Fantasy vs. Realism Sorting Activity

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Publication date:
Publisher:

Flesch–Kincaid

Description

Readability

Use in Class

When I introduce new genres, skills, and strategies, my students often need very simple hands-on activities to help them grasp the concept. This sort can be done in groups or independently and helps them become familiar with the vocabulary terms fantasy and realism. It also provides a time for me to assess their understanding of the difference between these elements. This can be done after a read aloud of the book, Bear Snores On by Karma Wilson. This is a great book to do because we will have just finished a non-fiction unit on animals. This would be used during the preparation phase of PAR as a concept check of the understanding of fantasy vs. realism.

Unit Focus

Language Arts

Submitted by Becky Norton

Library Lion

Knudsen, Michelle

Publication date:
Publisher:

Flesch–Kincaid

Description

<span style="font-weight: 400;">Library Lion is a great story about a lion that wanders into a public library. No one is sure what to do, but it turns out that the lion loves listening to the books the librarian reads at story time. Until one day when he roars in the library and the librarian makes him leave. The book is read by the actress Mindy Sterling. </span>

Readability

Use in Class

Having books that students can listen to during language arts and literacy centers is a great way for some of my struggling readers to hear books read, listen to what fluent reading sounds like, and be able to read books that are age appropriate for them but may be above their reading level. This would be used during the reflection phase of PAR as I would have them summarize the fantasy elements of the story and generate questions they have after reading the book.

Unit Focus

Language Arts

Submitted by Becky Norton

Charlotte’s Web

Winick, Gary

Publication date:
Publisher:

Flesch–Kincaid

Description

This movie is based on the classic book about Wilbur the pig and his friendship with a spider that tries to save him from slaughter.

Readability

This movie is rated G and the website Common Sense Media (www.CommonSenseMedia.org) recommends it for ages 5 and up with 5 stars for quality, so I think it would be very appropriate to have my students watch it.

Use in Class

Because the book is on a 4th/5th grade reading level, this would make the classic story accessible to all of my students. In addition, it would provide another medium for us to discuss fantasy. This movie would be used during the reflection phase of PAR.

Unit Focus

Language Arts

Submitted by Becky Norton

The Chocolate Touch

Skene Catling, Patrick

Publication date:
Publisher:

Flesch–Kincaid

Description

<span style="font-weight: 400;">This is a cute book about John Midas who loves chocolate. He soon discovers that he has a magical power where everything his lips touch turns to chocolate. </span>

 

 

Readability

Using the Flesch-Kincaid Readability Formula, this book has a reading level of 4.5.

Use in Class

This is a great story for my above-grade level readers to read independently. This book has lots of possibilities for discussion about fantasy vs. realism, text-to-text connections if they read The Midas Touch, etc. This would be used during the reflection phase.

Unit Focus

Language Arts

Submitted by Becky Norton

The Gingerbread Kid Goes to School

Holub, Joan

Publication date:
Publisher:

Flesch–Kincaid

Description

<span style="font-weight: 400;">In this take on the classic, The Gingerbread Man,  the principal bakes a gingerbread kid. The gingerbread kid runs through the school as the students, teachers, and principal try to catch him. </span>

 

 

Readability

Using the Flesch-Kincaid Readability Formula, this book has a reading level of 2.3.

Use in Class

This is a good book for my on-grade level students to read for independent reading. This would be used during the reflection phase.

Unit Focus

Language Arts

Submitted by Becky Norton

Pinkalicious School Rules!

Kann, Victoria

Publication date:
Publisher:

Flesch–Kincaid

Description

<span style="font-weight: 400;">This book features the popular character Pinkalicious and is a story about her imaginary unicorn and what happens when she brings it to school. </span>

Readability

Using the SMOG Formula, the readability level of this book is 1.7.

Use in Class

This is a high-interest book for my students that my lowest readers will enjoy reading independently and is easy to identify the fantasy vs. realistic elements. This would be used during the reflection phase.

Unit Focus

Language Arts

Submitted by Becky Norton

The Princess In Black

Hale, Shannon

Publication date:
Publisher:

Flesch–Kincaid

Description

<span style="font-weight: 400;">This book is a great twist on traditional books about princesses and features a strong female main character. The princess secretly fights monsters that threaten to eat goats. </span>

Readability

Using the Fry Readability Graph, the book is on a 4th/5th grade reading level.

Use in Class

This book is for an above grade level guided reading group. This book will be great for discussions on character analysis as well as the fantasy elements. This book would be used in my guided reading group. Because of the length of the book, it would be used for all three phases of PAR. I would do a story impression before we read as part of the preparation phase. During the assistance phase, I would use DR-TA, different questioning strategies (QAR), and we would discuss different comprehension strategies as we read the book. Finally, during the reflection phase, we would discuss questions about the book, any connections they have (especially text-text), revisit the anticipation guide, and summarize the book as we read and at the end of the book. I would also have them make a story map as they read and compare and contrast this book’s fantasy vs. reality elements with Cinderella.

Unit Focus

Language Arts

Submitted by Becky Norton

Polar Bears Past Bedtime

Pope Osborne, Mary

Publication date:
Publisher:

Flesch–Kincaid

Description

<span style="font-weight: 400;">This is a Magic Treehouse Book, which my students love reading, so I know they will enjoy reading this together during guided reading for my on-grade level students. I love that this book has so many fantasy and realistic elements for us to discuss. In this book, Jack and Annie travel to the Arctic where the meet a seal hunter and have an adventure with a giant polar bear. </span>

 

Readability

Using the Fry Readability Graph, this book is on a 2nd grade level.

Use in Class

This book (and activities done with this book) would be used during guided reading and would be used during all 3 phases of PAR. I would do a story impression or an anticipation guide before we read as part of the preparation phase. During the assistance phase, I would use DR-TA, different questioning strategies, and we would discuss different comprehension strategies as we read the book. Finally, during the reflection phase, we would discuss questions about the book, any connections they have (especially text-text), revisit the anticipation guide, and summarize the book as we read and at the end of the book.

Unit Focus

Language Arts

Submitted by Becky Norton

Jack and the Beanstalk

Dufresne, Michele

Publication date:
Publisher:

Flesch–Kincaid

Description

<span style="font-weight: 400;">This is a very simply written version of the folktale using high-frequency sight words. </span>

 

 

Readability

Using the SMOG Formula, the readability level of this book is 1.7.

Use in Class

I would use this book in my lowest guided reading group (reading below grade level) as we discuss the fantasy elements in the story. This would be used in the assistance phase of PAR as we would read the book together, discuss comprehension strategies used during reading, and discuss different questions about the book.

Unit Focus

Language Arts

Submitted by Becky Norton

Raising Dragons

Nolen, Jerdine

Publication date:
Publisher:

Flesch–Kincaid

Description

<span style="font-weight: 400;">This is a story about a girl that finds an egg that hatches into a dinosaur. She raises the dinosaur and it becomes her best friend. She thinks she has to say goodbye to the dinosaur, but it turns out she was meant to raise dragons. </span>

Readability

Using the Fry Readability Graph, this books is right on the line between 4th and 5th grade.

Use in Class

This fantasy book will be used as an interactive read-aloud to discuss the parts that are realistic vs. fantasy. This is an easy book for students to connect to as we also discuss friendships. This book would be used during the assistance phase. I would stop at various points to ask questions and discuss the book as well as make a chart with the students after reading the book comparing the aspects of the story that are realistic vs. fantasy.

Unit Focus

Language Arts

Submitted by Becky Norton