Blog 9: A Serial Killer and Dark Networks

Posted by & filed under SNA, SNA Posts, socialnetworkanalysis.

The first article that I found that appied SNA to crime really piqued my interests.  Bichler, Lim, and Larkin (2012) sought to determine if SNA could offer a complementary theory and empirical methods to crime pattern theory  for linking people based on shared activities.  They believed that SNA could be applied to identifying relative suspects […]

Blog 9: Team Cohesion and Peer Influence

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Article 1 Warner, Matthews, and Dixon (2012), sought to more fully understand the relationship between team cohesion and team performance.  In order to achieve this understanding, the study used SNA to look at the structural cohesiveness of two different women’s college basketball teams. At four different points during the basketball season, the team members completed […]

Blog 9: Friendships

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Drawing from my psychology background and great interest to learn more about childrens’ learning paths and experience, I focused my search for these two articles upon developmental aspects of a child’s growth, their friendships, and the use of social network analysis. First, the work by Shin and Ryan (2014) investigated early adolescent friendship selection and […]

Blog 8: Identification of influential spreaders in online social networks using interaction weighted K-core decomposition method

Posted by & filed under SNA, SNA Posts, socialnetworkanalysis.

As we all know, online social networks are a key component of everyday life.  More and more of our interactions with others are taking place online through social media sites such as Instagram and Twitter. Al-garadi, Varathan, and Ravana (2017), sought to improve the existing K-core method for online social networks by using a link-weighing […]

Blog 7 – Theories of Networks

Posted by & filed under mldebusklane, SNA, SNA Posts, SNA18, socialnetworkanalysis.

The construct of a “public sphere” was presented by Habermas as the “nexus between public life and civil society,” whereby the sphere exists outside organized and institutional influence. Although disconnected from government or organized institutional influence, the public sphere is an integral component to a democratic society, whereby citizens can discuss, agree, or disagree with […]

Blog 7: Changing Networks

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Habermas and Castells present two very interesting perspectives related to the field of social network analysis. According to Habermas, the public sphere is the connection between public life and civil society emerging as a neutral space when individuals can discuss their concerns freely and democratically to form public opinion (Habermas, 1974). Ideally, the public sphere […]

Blog 6 – Research Plan

Posted by & filed under mldebusklane, SNA, SNA Posts, SNA18, socialnetworkanalysis.

In general, my work tends to involve both student motivation at large (Bae & DeBusk-Lane, 2018) and writing motivation more specifically (Ekholm, Zumbrunn, & DeBusk-Lane, 2017; Zumbrunn, Ekholm, Stringer, McKnight, & DeBusk-Lane, 2017). In short, my personal passion involves using person-centered approaches, namely Latent Transition, Profile, and Class Analyses to assess latent groups of students’ […]

Blog 6: Friendship and Risky Behavior

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The main focus for my research over the course of my studies in the Criminal Justice program are the factors that compell an adolescent to participate in deviant behavior.  An adolescent’s environment  is one of the factors that affects an adolescent’s behavior. Therefore, my question for this research project is do adolescent peers have an […]