what we usually do to our nuggets (make them interesting and robust) and use it on this article. I thought it was a fun assignment and I liked the article that was chosen because I had heard about what had happened with Facebook’s experiment, but I hadn’t read into it. The first thing I linked was in the first sentence of the article. I thought it would be good to connect to another article that described what was going on and I linked to a very recent article that would describe the experiment as well as the current repercussions. The second thing i linked to was in the section about Facebook’s data policy. I used a Times article about other instances where Facebook has come under fire for questionable uses of user data. I thought it would be a good idea to further the idea of Facebook’s controversial policies and decisions. The third item I linked was at the very end of the second paragraph. I felt it didn’t really fit in the actual paragraph, but it felt like it went well at the end because it was an article about how the journal that published the study was concerned about the ethics of the experiment. Apparently, it’s also very rare for a journal to do such a thing.  Another article I linked to was in the section where Adam Kramer described Facebook as “largest field study”. I linked to a Forbes article about many other studies that have been done involving Facebook. Though, I’m assuming, with everyone’s knowledge and consent. I also used an image at the end that was a close-up of an eye with Facebook’s logo in its reflection. I thought it looked cool and it sort of made me think of the fact that Facebook is everywhere. We’re not even looking at the computer screen this person is looking at, yet we still see the logo. I’m not sure I did anything particularly out of the box, but I did use a gif of Ron Burgendy in his “glass case of emotion”. I think I was trying to liven up the article and add some humor. I think the manipulation Facebook used was unethical and kind of creepy, but as someone who is slowly fading out of the Facebook trend, I can’t take anything related to it too seriously, mainly because I just don’t use it extensively.

    Part II: When I was figuring out my new topic, it sort of came to mind “Wait,  it’s completely possible that I could find and use a 3D printer.” And then I remembered how we’re supposed to make this more than a piece of writing. So, I’m planning on going out and seeing the 3D printing process myself. I’ll take pictures and videos and I would also love to interview instructors and professors that use 3D printing or could use 3D printing and see how they feel about using it in college courses.  I assuming it will mainly reside on my blog and YouTube. I’m imagining it will have a lot of video, gifs( hopefully), interview text and images except many of them will be my own.

  • Thumbnail
    Facebook tinkered with users’ feeds for a massive psychology experiment

    By William Hughes
    Jun 27, 2014 3:30 PM

    Scientists at Facebook have published a paper showing that they manipulated the content […]

  • Facebook tinkered with users’ feeds for a massive psychology experiment

    By William Hughes
    Jun 27, 2014 3:30 PM

    Scientists at Facebook have published a paper showing that they manipulated the content seen by more than 600,000 users in an attempt to determine whether this would affect their emotional state. The paper, “Experimental evidence of massive-scale emotional contagion through social networks,” was published in The Proceedings Of The National Academy Of Sciences. It shows how Facebook data scientists tweaked the algorithm that determines which posts appear on users’ news feeds—specifically, researchers skewed the number of positive or negative terms seen by randomly selected users. Facebook then analyzed the future postings of those users over the course of a week to see if people responded with increased positivity or negativity of their own, thus answering the question of whether emotional states can be transmitted across a social network. Result: They can! Which is great news for Facebook data scientists hoping to prove a point about modern psychology. It’s less great for the people having their emotions secretly manipulated.________In order to sign up for Facebook, users must click a box saying they agree to the Facebook Data Use Policy, giving the company the right to access and use the information posted on the site. The policy lists a variety of potential uses for your data, most of them related to advertising, but there’s also a bit about “internal operations, including troubleshooting, data analysis, testing, research and service improvement.” In the study, the authors point out that they stayed within the data policy’s liberal constraints by using machine analysis to pick out positive and negative posts, meaning no user data containing personal information was actually viewed by human researchers. And there was no need to ask study “participants” for consent, as they’d already given it by agreeing to Facebook’s terms of service in the first place. Link________Facebook data scientist Adam Kramer is listed as the study’s lead author. In an interview the company released a few years ago, Kramer is quoted as saying he joined Facebook because “Facebook data constitutes the largest field study in the history of the world.” It’s a charming reminder that Facebook isn’t just the place you go to see pictures of your friends’ kids or your racist uncle’s latest rant against the government—it’s also an exciting research lab, with all of us as potential test subjects.

    • I loved the gif you added! It made it so muc more interestigand funny. You also chose some good links to add.