Refined Topics

What are students price ranges for bad, average, and good laptops?

https://www.laptopmag.com/articles/tips-for-picking-a-student-laptop

What is the best laptop for Computer Science student? (2017 August)

https://www.extremetech.com/computing/175393-best-laptops-for-engineers-when-work-requires-a-real-workstation

No surprise, each major has it’s own idea about what kind of laptop is necessary.  One thing that did seem standardized though is that you can get a cheap laptop for around $150-$200.  This won’t give you much but if you just want to store some data, browse the web, and write a paper or two it will get the job done.  Medium range laptops are $500-$700, giving you more RAM, bigger hard drive and battery, better screen and a small video card.  If you are an art or engineer student, and are going to be making large scale 3d models reacting to things in real-time, you are going to be spending $1500+.  Going to need to refine the question more.  Maybe more focused on one major.  Another choice would be to compare all the different majors, see what the students think an average price would be.  Could compare that data to what the teachers think.  Could also add another layer of questioning, ask the engineer student how much a business student should spend on and vise versa.

How many times can you see face a face and still not recognize it?

http://content.time.com/time/magazine/article/0,9171,1211572,00.html

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Face_perception

https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/your-hidden-censor-what-your-mind-will-not-let-you-see/

Well the first thing I learned about while searching this topic is that some people suffer from face blindness, or prosopagnosia.  They can’t recognize people by their faces, even their own mothers and themselves. This question has led to a great deal of scientific experiments, including one I remember from a class in my past.  The video of people passing the ball around and you don’t notice the man in the gorilla suit as you count the passes.  It seems people are very good at ignoring things that don’t directly influence them, blocking them out like static.  We fail to see things in front of us constantly.  I don’t think I’ll have to revise this one as much as my other idea.  I could show people two faces, one that they encounter throughout the day, passing in the hall on the way to class.  Or find people in a workplace working in the same building but never on the same project.  Compare that picture with a stranger and see if they can pick out the right one.  Could use two stranger pictures as a fakeout round, see how often people think they recognize someone they’ve never met.

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