Custom Dashboard Styles

We had a network activated plugin throwing a notification across all our site dashboards. We did not wish for this to happen any longer. So this was added to a network activated plugin. The first part enqueues a css script for the dashboard. The CSS makes the message hidden. The css targets a particular element that’s something like what you see below. I wondered if css could target things based on data attribute values and it can. […]

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Digital Histology & the Long Haul

Normally we finish our projects in anywhere from a few hours to a few weeks. Digital Histology has been the exception to that rule. I can see a reference to the site going back to Nov. of 2016! That doesn’t mean we’ve worked on this site continuously for years. The gaps have been frequent and long. OER grants have been written and won. Presentations have been made. Work has ebbed and flowed as the massive amount of content has been entered. There are more than 1500 pages1 and over 5GBs of images. It’s a large site. A ton of work has gone into its construction, new goals have developed, and just about all of it is a little strange. 2 I figured I’d better document some of this before I forgot all of it. The History I don’t recall all the details but essentially long ago in a Macromedia Authorware galaxy far, far away a digital histology program was constructed. Time passed. Acorns grew into trees. WINE was now required to launch the digital histology program. The screen was a tiny 752×613. It only ran on desktops. Updating it was nearly impossible. Things were not good. After much wandering we found one another and endeavored to put this work online for the betterment of humankind. Having a previous project did […] […]

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Digital Histology & the Long Haul

Normally we finish our projects in anywhere from a few hours to a few weeks. Digital Histology has been the exception to that rule. I can see a reference to the site going back to Nov. of 2016! That doesn’t mean we’ve worked on this site continuously for years. The gaps have been frequent and long. OER grants have been written and won. Presentations have been made. Work has ebbed and flowed as the massive amount of content has been entered. There are more than 1500 pages1 and over 5GBs of images. It’s a large site. A ton of work has gone into its construction, new goals have developed, and just about all of it is a little strange. 2 I figured I’d better document some of this before I forgot all of it. The History I don’t recall all the details but essentially long ago in a Macromedia Authorware galaxy far, far away a digital histology program was constructed. Time passed. Acorns grew into trees. WINE was now required to launch the digital histology program. The screen was a tiny 752×613. It only ran on desktops. Updating it was nearly impossible. Things were not good. After much wandering we found one another and endeavored to put this work online for the betterment of humankind. Having a previous project did […] […]

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Photography with Faculty

I had the opportunity to work with Ryan Smith again recently. He’s been putting in serious work on on his website (Richmond Cemeteries) and is now turning a portion of that work into a book (Death and Rebirth in a Southern City: Richmond’s Historic Cemeteries). Ryan came by to talk a bit about pictures for the book which led to a field trip (Hebrew Cemetery and Shockoe Street Cemetery) and I think some useful reflections on how the balance between technology, technical proficiency, and art works together to make something interesting. It’s a bit of rambling tour of a series of issues that are specific to this task (getting high quality images of grave markers for a book) but are also illustrative of larger things. Basic Considerations Light Light matters quite a bit. When we looked through Ryan’s initial photos many of them were taken in very bright light. That’s good in some scenarios but leads to really hard shadows. In any photo, thinking hard about where the light is and how it falls will be key in creating the image you want. Usually you want the light behind you. Usually you want it to be soft. I showed up a little before sunrise but I didn’t have a shot list and I’d never visited the site before. That led […] […]

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Photography with Faculty

I had the opportunity to work with Ryan Smith again recently. He’s been putting in serious work on on his website (Richmond Cemeteries) and is now turning a portion of that work into a book (Death and Rebirth in a Southern City: Richmond’s Historic Cemeteries). Ryan came by to talk a bit about pictures for the book which led to a field trip (Hebrew Cemetery and Shockoe Street Cemetery) and I think some useful reflections on how the balance between technology, technical proficiency, and art works together to make something interesting. It’s a bit of rambling tour of a series of issues that are specific to this task (getting high quality images of grave markers for a book) but are also illustrative of larger things. Basic Considerations Light Light matters quite a bit. When we looked through Ryan’s initial photos many of them were taken in very bright light. That’s good in some scenarios but leads to really hard shadows. In any photo, thinking hard about where the light is and how it falls will be key in creating the image you want. Usually you want the light behind you. Usually you want it to be soft. I showed up a little before sunrise but I didn’t have a shot list and I’d never visited the site before. That led […] […]

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