Monthly Archives: September 2016

Diigo

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Submitted by Blair Burnette

I created a Diigo account in order to save online resources. I lead a group of 494 students as part of my assistantship. These are all students who are interested in doing PSYC 494 in order to gain research experience. All of my current students are interested in going to graduate school in psychology. Our first topic of the semester is on graduate programs in psychology. Many of them are interested in graduate school but are not interested in doing research. However, they are unclear of what their options are and what is the best fit for their interests. Thus, they were really eager to learn more about the process, the different types of programs, licensure, and funding sources.

Although our lab has some resources saved, many of the resources overlap or are outdated. As well, our students do not have direct access to these resources as they are saved on our network drive.

So, I wanted to create a collection of links and resources I think would be beneficial for the students where they could access them at any time. I created a Group within Diigo and made it invitation only so that I can invite my 494 students. Then, I created an Outliner called "Graduate Programs in Psychology." I have been saving various articles and resources from around the web using the Chrome extension for Diigo. I love the extension as it means I can just click a little button on my toolbar and easily save the item. Even better, the extension allows me to specify where in my Diigo account and group the link goes and allows me to add a description and tag it. Thus, my students can go into the Diigo group and browse the resources by topic.

I am looking forward to collecting more and more resources this way and having a space for my students to go. As well, creating the group means we can have discussions within Diigo which further strengthens our community. Hopefully the students can also learn and gain support from each other!

Mandatory use of technology in teaching: Who cares and so what? British journal of educational technology

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Submitted by Melissa Washington-Nortey

Article Reference

Yeung, A. S., Taylor, P. G., Hui, C., Lam‐Chiang, A. C., & Low, E. L. (2012). Mandatory use of technology in teaching: Who cares and so what? <em>British journal of educational technology</em>, <em>43</em>(6), 859-870

Article DOI

Summary of Article

<strong>Main research question and investigative strategy</strong>

Does mandating the use of digital technology in the classroom enhance its application?

The study explored issues related to compliance, competence, value and frequency in the utilization of digital technology.

<strong>Useful Operational definitions</strong>

Compliance- teacher’s <strong>perceptions</strong> of the need to conform

Competence- expertise/skill in a particular area

Value-perceived importance

Frequency- rate of occurrence

<strong>Sample and Procedure</strong>

323 preservice teachers from the National Institute of Education in Singapore.

163-Postgraduate Diploma in Education (PGDE)

160- 3<sup>rd</sup> year students in a 4-year Bachelor’s degree in Education program (BEd)

The study made use of an online survey method which had a response rate of 50.8%.

<strong>Results and Discussion</strong>

Compliance was inversely related to competence (r=-0.16), value (r==0.06) and frequency (r=-0.14).

Competence was positively related to value (r=0.76) and frequency (r=0.34).

Efforts aimed at improving teacher competence through preservice training were discussed.

Females were significantly more compliant than males (β=-0.13).

PGDE students were more significantly more compliant than BEd students (β=-0.17)

PGDE students were older on average and therefore less likely to be competent and more likely to feel the burden of compliance measures.

Discussion Questions

  1. Obligation

    1. Should technology use be required in all classroom settings?

  2. Value
    2. Is technology always an asset in the classroom?
    3. Given the positive associations between value, competence and frequency found in the study, how can faculty set in their ways be exposed to value of using technology in their classrooms?
    4. How can technology be used as a tool to enhance student development in the classroom?
  3. Competence

    5. Should technology consultants/assistants be available in each classroom and can they be students?

The Online STEM Classroom—Who Succeeds? An Exploration of the Impact of Ethnicity, Gender, and Non-traditional Student Characteristics in the Community College Context

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Submitted by Elizaveta Bourchtein

Article Reference

Wladis, C., Conway, K. M., & Hachey, A. C. (2015). The online STEM classroom – who succeeds? An exploration of the impact of ethnicity, gender, and non-traditional student characteristics in the community college context. <em>Community College Review, 2</em>, 142-164.

Article DOI

10.1177/0091552115571729

Summary of Article

<strong><u>Purpose</u></strong>
<ul>
<li>To examine demographic predictors of success in online STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics) courses compared to tradition “face-to-face” courses</li>
</ul>
<strong><u>Background</u></strong>
<ul>
<li>Increasing amounts of STEM courses offered at community college level, where many courses are offered online</li>
<li>Online courses have significantly higher attrition rates than face-to-face courses</li>
<li>No research thus far has been conducted on demographic factors that predict success/difficulty in STEM online (vs. face-to-face) courses, particularly in community college setting
<ul>
<li>Past studies on online courses (not specifically STEM) show mixed findings on the effects of gender and race/ethnicity</li>
</ul>
</li>
</ul>
<strong><u>Methods</u></strong>
<ul>
<li><em>N</em> = 3,600 community college students in Northeastern US</li>
<li>Matched students in online STEM courses to those in face-to-face STEM courses (courses were taught by same professor at same time)</li>
<li>Examined effects of race/ethnicity (combined), gender, and age (under 24 vs. 24 and older)</li>
</ul>
<strong><u>Results</u></strong>
<ul>
<li>Younger students less likely to complete online courses than older students and less likely to complete online courses than face-to-face; similar rates of success in face-to-face courses</li>
<li>Female students had higher rates of success in face-to-face courses than men; similar rates of success in online courses</li>
<li>Black and Latino/a students had no significant differences between online and face-to-face courses; Latino/a students had significantly poorer performance in STEM courses in general than did White/Asian students
<ul>
<li>Did not examine race/ethnicity * gender</li>
</ul>
</li>
<li>Enrollment status (full vs. part time), financial aid, TANF benefits, GPA, prior online experience did not predict performance in online vs. face-to-face courses</li>
</ul>

Discussion Questions

  1. Were these results what you expected? What might be some explanations for these findings? Do you think these findings are exclusive to STEM courses or would similar results be found for courses related to your own content area?
  2. Do you think these findings would generalize to any online content that may be used in hybrid classes? How, if at all, do these results affect how you may incorporate online tools into your classes?
  3. The article glossed over the finding that Black and particularly Hispanic students "had worse success rates in face-to-face STEM classes." How might introducing this fact in the way the article did be problematic? What are some ways you would improve this article's discussion of race/ethnicity differences in STEM performance? Are there ways that online courses/material can be used to reduce the STEM achievement gap?

