Pizza Counting

Dobson, C.

Publication date:
Publisher:

Flesch–Kincaid

5.0

Description

This is a nonfiction text that helps kids explore fractions and decimals. It explains fractions and decimals as they relate to pizza.

Readability

Flesch Kincaid Reading Level 5.0

Use in Class

Since this is a children’s book with a low readability level, I would use this text in my classroom as a student read text. I would then place my students in groups to write and illustrate their own children’s booklet about fractions. This will be used in the Assistance and Reflection phases of PAR.

Unit Focus

Math

Submitted by Rachele Gillespie

How Math Works

Vorderman, C.

Publication date:
Publisher:

Flesch–Kincaid

10.2

Description

<strong>“Fractions and Decimals” (How Math Works, pg. 34)</strong>

This is a nonfiction text that tells the history of fractions and decimals. It explains how fractions and decimals came to be used in the world of mathematics and how they work.

Readability

Flesch Kincaid Reading Level 10.2

Use in Class

Since this is a dense text with a high readability level, I would use this text in my classroom as a teacher read-aloud, followed by a classroom discussion. This will be used in the Assistance phases of PAR.

Unit Focus

Math

Submitted by Rachele Gillespie

Journey Through the World of Numbers

Dyke, J.

Publication date:
Publisher:

Flesch–Kincaid

7.0

Description

This narrative story explains the real number system and the specific classifications of numbers within the real number system. It helps students understand the difference between irrational and rational numbers and the special types of rational numbers including natural numbers, whole numbers, and integers.

Readability

Flesch Kincaid Reading Level 7.0

Use in Class

I have already used this text in my classroom as a student read-aloud. Each student read a piece of the story aloud, followed by a classroom discussion. Afterwards we used the story to create a Venn diagram for the Real Number System. This was used in the Assistance and Reflection phases of PAR.

Unit Focus

Math

Submitted by Rachele Gillespie

“So you think you can’t understand Spanish? – Identifying cognates”

“So you think you can’t understand Spanish? – Identifying cognates”

  • This power point describes what exactly cognates are. In the beginning of the year, this power point should be used to remind students what exactly cognates are. It is also important that Spanish 2 students understand how to use cognates when reading.
    • While cognates are a review from Spanish 1, cognates are something that are stressed in all language classes.
    • This is designed for students at all ACTFL levels. No matter what level you are at, cognates help students with words they don’t know by finding the connection between Spanish and English words.
  • This power point will engage students in learning because they can use this when reading texts to help with understanding. It also draws upon English language vocabulary and knowledge when reading in Spanish.
  • Because this is a lesson and not a text, there is no readability to assess. However, when determining readability and how it relates to the ACTFL standards, the amount of cognates found in a text is considered. So it does help to assess the readability of texts.
  • This will be used in the classroom to review cognates with Spanish 2 students to aid them in reading in the Spanish language.
    • Students and teacher will go over the power point and discuss cognates- what they are and how to use them in reading.
    • This would be used in the Preparation stage of the PAR Lesson Framework.

Citation:

  • Powerpoint: Created by Nadia Hassan

This is Language (Video ID# 5009)

This is Language (Video ID# 5009)

  • This third video has a different woman describing her daily routine.
    • This video relates to the content area because it includes vocabulary and grammar from the daily routine unit.
  • While this has the vocabulary and grammar of the unit, it also begins to bring in other aspects of language learning. It branches out from just reading comprehension to interpretive listening. It can remain a listening assignment, but if students are struggling, they have an option to look at the transcript. This video is targeting students who are at a novice-mid listening level according to the ACTFL standards.
  • According to This is Language, this video is considered to be an “easy” video. I somewhat agree with that classification. I would use this video for students at a novice-mid/novice-high level for interpretive listening according to ACTFL. There is more vocabulary so it draws on previous knowledge as well as forces students to draw conclusions.
    • This video has 102 words; however, the speaker speaks very clearly and slowly.
  • Because students have Chromebooks, this assignment can be given in class or assigned as homework. I prefer to do this assignment in class because students often struggle and get frustrated when it comes to listening to the video.
    • This particular video is directed towards students at a novice-low listening level, which are most students in the beginning of Spanish 2. When told, students will sign into this is language and complete the following tasks:
      • Jigsaw
      • Video Vocab
      • Comprehension
      • Gap Fill

Use in Class:

      • This video would be used in the Reflection stage of the PAR Lesson Framework because it is extended the reading experience. It is also demonstrating learning in a more practical way with regards to language learning, shifting the focus from interpretive reading to interpretive listening.
  • Describe tu rutina diaria la mañana.| This is Language. (n.d.). Retrieved October 17, 2016, from https://www.thisislanguage.com/index.php/school/watch/watchvideo/5009#

