Schedule

Course Schedule In Detail 

A note about deadlines: EACH DATE INDICATES THE DATE WORK IS DUE. WORK DUE ON A SPECIFIC DATE MUST BE SUBMITTED BY 11:59 p.m. Eastern Time.

A note about synchronous (same-place, same-time) events vs. asynchronous events: although most of the course is asynchronous–participation will happen at various times, loosely organized by days–there will be some special synchronous events, mostly live Google Hangouts streamed to the web. They are noted below. If you cannot make a synchronous event, don’t worry: there will be an archived version you can watch later. There will be possibilities for real-time interaction during the synchronous event–for example, asking questions of a guest speaker–that won’t be available when you view the archived version, but either way there will be plenty of opportunities to make use of the material and to interact around it.

PHASE TWO (10/20 – 12/04)

 

Monday, October 19
Library Instruction Day! We will meet in Cabell Room 321.  Do not be late or absent! Be courteous!

Tuesday 10/20:

If you have not filled out the Research Question form, do so now.

They Say / I Say: Write a blog post in which you find the passage containing the concept (perhaps from a previous nugget post) that you most closely identify with your own way of thinking, and explain why. What about the language of the passage do you admire?” Why do you identify with this passage and thinker the most? What about your own writing content and/or style do you most wish to see published in your final inquiry project?

Wednesday and Thursday 10/21-22:

Mapping my Dreamers: Select three of the new media readings from Phase I and synthesize at least five conceptual bases for comparing them to one another. Select useful concepts or insights, summarize them briefly, and then relate them to each other in multiple different ways. The goal here is not a huge amount of writing, but intelligible notes that will be useful later on for yourself and your peers. Compare, contrast, recognize patterns within, and impute the motives behind the dreamers’ work, and you’ll be on the right track. This is not an easy thing to do, and you may find it easier to create a visual version of this process and then either scan it to your blog or use a digital app and then link to it (or embed). (Though, note that it doesn’t have to be visual.)  Tag the post synthesis so that the cMOOC motherblog can filter these posts usefully.

Friday 10/23:

Revise your Mapping my Dreamers post after visiting the sites of at least three students, one from your section and two from outside your section (preferably those who wrote on the same three essays, but not required). Link to their synthesis of the dreamers and compare your efforts to theirs. Also, reflect on why you chose the three essays that you chose.

Sunday 10/25:

By the end of the day, post Finalizing my Dream: write a blog post which you lock yourself in to a specific area of inquiry (i.e. the thing you want to study and how you’re going to approach it.  Note: This may seem repetitive, but it is meant to help you refine your focus and let it be known). Reflect on the past week, the three new media dreamers you selected, and what your peers have taught you about them. What subject in or of or about the internet will you research for the final inquiry project, and how will your three dreamers help you do that?

Monday 10/26

Nuggeting Sources: Find either a scholarly or substantive source you think would be helpful to you in your inquiry project and write a nugget post for it.  (Remember that a nugget is a passage from the reading that grabs you in some way and make that passage as meaningful as possible. It could be a passage that puzzles you, or intrigues you, or resonates strongly with you. It could be a passage you agree with, or one you disagree with. The idea here is that the passage evokes some kind of response in you, one that makes you want to work with the passage to make it just as meaningful as possible).  Make sure you explain precisely how you think the argument from the source you selected applies to your project as you currently see it.  Also make sure to link out to the source.

Tag this post with five keywords you think fit the source how you’re imagining it working in your paper (Note: These tags will eventually become standardized for all of the sources you will use for your inquiry project and will be the major topics you address in your work).

Class canceled.  Use this time to complete the Nuggeting Sources activity and find an array of sources (try for ten) quality sources (i.e. either scholarly or substantive sources) that will help you answer your research question and create your inquiry project.  This week will start the first in getting concrete with the outside research you will use for your inquiry project, so let’s hit the ground running.

Tuesday, October 27
Comment on three of your peers’ Nuggeting Sources posts.  Try to look for similar projects so you can possibly make research friends.

Wednesday, October 28 & Thursday, October 29

Connecting Nuggets: Find another scholarly or substantive source and nugget it, explaining its relationship to how you’re currently thinking of your inquiry project.  Make sure to link out to the source.Then, discuss the relationship between this source and the source you found and nuggeted for Monday’s post.  Key questions: What are the major commonalities and/or distinctions between them, and how do they work together to help you better understand what you want to address in your inquiry project?  

Once you have this ready, connect it back to one of the dreamer readings from Phase I.  (Look back to your Mapping my Dreamers post to help with this.)  How do you see one of the dreamers fitting into the conversation you are entering with your inquiry project?  

Design this post however you see fit: be creative and thoughtful.  Tag this post five keywords you think fit the source how you’re imagining it working in your paper. (To do this, think about how the sources work together to build the conversation.)  Also tag it synthesis.

Friday, October 30
Look to at least three of your peers’ connecting nuggets and reflect on the research of your inquiry project so far.  Key questions: What do you notice about how other projects are forming so far?  How do you see you project forming alongside your peers?  Link out to at least three of your peers’ posts (at least two outside of your class section)  and explain how you work so far compares/connects in any way.

Sunday, November 1

Write a blog post in which you reflect on this week’s research and how it is helping you pursue (and possibly begin to resolve or redirect) your inquiry question. How has your question or search terms changed? What have you found that surprised you? What continues to intrigue you about your topic? Where will you look next, and what do you hope to find?