Scale of teacher empathy for African American males (S-TEAAM): Measuring teacher conceptions and the application of empathy in multicultural classroom settings

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Submitted by Krystal Thomas

Article Reference

Warren, C.A. (2015). Scale of teacher empathy for African American males (S-TEAAM): Measuring teacher conceptions and the application of empathy in multicultural classroom settings. <em>The Journal of Negro Education</em>, 84(2), 154-174.

Article DOI

Summary of Article

<strong>Purpose: </strong>

To examine practicing teacher’s’ beliefs and practices about empathy for African American males as a professional disposition.

 

<strong>Method: </strong>
<ul>
<li>73 practicing classroom teachers completed the S-TEAAM survey
<ul>
<li>8% White respondents</li>
<li>4% Black respondents</li>
<li>8% “other” respondents</li>
</ul>
</li>
<li>Participants responded to items that “discerned practicing teachers’ beliefs about empathy’s importance and relevance to teaching of Black males”
<ul>
<li><em><u>teacher conceptions of empathy </u></em><u>(TCE)</u> was a 4-item measure that assessed teachers’ beliefs about empathy as a professional disposition</li>
<li><em><u>teacher application of empathy </u></em><u>(TAE)</u> was a 5-item measure that assessed teachers’ actual usage of empathy in multiple teaching practices</li>
</ul>
</li>
<li>Principal component analysis was conducted to test the validity of the S-TEAAM</li>
</ul>
 

<strong>Results: </strong>
<ul>
<li>Two factors were deemed the most meaningful and most psychometrically sound
<ul>
<li>Teacher conceptions of empathy had a Cronbach’s alpha of .80</li>
<li>Similarly, teacher application of empathy had a Cronbach’s alpha of .80 as well</li>
</ul>
</li>
<li>A statistically significant negative relationship was found between TCE and TAE. This relationship suggested that teachers generally believe empathy to be important but not necessarily apply empathy consistently in their own practice</li>
<li>Teachers endorsed that they were less likely to employ empathy on tasks that did not require actual face-to-face interactions with their students (e.g. grading homework)</li>
</ul>

Discussion Questions

  1. How do you personally define empathy?
  2. What are some courses that you would like to teach, how can you incorporate empathy in your own practices and course lectures?
  3. 1What else can we do to build rapport with students of color when lecturing?

Incorporating Active Learning With PowerPoint-Based Lectures Using Content-Based Questions

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Submitted by Zoe Smith

Article Reference

Gier, V. S., & Kreiner, D. S. (2009). Incorporating active learning with PowerPoint-
based lectures using content-based questions. <em>Teaching of Psychology, 36</em>, 134-139.

Article DOI

10.1080/00986280902739792

Summary of Article

<ul>
<li><u>Purpose</u>: Examined whether including content based questions (CBQs) in PowerPoint lectures could enhance learning
<ul>
<li>Previous research suggested asking questions (versus passively absorbing lecture) improves learning</li>
</ul>
</li>
<li><u>CBQ Technique</u>: During lecture students given time to write out answers to questions based on the material covered in PowerPoint, then immediately discuss the answer</li>
<li><u>First Study</u>: Two cognitive psychology classes (one with 32 students and the other with 41) were taught, one which included CBQs (i.e., written reflections to questions followed by a discussion) during the PowerPoint lecture, the other without using CBQ, and instead used small group discussions at end of class
<ul>
<li>Analyses: 2×2 mixed ANOVA (CBQ vs. Traditional; pre-class quiz score vs. post-class quiz score)</li>
<li>Results: Both groups scored higher on post-class quizzes, but CBQ class scored significantly higher than students in traditional class on post-class quizzes as well as exams scores</li>
</ul>
</li>
<li><u>Second Study</u>: Tested the effectiveness of the CBQ technique in a within-subjects design (36 participating history of psychology students) by including CBQs for two quarters, and only traditional PowerPoint slides for two quarters.
<ul>
<li>Analyses: 2×2 repeated measures ANOVA (pre-class and post-class quiz scores, CBQ and Traditional). Paired samples t-test (Compared average of exam scores during traditional and CBQ conditions)</li>
<li>Results: Higher post-class quiz and exam scores were obtained in the CBQ condition than in traditional.</li>
</ul>
</li>
<li><u>Conclusion</u>: CBQ technique allows students to reflect on the material and increase understanding shown through higher quiz and exam scores, therefore, professors using PowerPoint should include CBQs in their lectures</li>
</ul>

Discussion Questions

  1. 1. The article discussed potential problems with using PowerPoint, what are the pros and cons to this lecture style and how can professors/TAs make it more engaging?
  2. 2. How do you create good CBQs?
  3. 3. Would this technique work in large lecture classes or labs? How might you change the technique to fit your class?