Blog Post #10: Social Media Lesson

SOL:  English 3.5 The student will read and demonstrate comprehension of fictional text and poetry. (i. identify the main idea)

Learning Outcome: Given a teacher-facilitated classroom Twitter with poems and passages from fictional text and a course-related hashtag, the student will be able to choose a text from the Twitter (or one of their own), identify the main idea, and tell why it is meaningful to them via Twitter.

TPACK:

Content: SOL 3.5 The student will read and demonstrate comprehension of fictional text and poetry. (i. identify the main idea)

  • The focus will be on identifying the main idea of a poem or fictional text.
  • Students may have more difficulty identifying the main idea of a fictional passage because it may not be as clear as the main idea of a poem.

Pedagogy: Social interaction (discussion via social media)

Technology: Twitter

Pedagogical-Content Knowledge (PCK):

  • Social interaction and discussion allows students to ask questions of their teacher and/or peers and communicate their understanding of the main idea of their chosen text.

Technological-Content Knowledge (TCK):

  • As a social media platform, Twitter allows students to demonstrate their understanding of a main idea of a poem or fictional text in a way that is public for the teacher and peers.

Technological-Pedagogical Knowledge (TPK):

  • Students are able to engage in social interaction and discussion via Twitter.

Assessment: Students will choose a text or poem of their liking from the classroom Twitter account or elsewhere. They will retweet with a comment using the class hashtag, identifying the main idea and telling why the text is meaningful to them. All of the responses will be able to be viewed through the specific hashtag, which will also allow for both the students and the teacher to communicate back and forth.

Blog Post #3: TPACK Lesson 2

TPACK Lesson (Map Skills)

Content:

Geography 2.5 “The student will develop map skills by a) locating the equator, the seven continents, and the five oceans on maps and globes.”

The instruction will focus on locating the equator, the seven continents, and the five oceans on maps and globes, based on the following misconceptions:

  • the equator is another line among latitude and longitude lines (students must understand the purpose and location of the equator)

  • land is not divided in a certain way (students must understand the boundaries of continents)

  • the Earth is flat (students must understand the difference between a map and globe-different representations)

  • there is one big ocean (student must understand the boundaries of the five oceans)

Pedagogy:

The TPACK lesson will begin with students watching the teacher model how the Earth can be represented in two different ways by peeling an orange—the unpeeled orange represents a globe and the orange peel represents a map. Then, using the Smartboard to present a map visual, the teacher will have students come up to highlight the equator among latitude and longitude lines. Students will then be able to learn about the seven continents and five oceans by learning and singing songs about these concepts as a whole class. Finally, the students will be split into groups and have the opportunity to create their own globe using a beach ball and a given map template with the continents and oceans as puzzle pieces.

Technology:

  • Orange
  • Smartboard (map)
  • Music
  • Beach ball
  • Map template (puzzle pieces)
  • Colored pencils/markers
  • Scissors
  • Glue

PCK (Pedagogical-Content Knowledge):

The students will use visual representations—the orange being peeled and the map on the Smartboard, auditory activities—singing songs, and  kinesthetic activities—putting together a map puzzle (pedagogy) to expand their knowledge of the equator, the seven continents, and the five oceans (content).

TCK (Technological-Content Knowledge):

The students will use the orange (technology) to learn about the different representations of the Earth (content), the Smartboard (technology) to learn about the location of the equator (content), music (technology) to learn about the seven continents and the five oceans (content), and the map template and beach ball (technology) to learn about the boundaries of the continents and oceans and how they come together to create a map/globe (content).

TPK (Technological-Pedagogical Knowledge):

The students will use the orange and map on Smartboard (technology) as a visual representation (pedagogy), the music (technology) as an auditory activity (pedagogy), and the map template and beach ball (technology) as a kinesthetic activity (pedagogy).

Digital Resources:

Blog Post #2: TPACK Lesson

My group’s TPACK lesson on the Math Measurement SOL 3.11 focuses on telling time to the nearest minute using analog and digital clocks, as well as telling elapsed time in one-hour increments over a 12-hour period. Misconceptions/difficulties that students may have in their understanding about this content include the difference between the hour and minute hand (and even the second hand) and the association of the numbers on the clock to the minutes in an hour, which are in five-minute increments.

The content for this lesson mostly focuses on 3.11a, telling time to the nearest minute using analog and digital clocks. The pedagogy for the lesson would begin with a whole group demonstration, where the teacher models the use of an analog clock to tell time by moving the hour and minute hands to show different times. In addition to this modeling, the teacher could also show students an example of a digital clock, an alarm clock or the clock at the bottom or top of the computer screen, and how to read the time. After the whole group lesson, students can work individually in their table groups to construct their own clock using materials such as paper plates, pointers for the hands, stick-on numbers, a pin for the middle of the clock, and pencils/markers to decorate. After the students construct their clocks, they will have a chance to practice showing and telling different times on their clocks with their table groups (using a worksheet to guide their practice).

An example of a student-constructed paper clock for practice

Link for directions/ideas on how to make a paper clock: https://www.muminthemadhouse.com/make-paper-plate-clock/

The technology for this lesson would include the analog and digital clocks used for teacher modeling, the materials for the student clocks (paper plates, pointers, stick-on numbers, pins, and pencils/markers), as well as the worksheet used for practicing telling time.