Monthly Archives: September 2017

Youtube channel

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Submitted by Ruben M

I chose to create a Youtube channel for a course that I have always wanted to teach to undergraduates, “The science of disseminating knowledge and implementing effective therapy.” This process was pretty simple and yielded a lot of potential content. I like that Youtube videos are short and engaging. They often work well as 1) introductions to a new concept, 2) conversation starters, and 3) something for a student to refer back to. I was pleasantly surprised that I found so much content on this area, though a good deal of it was introductory. I also think that making a Youtube video would be a really cool assignment, particularly in areas where there is not a lot of nuance to the content available. One potential problem is that you’re sort of at the mercy of the person who creates the content. I saw some videos that didn’t explain some content exactly correctly, but the other parts of the video are great, which was a little frustrating. Otherwise, it was overall a good experience and helped me find some great stuff for teaching and mentorship purposes!

Link: <a href="https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLwWakKGXoZuSjo5oFd-EmrIPS4LGMi27b">https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLwWakKGXoZuSjo5oFd-EmrIPS4LGMi27b</a>

Jing: A Tool for Screencasts

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Submitted by Scott R

For my technology assignment, I decided to test an application called Jing which enables users to record screencasts. I used a PowerPoint associated with a recent class presentation that I gave to test the screencast software. I found that the application was relatively user friendly and intuitive to use. However, I found that if users decide to capture the entire computer screen in the screencast, then they cannot move from one powerpoint slide to the next. However, after a second attempt, when I left a small portion of the screen out of the screencast, then I could move from one slide to the next without any problems.

Instructors who decide to use Jing should be aware of its limitations. For example, one significant downside of the program is that it only allows you to record screencasts that are no longer than 5 minutes long. Thus, users would be unable to record full lectures using this program. In addition, users should be aware that their computer must have the latest version of the adobe flash player or else they will not be able to preview (or even view) their recorded screencast. Thus, users who plan on recording or viewing screencasts on something other than their personal computer may encounter difficulties. Finally, unlike other more expensive screencast recording options, Jing does not let you make post-recording edits. The inability to make edits leaves little room for error. However, given the short time limit associated with the screencasts, this is perhaps only a small drawback.

Although Jing has a number of limitations, the program also has a number of potential applications. For example, the brief format of the screencasts could be used to reinforce or clarify particularly challenging classroom concepts. Secondly, the program could be used provide brief SPSS demonstrations to students in PSCY214. Finally, the program could be used to allow students to make brief presentations in an online class. Given these potential implications, I think that Jing is a good tool for instructors to be knowledgeable about.

My short screencast is available here:

<a href="https://www.screencast.com/t/7m9qNlkE">https://www.screencast.com/t/7m9qNlkE</a>

If you record it, some won’t come: Using lecture capture in introductory psychology

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Submitted by Sultan Hubbard

Article Reference

Drouin, M. A. (2014). If you record it, some won’t come: Using lecture capture in introductory psychology. <em>Teaching of Psychology, 41(1)</em>, 11-19.

Article DOI

http://dx.doi.org.proxy.library.vcu.edu/10.1177/0098628313514172

Summary of Article

Drouin (2014) sought to assess the impact of supplemental video lectures on the academic achievement of students in a face-to-face introductory psychology course. Specifically, the author conducted a quasi-experimental design in which one section received the supplemental videos online and the other did not receive the supplemental videos. Drouin (2014) conducted mediation analysis to assess course sections relation to achievement through the mediator variable: class attendance. The author found that although many students thought supplemental videos were useful, many did not use the resource regularly, or used the videos to compensate for a class absence. Consequently, the author found that among the treatment group (those who received the supplemental lecture videos) had significantly lower class attendance and significantly lower final grade scores at the end of the semester than controls. Drouin further assessed these findings and discovered that the differences in the treatment and control groups attendance and performance were due to a subset of the students in the treatment condition and that differences between the control and treatment conditions vanished when controlling for these students.

Discussion Questions

  1. This article presently demonstrated that there was an effect of class section (access to supplemental videos or no access) on academic achievement (final grades) via class attendance. How do you interpret these findings? How does this impact your view on usage of online materials during your course? Does your opinions change depending on the type of course being taught?
  2. The author describes a small set of students in the treatment group who missed exams, had low attendance rates that many of their peers, and did not seem to be aided by the supplemental videos. How would you aid or check-in with these students? How would you balance you desire for them to succeed with their need for autonomy as young adults?
  3. Do you have any theories as to why many students did not use the supplemental videos? How would you seek to increase the viewing rates of this material if you were an instructor?

Interteaching and lecture: A comparison of long-term recognition memory. 

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Submitted by Scott Ravyts

Article Reference

Saville, B. K., Bureau, A., Eckenrode, C., Fullerton, A., Herbert, R., Maley, M., … & Zombakis, J. (2014). Interteaching and lecture: A comparison of long-term recognition memory. <em>Teaching of Psychology</em>, <em>41</em>(4), 325-329.

Article DOI

doi: 10.1177/0098628314549704

Summary of Article

Interteaching is a pedagogical style which blends peer-learning activities with student engagement and increased student accountability. Although interteaching has shown promise in improving students’ scores in the short-term, its longer term effects are still unknown. Saville et al. (2014) examined the effect of interteaching on psychology students’ memory of class material both in the short-term (1 week) and the long-term (1 month). The authors found that students in the interteaching condition scored significantly higher on quizzes at both time periods than students in the traditional lecture condition. Although further research is needed to examine exactly how interteaching leads to the improved retention of class material, the study’s findings suggest that interteaching might be an effective alternative to the traditional lecture format.

Discussion Questions

  1. 1. What do you think are some advantages of interteaching? Disadvantages?
  2. 2. In what contexts do you think interteaching might work? In what contexts might alternative methods be more useful?
  3. 3. Interteaching is an emerging pedagogical format; what other pedagogical formats have you heard of, or experienced, that you think merit greater consideration in academic settings? How do they compare to interteaching?