Gravity Forms Notification to Google Spreadsheet

The idea that data can flow to different places for different purposes is one of the key concepts I want people to believe in. Different technologies and different interfaces have different affordances depending on what you’re trying to do. In this case, we’ve built some online training for students. As part of that training they need to sign off indicating they read various rules and safety advice. We’re using Gravity Forms to collect that information. We’re going to set a special notification email that’s easier to parse in addition to the regular email that gets sent out (that one is oriented towards student confirmation and alerting the individual faculty). Gravity Forms Notification We’re just going to put the student email and faculty email in the subject line with a space between them. I did some fancier stuff early but went back to this when I realized what we were doing just wasn’t complex enough to justify extra drama. I set the from name to Health Hub Logger so it’d be easier to write the filter in GMail. Notifications in Gravity Forms are pretty straight forward but you can find out more on their site. GMail Filter I then setup a filter in GMail so that I could be confident that the Google Script could find these emails and that I […] […]

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Making an Index Using Javascript

Working with a faculty member we had a rather long page that was originally written in Google Docs. It had many sections that were (mostly) designated by H tags of various denominations. The goal was to and put it on a website quickly build an index of anchor links. I did not wish to do the index portion by hand. With javascript things like this are relatively pleasant. You can see the whole thing in this codepen but I’ll break it down a bit below. First we can get all the H tags with querySelectorAll. I can console.log(headers) and I’ll see a NodeList of all the headers it found. I tend to work console.log all my variables as I go just to make sure it’s really happening the way I think it is. My next move is to add an id to each of these headers so that we can navigate to them via anchor links. with this forEach loop each header will get an id of header-whatever number we’re on in the loop. Now that I have headers that I can link to as anchor links, I need to build the index and put it somewhere. In this case it was easy for me to add a div to the source manually so I did. That will be where […] […]

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Photography with Faculty

I had the opportunity to work with Ryan Smith again recently. He’s been putting in serious work on on his website (Richmond Cemeteries) and is now turning a portion of that work into a book (Death and Rebirth in a Southern City: Richmond’s Historic Cemeteries). Ryan came by to talk a bit about pictures for the book which led to a field trip (Hebrew Cemetery and Shockoe Street Cemetery) and I think some useful reflections on how the balance between technology, technical proficiency, and art works together to make something interesting. It’s a bit of rambling tour of a series of issues that are specific to this task (getting high quality images of grave markers for a book) but are also illustrative of larger things. Basic Considerations Light Light matters quite a bit. When we looked through Ryan’s initial photos many of them were taken in very bright light. That’s good in some scenarios but leads to really hard shadows. In any photo, thinking hard about where the light is and how it falls will be key in creating the image you want. Usually you want the light behind you. Usually you want it to be soft. I showed up a little before sunrise but I didn’t have a shot list and I’d never visited the site before. That led […] […]

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Photography with Faculty

I had the opportunity to work with Ryan Smith again recently. He’s been putting in serious work on on his website (Richmond Cemeteries) and is now turning a portion of that work into a book (Death and Rebirth in a Southern City: Richmond’s Historic Cemeteries). Ryan came by to talk a bit about pictures for the book which led to a field trip (Hebrew Cemetery and Shockoe Street Cemetery) and I think some useful reflections on how the balance between technology, technical proficiency, and art works together to make something interesting. It’s a bit of rambling tour of a series of issues that are specific to this task (getting high quality images of grave markers for a book) but are also illustrative of larger things. Basic Considerations Light Light matters quite a bit. When we looked through Ryan’s initial photos many of them were taken in very bright light. That’s good in some scenarios but leads to really hard shadows. In any photo, thinking hard about where the light is and how it falls will be key in creating the image you want. Usually you want the light behind you. Usually you want it to be soft. I showed up a little before sunrise but I didn’t have a shot list and I’d never visited the site before. That led […] […]

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