I initially wanted to perform a follow up to a diversity study I implemented last fall  at a local single-sex independent school. However, I realized that I didn’t have the bandwidth to carry out a study on my own this time. I have too many overlapping, competing obligations right now. So I reached out to two colleagues in class with whom I had previously worked. One colleague had a problem that was anchored in his context for which evaluation would be meaningful. The other colleague was already committed to working with him.

We discussed how we could address the problem in such a way that we could fulfill the requirements of the assignment. We discovered we had a solid research idea, access to data, and participants that would allow our project to be implemented without difficulty. The colleague who offered the problem as a potential project actually as the authority to research the solution. Deciding what to evaluate was relatively easy. Deciding with whom to work was an easy choice as well.

This EDLP 711 project team is one of the better teams with which I have worked during my educational and professional career. Studying our personality types, learning styles as well as Lencioni’s (2002) Five Dysfunctions of a Team during our first semester in the EdD program contributed to the ease with which we work. We articulate our strengths and acknowledge our weaknesses. Our skills are complementary. In short, we work well together.