Write about what it’s like to be an accomplished person in many spheres and then be thrust into one where you have to learn new things, think in different ways, and take time to start from the beginning.

For nearly 20 years now, I have been continuously thrust into spheres where I have to learn new things, think in different ways, and start from the beginning. This EdD journey represents yet another twist in my life. I switched from the corporate sector to the non-profit sector.  I served in church-based ministry, asset-based community development, and education simultaneously before my career trajectory positioned me directly in education (yet in a faith-based PK-5th grade environment).

I have moved up and down the East Coast before resettling here in my hometown of Richmond. I have adjusted and re-adjusted to a variety of settings and circumstances. In each place, my life consisted of different work experiences. I gained new skills and competencies. I discovered new strengths and growth opportunities. The most consistent factor in my life was raising my three children who were ages 9, 3 and 1 when I I returned to school as an adult student to earn a bachelor’s and master’s degree of social work and a master of divinity degree.

At this stage, the challenges of school work is most familiar. The new thing I’m learning is to live without having to directly raise my children as my youngest is now 18 and preparing for college. The new beginning I’m starting is as an adult living in a new home where I didn’t raise my children and driving a car that didn’t shuttle them back and forth to their activities. It feels disorienting, but in a good way. It is disorienting in a way that helps me discover a different facet of what has become a pretty amazing life.

I have taken advantage of opportunities to achieve quite a few goals. I could describe myself as a published author, ordained minister,  a trained facilitator, book publisher and founding faculty and former dean of a race and justice educational program. The implication of being an accomplished person seems antithetical to my innate tendency toward new information, new skills, and new experiences. I wouldn’t use the term “accomplished” to describe myself. I only know that when one phase ends, I’m ready for the next one to begin.