Monday, November 2

Nuggeting Sources: Find a source you think would be helpful to you in your inquiry project and write a nugget post for it.  (Remember that a nugget is a passage from the reading that grabs you in some way and make that passage as meaningful as possible. It could be a passage that puzzles you, or intrigues you, or resonates strongly with you. It could be a passage you agree with, or one you disagree with. The idea here is that the passage evokes some kind of response in you, one that makes you want to work with the passage to make it just as meaningful as possible).  Make sure you explain precisely how you think the argument from the source you selected applies to your project as you currently see it.  Make sure to link out to the source.

 

Tag this post five keywords you think fit the source how you’re imagining it working in your paper. (To do this, think about how the sources work together to build the conversation with your Connecting Nuggets post.)

 

Tuesday, November 3
Comment on three of your peers’ Nuggeting Sources posts.  Try to look for similar projects so you can possibly make research friends.  Focus your comments on how your peers are conceptualizing their sources (the tags used to categorize the source, what they write about the source, etc.)  Ask questions.  Get curious!

Wednesday, November 4 – Friday November 6

CLICK ME ON FRIDAY IN CLASS!

Investigators Assemble!: This experience is designed to help you understand how your sources will work together as a framework for your inquiry project.  It also has multiple parts, so make sure to not sleep on this and wait until the last minute to complete everything.

Part 1: The Gathering

Take stock of the sources you have found on your own: the ones you have nuggeted and the ones you have waiting in the wings for use.  Think of these as your party of fellow investigators, equipped and ready to help you in your investigation–select at least four.

Once you have the party together, look to all of the tags you have created to categorize your sources and decide on how they can be standardized.  Shoot for five tags that are strong summations of major points in all of your outside sources.  They can now take the form of fuller thoughts/phrases rather than just a one word description.  Think of these as the major categories all of your sources address and that you may include in your inquiry project: the topics of conversation your savvy party of investigators is so, so ready to discuss.

Part 2: The Planning

Get the conversation going.  Take your fellow investigators and arrange them around the categories from Part 1, then explain how they help you in your investigation.  (Your Connecting Nuggets post should help with this.)  What does each bring to the table to address the you established?  How do they do this?  Don’t just chronologically describe what each sources contains; provide a strong summation of the core assertions the investigators make to make the discussion as robust as possible.  Let them talk and respond to each other, just like any real conversation.

Part 3: The Advising

Think long and hard about the state of the conversation from Part 2.  Look back to the three dreamers you wish to include in your inquiry project (your Mapping the Dreamers post should help with this) and bring them into the fold to address all of the categories you see fit.  Provide any insight you think the three dreamers may have given the discussion between investigators.

Part 4: The Missioning

Now that your part is complete, explain the state of your investigation and your thoughts on what you will ultimately claim and support in your inquiry project.

Design this post (or any part of it) however you see fit: be creative, detailed, and thoughtful.   Also tag it synthesis.

Sunday, November 8

Look to at least three of your peers’ Investigators Assemble! posts and reflect on the state of your project in light of them.  Key questions: What do you notice working with how others are conceptualizing their projects?  How do you see you project forming alongside your peers?  Link out to at least four of your peers’ posts (at least two outside of your class section)  and explain how you work so far compares/connects in any way.

Monday, November 9

Find a source you think would be helpful to you in your inquiry project and write a nugget post for it.  (Remember that a nugget is a passage from the reading that grabs you in some way and that you then make as meaningful as possible. It could be a passage that puzzles you, or intrigues you, or resonates strongly with you. It could be a passage you agree with, or one you disagree with. The idea here is that the passage evokes some kind of response in you, one that makes you want to work with the passage to make it just as meaningful as possible.)  Make sure you explain precisely how you think the argument from the source you selected applies to your project as you currently see it.

Make sure to link out to the source. Also link back to your previous two nugget posts for sources you yourself have found. The idea here is to gesture toward the research you have been doing so far, and provide a sense of coherence to your readers as they read about what you have been reading lately. Tag this post with five keywords that describe how you imagine your source will work in your Inquiry Project.

Tuesday, November 10

Visit other rampages blogs in the cMOOC and read their Monday nugget critically. Do you see how the three sources the author mentions fit together? Comment on at least three classmates’ nugget posts and appraise their efforts.  Key Questions: Are they quality sources?  Do they cohere in any way, or are they more of a hot mess?

Wednesday, November 11 – Friday, November 13

Concept Experience: In this activity, we would like you to map out the issues that are at stake in your project, the topics your project pertains to, and the many ways you might thereby pique the curiosity of your reader by connecting your final inquiry project to a larger set of concerns. Remember, a “live” topic is a field of contestation where people are actively arguing with each other! Beware!

Step 1 (Wed.): Brainstorm 3-5 topics that your project is relatable to (and ideally, that your sources include/are about). Check out the wikipedia page for each, scrolling to the bottom. What are people currently discussing in your topic? What are the flashpoints of disputation? Pick the one or (max) two topics that your project suggests, and describe your take on the topic in a short post.

Step 2 (Thurs): Find two sources (new sources, or two that you have already found) who agree on about 90% of the topic but differ in some way. Consider: they both can’t be right! But both are probably legit arguments backed up by evidence. Write a post in which you discuss the disagreement, why it’s important to resolve, and how their disagreement relates to your project.

Step 3 (Fri): You Make the Call! — Resolve that dispute in a blog post, explaining yourself and why you think you’re right. Include media that artfully stages a rational academic dispute (like, Rock M Sock M Robots).

Sunday, November 15

Look to your peers’ You Make the Call! posts and find at least two that are engaged with similar topics (you may have to look through a lot to find two, depending on your project). Focus on comparing your methodologies (i.e. how you’re looking at your topic and how your sources help you discuss it) to your classmate’s in order to further your thinking. Key questions: What are we working on, and why does it seem we emphasize the things we do about the internet? Are you satisfied with the set of sources you have collected? Regardless, list and link to eight sources.

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