This is Language (Video ID# 1558)

This is Language (Video ID# 1558)

  • This video is a step up from the previous one. Again, it is a different woman describing her daily routine. However, this video is longer and more in depth than the previous one.
    • This video relates to the content area because it includes vocabulary and grammar from the daily routine unit.
  • While this has the vocabulary and grammar of the unit, it also begins to bring in other aspects of language learning. It branches out from just reading comprehension to interpretive listening. It can remain a listening assignment, but if students are struggling, they have an option to look at the transcript. This video is targeting students who are at a novice-mid listening level according to the ACTFL standards.
  • According to This is Language, this video is considered to be an “easy” video. I somewhat agree with that classification. I would use this video for students at a novice-mid/novice-high level for interpretive listening according to ACTFL. There is more vocabulary so it draws on previous knowledge as well as forces students to draw conclusions.
    • This video has 137 words, and the speaker speaks quicker than the previous one.
  • Because students have Chromebooks, this assignment can be given in class or assigned as homework. I prefer to do this assignment in class because students often struggle and get frustrated when it comes to listening to the video.
    • This particular video is directed towards students at a novice-mid/novice-high listening level, which are most students in the beginning of Spanish 2. When told, students will sign into this is language and complete the following tasks:
      • Jigsaw
      • Video Vocab
      • Comprehension
      • Gap Fill

Use in Class:

  • This video would be used in the Reflection stage of the PAR Lesson Framework because it is extended the reading experience. It is also demonstrating learning in a more practical way with regards to language learning, shifting the focus from interpretive reading to interpretive listening.

Citation:

  • Describe tu rutina diaria la mañana.| This is Language. (n.d.). Retrieved October 17, 2016, from https://www.thisislanguage.com/index.php/school/watch/watchvideo/1558

This is Language (Video ID# 5154)

This is Language (Video ID# 5154)

  • This video gives a short description of a woman’s daily routine. She describes what she does in the morning, the middle of the day and at night.
    • This video relates to the content area because it includes vocabulary and grammar from the daily routine unit.
  • While this has the vocabulary and grammar of the unit, it also begins to bring in other aspects of language learning. It branches out from just reading comprehension to interpretive listening. It can remain a listening assignment, but if students are struggling, they have an option to look at the transcript.

Readibility:

  • According to This is Language, this video is considered to be an “easy” video. I agree with that classification. There aren’t very many words and the speaker speaks at a pace easy for novice-low listeners to comprehend.
    • This video only has 39 words, and the speaker speaks slowly.
  • Because students have Chromebooks, this assignment can be given in class or assigned as homework. I prefer to do this assignment in class because students often struggle and get frustrated when it comes to listening to the video.
    • This particular video is directed towards students at a novice-low listening level, which are most students in the beginning of Spanish 2. When told, students will sign into this is language and complete the following tasks:
      • Jigsaw
      • Video Vocab
      • Comprehension
      • Gap Fill

Use in Class:

  • This video would be used in the Reflection stage of the PAR Lesson Framework because it is extended the reading experience. It is also demonstrating learning in a more practical way with regards to language learning, shifting the focus from interpretive reading to interpretive listening.

Citation:

  • Describe tu rutina diaria la mañana.| This is Language. (n.d.). Retrieved October 17, 2016, from https://www.thisislanguage.com/school/watch/watchvideo/5154

Explanation on This is Language (TIL):

Explanation on This is Language (TIL):

Reading Comprehension and Interpretive Listening Connections

            This is Language is a resource that the county pays for for foreign language students. Each school is given an allotted number of TIL accounts that they then create for students. I’ve attached information from the TIL website about the ACTFL World-Readiness Standards, Authentic Resources, and Exercises on TIL, but I would like to provide insight on how I use TIL and relate it to reading comprehension.

While reading is important, Spanish is a language. When thinking about real world application, language is conversational, used mostly with speaking and listening. As a Spanish 2 PLC, we have decided for the 2016-2017 school year to focus on interpretive listening the most. In order to build up to strong listening skills, I have students read first. For example, this unit is on daily routines. So students read independently with easier readings, like numbers 5 and 6 in the text set. For more difficult readings, like 1-4, the readings are done and presented in different ways. Some readings are done independently. However, even independent readings usually end up being done together and out loud, whether teacher or student read. This way, students are comfortable with pronunciation. Reading builds a stepping stone for interpretive listening and communicative speaking. While the TIL videos are for the most part assessing the listening skills of students, they have been closely paired to reading assessments given beforehand either in class or as homework.

