Monthly Archives: November 2018

Youtube

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Submitted by Mattie Hedgebeth

In undergrad, I found YouTube to be a very useful tool in studying and learning class material. For my technology assignment, I compiled useful videos from the YouTube channel "CrashCourse" which give a short and fun explanation of educational subjects, in this case, subjects pertaining to social psychology. I have also added a few videos that are in a similar format and would be useful to students that may just need something explained in a different way or just want to quickly review material for a test or quiz. https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCCLUk397vKEZflM11NApNrA?view_as=subscriber

Online Academic Integrity

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Submitted by Samantha Mladen

Article Reference

Mastin, D., Peszka, J., & Lilly, D. (2009). Online academic integrity. Teaching of Psychology, 36(3), 174-178.

Article DOI

10.1080/00986280902739768

Summary of Article

Aim: Investigate whether academic pledges reduce the level of cheating in online assignments, and assess the overall rate of cheating in online assignments

Method: 439 introductory psychology students were recruited over three semesters. Participants were told that they would be completing an online motor task and that their earned extra credit would increase based on their score on the motor task. Participants were told that the computer program would not track their correct responses, and thus they were asked to self-report their correct response total.
Students were randomized to three experimental conditions: no pledge, check mark pledge, and written honor pledge

Results: 361 participants (82.2%) accurately reported their performance, 16 (3.6%) underreported their performance, and 62 (14.1%) overreported their performance.
Mean magnitude of cheating in the entire sample was 0.39/10 points (SD = 1.52), but the mean in the cheating sample was 3.08/10 points over-reporting (SD = 2.75).
Honor pledge condition had no effect on the rate of cheating in the overall sample, or in the cheating subset . Participants were 2.06 times more likely to cheat at the end of the semester than at the beginning, but time of semester did not affect the magnitude of cheating. When the required magnitude of overreporting to be considered cheating was increased (2 points out of 10 instead of 1 point out of 10) the percentage of students cheating dropped to 8.0%. This change was made to account for the presence of 13 students underreporting by 1 point – the authors allowed a larger margin of error in reporting before labelling over-reporting as cheating.

Discussion: Research is still needed to determine the actual rates of cheating on online assignments, and effective strategies to reduce rates of cheating. These efforts are becoming more important as more institutions and professors institute online courses and assessment methods. Though the external validity is not perfect, since most online exams are not self-report, the lack of significance of the honor pledge condition is troubling.

Discussion Questions

  1. Would you include a version of an honor pledge in your courses? Has your opinion changed as a result of reading this study?
  2. Forsyth cites a study that claims that more students say that they would be more likely to cheat online than the rates at which they actually cheat. What does this tell us about the way in which students approach online learning? How can we use this information to try to prevent cheating?
  3. Online learning brings with it tremendous opportunities to increase collaboration and team-based learning among students. How would you balance this opportunity with the reality that it may make cheating easier for students?

TED Ed – Lessons and Series

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Submitted by Margaret Kneuer

Article Reference

https://ed.ted.com/

Article DOI

Summary of Article

For the technology activity, I decided to explore the TED-Ed Lessons and Series for video content related to psychology topics, specifically in social or relationship psychology courses. I found the TED-Ed website to have more organized features for video lesson planning than YouTube because of the added features of creating or using lessons. After creating an account, I had the ability to design lessons that supplement the curriculum in different psychology courses or use the premade lessons provided. I selected 11 videos between 5-20 minutes in length, and the TED-Ed website allows me to save and edit lessons for students. I also had the chance to crop the video for students, if needed, and provide an overview with additional multiple choice or short answer questions to check for understanding. The website has an option for instructors to require, if needed, student log in to make sure students watch and answer the questions. There is also a section for students to open up to discussion prompts, which could help facilitate any classroom discussion about the different topics. I have the option to add or subtract any videos throughout to better enhance student learning, or adjust the videos depending on the course in the future. This technological tool is designed to aid instructors in completing lesson plans swiftly and in an organized fashion. As a final collaborative project for students, I could also assign a partner video project, modeled after the videos used in the course, to create their own version of a TED Talk, educational video, or a response to a video and upload it. Overall, I found the TED-Ed lesson planning feature to be beneficial in organizing videos and related questions for students to use, which would supplement their readings assigned for a specific course in the future.

Discussion Questions

  1. 1. Dan Gilbert (2004) “The Surprising Science of Happiness”
    https://www.ted.com/talks/dan_gilbert_asks_why_are_we_happy
    Decade Follow Up Article on 2004 TED Talk
    https://blog.ted.com/ten-years-later-dan-gilbert-on-life-after-the-surprising-science-of-happiness/
    2. Robb Willer (2017) “How to Have Better Political Conversations”
    https://www.ted.com/talks/robb_willer_how_to_have_better_political_conversations
    3. Amy Cuddy (2012) “Your Body Language May Shape Who You Are”
    https://www.ted.com/talks/amy_cuddy_your_body_language_shapes_who_you_are
    Decade Follow Up Article on 2012 TED Talk
    https://ideas.ted.com/inside-the-debate-about-power-posing-a-q-a-with-amy-cuddy/
    4. Philip Zimbardo (2008) “The Psychology of Evil”
    https://www.ted.com/talks/philip_zimbardo_on_the_psychology_of_evil
    5. Freeman Hrabowski (2013) “Four Pillars of College Success in Science”
    https://www.ted.com/talks/freeman_hrabowski_4_pillars_of_college_success_in_science
    6. Martin Seligman (2008) “The New Era of Positive Psychology”
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9FBxfd7DL3E
    7. Robert Sternberg (2014) “Successful Intelligence”
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ow05B4bjGWQ
    8. Walter Mischel (2015) “The Marshmallow Test”
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XcmrCLL7Rtw
    9. Elizabeth Loftus (2013) “How Reliable is Your Memory?”
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PB2OegI6wvI
    10. Barbara Fredrickson (2011) “Positive Emotions Open our Mind”
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z7dFDHzV36g
    11. Robert Cialdini (2012) “Science of Persuasion”
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cFdCzN7RYbw
  2. (Options to also change the videos selected)
  3. (refer to TED Ed website to create your own lesson plan)