Making Activity: Squishy Circuits

In class on March 20, 2018, we created three sculptures using Play-Doh, clay, and electrical circuits. Each of the three sculptures focused on a different content area and SOL—science, math, and history.

My group’s first sculpture relates to VA Science SOL 4.3, which focuses on the understanding of electricity. Our sculpture represents Benjamin Franklin’s famous kite experiment through which he better understood lightning and electricity. We chose to light up the lightning bolt with the lightbulbs to illustrate how lightning struck the kite, which conducted the electricity through the string into the key. Students would be able to use this visual to understand how electricity works and the difference between conductors and insulators.

My group’s second sculpture relates to VA Math SOL 1.8, which focuses on the understanding of telling time using analog and digital clocks. Our sculpture represents an analog clock with an hour hand and a minute hand. Students would be able to use this visual to practice telling time correctly. The lights can be adjusted to turn on when the student has illustrated the correct time and off when the student has illustrated the incorrect time (using clay, which is not a conductor of electricity).

My group’s third sculpture relates to VA History SOL 1.4, which focuses on recognizing map symbols and the identifying the shapes of the United States and Virginia. Our sculpture represents the state of Virginia with the lightbulb on our capital, Richmond. We also created a compass with North, South, East, and West directions. Students would be able to use this visual to identify different places on a map, as well as their significance—important people and events that occurred at these specific places.