Rutabaga: Your New Favorite Turnip

Call me swede-ie!


Health Benefits:

  • Extremely high in antioxidants and phytonutrients that help fight against cancer
  • Contains over 50% of your daily recommended vitamin C
  • Rich in potassium and manganese, which provides energy
  • Good source of zinc, a mineral that aids in the function of many enzymes

http://healthyeating.sfgate.com/DM-Resize/photos.demandstudios.com/7/25/fotolia_9245752_XS.jpg?w=360&h=360&keep_ratio=1

 


Macronutrients:

http://quitehealthy.com/nutrition-facts/food-labels/label114351.gif


Micronutrients:

  • Calcium: 66 mg
  • Iron: 0.73 mg
  • Magnesium: 32 mg
  • Phosphorus: 81 mg
  • Potassium: 472 mg
  • Sodium: 28 mg
  • Zinc: 0.48 mg
  • Vitamin C: 35.0 mg
  • Thiamine: 0.126 mg
  • Riboflavin: 0.056 mg
  • Niacin: 0.980 mg
  • Pantothenic Acid: 0.224 mg
  • Vitamin B6: 0.140 mg
  • Vitamin B12: 0 mcg
  • Folate: 29 mcg
  • Vitamin A: 3 IU
  • Vitamin E: 0.42 mg
  • Vitamin K: 0.4 mcg

Phytonutrients:

  • beta Carotene: 1 mcg
  • beta Cryptoxanthin: 0 mcg
  • Lycopene: 0 mcg
  • Lutein and Zeaxanthin: 0 mcg

In the Garden:

Ideally, rutabagas should should be harvested in Autumn when they are poking out of the ground, as seen above. They should be 3-5 inches wide, or approximately the size of a grapefruit.

If not ready for harvest, they can be left in the ground. Cover them with mulch so they do not freeze and harvest them in the spring.


Pepare and Enjoy:

Begin by cutting the rutabaga in half, then slicing those halves into half inch slabs. Peel the outer skin off of the sections with a knife and discard the skin and tops and bottom of the root.

Many people enjoy Mashed Rutabaga

  • Dice the sliced and peeled rutabaga into cubes
  • Add these cubes to a pot, adding water so that the cubes are completely covered.
  • Let the water boil, then lower to a simmer for 40-50 minutes or until tender.
  • Drain the water, then mash the vegetable with a potato masher. Add 2-3 tbsp butter and season with salt and pepper.
  • Serve hot as a side

Sources:

  • Health Benefits: http://foodfacts.mercola.com/rutabaga.html
  • Health Benefits and Photo:  http://healthyeating.sfgate.com/benefits-rutabagas-4398.html
  • Macronutrients: http://quitehealthy.com/nutrition-facts/food-labels/label114351.gif
  • Micronutrients: http://nutrition.about.com/od/fruitsandvegetables/p/Rutabagas.htm
  • Growing and photo: http://bonnieplants.com/growing/growing-rutabagas/
  • Cooking and photos: http://www.irishamericanmom.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/11/IMG_0340.jpg

29 thoughts on “Rutabaga: Your New Favorite Turnip”

  1. I’ve never heard of rutabaga before so I thought it would be interested to read about it. It’s so interesting to find out that so many different veggies can help prevent cancer! Do you like rutabaga, or did you find the veggie interesting and wanted to learn more?

  2. I really hadn’t heard much about Rutabaga before so reading your post was interesting. I learning about all the health benefits and why trying it for the first time will probably be very beneficial to me!

  3. I never had a rutabaga so I wonder how they taste. they look good from your pictures (the prepare picture) so maybe I will try them out. I should try them so I can have some energy to get me through the day!

  4. Before reading the blog post on rutabaga, I was unaware of what the vegetable was and it’s benefits. I learned that rutabaga contains powerful antioxidants, and is a good source of zinc and potassium.

  5. Awesome layout! Your blog was very well organized. I never knew what a rutabaga was until now . What other benefits are there from eating rutabagas.

  6. I clicked on this vegetable because I didn’t know what it was, but I liked the name. I was surprised to find out that this vegetable can contain 50% or more of your daily vitamin C. I think I would consider trying this, but I’m not even sure if I have ever seen them in the grocery store!

  7. As rare as this vegetable is, I have heard about it! Many people plant this type of turnip for animals, especially deer. It is interesting that it can be eaten like mashed potatoes. Do you know any other vegetables that have this much protein?

  8. I have never eaten or even heard of this veggie before and I’m thankful that i’m aware of it and it’s nutrients.

  9. I have never seen or heard about Rutabaga. I don’t know where I might see one. I like the recipe on mashed Rutabaga looks like it might be a good substitute to mashed potatoes .I am not sure how it might taste though but I will not mind trying it.

  10. I enjoyed reading about rutabagas. It’s a vegetable that I have yet to eat, but always wondered why they’re sold in super markets- but now I know why! It’s always good to see a whole food that aids in preventing cancer, as well as helping out the immune system. I couldn’t believe that rutabagas contain more than 50% of daily recommendation for vitamin C. I definitely know where to go when flu season starts!

  11. I have seen this vegetable at the grocery store and always felt like it looked like something out of a movie. I think I will try this recipe because I love trying new food.

  12. I didn’t know Rutabagas were a turnip. They do look just like them, especially in the way they grow from the ground. I do not think I’ll be eating any because they do not seem to have much flavor.

  13. I have never heard about this vegetable before. I like your recipe I want to try and see how this type of turnip taste mashed up.

  14. hmm i don’t know if I will ever try rutabaga. I honestly never heard of it before this assignment. I like how it a good source of energy. I could use all the energy i can get.

  15. I had to read your blog, because I wasn’t even aware that such a vegetable existed. You are right that it resembles a turnip. Is it a type of turnip? I will definitely try rutabagas next time, and utilize it in an energizing meal.

  16. I really like the set up of your blog, really easy to read! I had no idea what rutabaga’s were until I read this. A kind of potato? That’s really interesting!

  17. ive never heard of this veggie before but the mashed rutabagas looks like a good substitute for mashed potatoes. its awesome that they dont have a certain harvest time but can be simply left and harvested once they are ready

  18. I try to eat and shop seasonally, meaning that usually do not eat things that a re out of season. Because of this, I usually only have rutabaga in the Autumn. But, thanks to your tip, I’ll try to look for them in the Spring now as well. I never thought of mashing them either. I’ll try the recipe as soon as I can. Were you as surprised as me to learn just how nutritious they are?

  19. Man, there are so many vegetables that I didn’t even know existed! I have to admit this vegetable did not look so appealing when it was in the ground but sliced up it looked very appealing. I can’t wait to try this veggie out, is there any other recipes you might recommend?

  20. I really liked that you provided detailed instructions as to how to prepare rutabaga as I have never ate it before! I will keep that in mind next time I get the chance to try this new vegetable out! Reading your blog makes me want to try rutabaga out especially because it has a very high content of Vitamin C, as well as, providing our body with energy!

  21. I like the recipe you used at the end of the blog.The recipe likened the rutabaga to mashed potato recipe so it made it easier to understand and relate it.I don’t know much about this vegetable so this has definitely helped me to learn more about it.Though,I have never had a rutabaga and I don’t think the blog has changed my mind.

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