This Is Language videos can be done digitally on Chromebooks or on paper. For the following sections of my text set, 7-9, I have attached the physical copy of TIL assignments. The paper copies include a transcript, a vocabulary chart and reading comprehension questions. While these assignments alone could be used to asses reading comprehension, it is very important to connect the interpretive listening assessment into the class. When students do the online assignments, they do not have access to the transcripts, because that changes the focus from listening to reading. However, gap fill assignments on TIL are similar to Cloze exercises where students must replace the missing word. However, with TIL videos, students are reading along with what the speaker is saying and filling in the gaps as they hear them.

Welcome to the foreign language classroom!

 

“Comparing Daily Routines”

“Comparing Daily Routines”

  • This was another teacher created text. Again, this was created with novice-low readers in mind but the task it was created for is geared towards students at the novice-mid level. The learning scenario for this text is a student coming to you as a host student/family. It is giving information about the student, his family and his schedule so that the student can understand the cultural similarities and differences before the exchange student arrives.
    • This relates to the content area because we again pulled directly from the CCPS Spanish 2 curriculum when creating this reading and assignment. It incorporates Unit 1 vocabulary and grammar principles.
    • This is targeting all students. While the reading itself is novice-low, students are then asked to compare and contrast their routine to the Roberto’s routine. So while the reading is at a novice-low level, the task is more directed to novice-mid.
  • This reading will help them learn the content because it is rich in Unit 1 vocabulary and grammar.
  • Like the reading on Eduardo’s daily routine, this will engage students because it should help boost their confidence when it comes to reading comprehension.

Readibility:

  • Based on the Fry Graph modification, this text marks at a 3rd grade reading level. I do not agree with the readability of this text based on that formula. I think that because it was teacher created, the length of sentences vary because we were trying to assist in understanding. I think that this affected the readability because the number of sentences was higher than texts written by native speakers.
    • Passage 1: 217 syllables, 14.3 sentences
    • Passage 2: 186 syllables, 12 sentences
      • Average: 201.5 syllables – 67 syllables à 134.5 syllables, 13.15 sentences

Use in Class:

  • In the class, this text is used as a formative reading comprehension/interpretive writing assessment. Students have to take the text and use it to reproduce a Venn Diagram with new information about their routines.
    • This text is targeted to novice-low readers and novice-mid writers.  With this assessment, students will:
      • read independently
      • complete a Venn Diagram comparing and contrasting their day to Roberto’s day
  • This text would be used in the Preparation stage of the PAR lesson framework. It would be a formative reading assessment that would be building background knowledge for a comparative summative that would come later in the quarter. It would also be used in the Reflection stage as well because students are being asked to extend the reading experience and then being evaluated.

Citation:

  • Created by the 2015-2016 Spanish 2 PLC (Erika Morris, Nadia Hassan, and Carrie Williams) at James River High School.

“La Rutina Diara de Eduardo”

“La Rutina Diara de Eduardo”

  • This is a very short, teacher created, reading about the daily routine of Eduardo. It begins with him waking up and completing his morning routine. It discusses the times he goes to school but doesn’t involve in depth information about his school day. It ends with him going home and finishing his evening routine.
    • This relates to the content area because it uses daily routine vocabulary and grammar as specified by the Chesterfield County Spanish 2 curriculum for Unit 1.
    • Because this was created by teachers, it was directed towards novice-low readers according to the ACTFL standards. The reading itself is very short and includes a lot of cognates and previously learned vocabulary, as well as the vocabulary and grammar taught in Unit 1.
  • This will help students learn the material because it is reproducing vocabulary and grammar in a practical way. It is also close to what students will see on a county created Integrated Performance Assessment (IPA) test given at the end of the quarter.
  • Because this is an easier text to read, it might give students a sense of confidence while reading, thus exciting and engaging them.

Readibility:

  • Based on the Fry Graph modification used, this text marks in the upper part of a 7th grade reading level.
    • Passage 1: 215 syllables – 67 syllables à 148 syllables, 9.2 sentences.

Use in Class:

  • This text was used in the classroom as a formative assessment. Because it is rich in vocabulary, it is a great way to integrate vocabulary and grammar into the reading and see if students are studying those aspects of the language. It also assesses how students read complete Spanish sentences and can comprehend what they’ve read.
    • This text was created at a novice-low level based on ACTFL standards. With that in mind, students will:
      • read independently
      • highlight cognates found in the article and circle the vocabulary from the unit
      • Fill in a chart and answer questions to assess comprehension.
  • This would be used in the Reflection stage of the PAR Lesson Framework because students are being evaluated.

Citation:

  • Created by the 2015-2016 Spanish 2 PLC (Erika Morris, Nadia Hassan, and Carrie Williams) at James River High School.