Why am I the problem…

What it feels like being the problem…

When Dubois presented this question, I took it personal, from day one my parents have shown me that since I am African American I will have to work harder than all of my friends that are Caucasian. They have taught me about “ white privilege” and that my friends were born into it especially male but may or may not associate with it. In the news all we hear and see from the media is one-sided news stories and it is putting both culture cutthroat with one another. I know I have been born into the “problem” but unlike my fellow members of the community I decided to do something about it. I have worked my tale off to be up in the higher percentile of my class. I want to be known as an individual and not as the problem. I do agree that some African Americans use “ white privilege” as a crutch though in some situations.

Dubois wasn’t trying to point fingers at Caucasian people but only simply saying its not something that can easily be changed its just the way of capitalism, white privilege will always be around. Second sight will always be in minorities consciousness’s it just something we were born with. But I’m also glad that my generation is breaking down the walls and barriers with interracial relationships and not being ashamed of who they like and don’t. We definitively have it better in this century than previous centuries.

5 thoughts on “Why am I the problem…

  • October 17, 2014 at 8:05 pm
    Permalink

    Even as a member of a minority race in America, your post totally opened up a new perspective for me. I have never had conversations with my parents to that depth in regard to “white privilege” or the inequality that I might face. I think in a way, this acts as a testament to how deeply the fissures run between African American and white Americans. We truly live within a complex and unique situation, no other country in the world shares our national experience. Nazi Germany comes close, but Nazi Germany wasn’t built on national ideals of liberty and freedom. In reality, slavery and segregation still sit in our rear-view mirrors, while we try very hard to put that era behind us, it’s easy to forget how recent that history was. There are people alive today who lived through the Jim Crowe era. As a result, African Americans are still living very closely with the “second-sight” DuBois described.

    Reply
    • October 20, 2014 at 2:26 am
      Permalink

      I’m glad my post had a positive affect on you. I try to not seem biased to one race but it’s just my “second sight” coming out. I liked how you went way way back into history and stated that this problem is decades old it’s nothing new and it will never be anything new. It’ll just be swepted under the rug with everything else the government doesn’t want society to know. I like getting feedback from other minorities to make sure I’m covering everyones issues, hopefully one day I will make an impact with my non-profit in the coming years.

      Reply
  • October 19, 2014 at 2:19 am
    Permalink

    Being a sociology major, I often feel a great sense of despair over how horrible everything is and how little I can do to change it. I’m glad that you decided to mention that “We definitely have it better in this country than in previous centuries.” I find myself too often thinking ‘it’s still so horrible’.
    I think that DuBois unintentionally proved his point about it not being something easily changed by his own experience. He couldn’t really get anyone to listen to him, and eventually left the country. I’m glad it didn’t stay that way.

    Reply
  • October 19, 2014 at 11:23 pm
    Permalink

    This is a great post Morgan; I say this because you showed how you did not become the statistic that most Americans try to fit minorities. We are affected by either the standards put upon in our society because we try to live above or it or fall short it affects the mentality of the individual. When you stated that minorities would always have second sight I agree because certain individuals in our society have a permanent view on us and will not change. This affects the minorities because we always size them up when in a room with them or around them in my opinion.

    Reply
  • October 20, 2014 at 1:03 am
    Permalink

    White privilege is certainly an upper hand bestowed on us since our founding fathers were around. I don’t thin it is prevalent in todays society as it used to be and I like how you said that some African American’s use it as a crutch because I feel like it could definitely be an easy excuse to use. Hats off to you for bettering yourself and becoming a better member of your class. I also think that when it comes to being a part of our society, race or class doesn’t matter when it comes to putting in the hard work and effort.

    Reply

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *