Blog 10: Hackers and Smokers

Posted by & filed under SNA, SNA18, socialnetworkanalysis, ThomasChon.

The first article used social network analysis to understand the network structure of the hacker group “Shadowcrew.” Due to rapid advancements in information technology, the authors were attempting to assess how hackers were interacting and communicating within this deviant group to develop their existing network structure. Research question:  The study had 4 research questions: 1. …

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Blog 9: Social Network Analysis at the Community and Friend Levels

Posted by & filed under SNA, SNA18, socialnetworkanalysis, ThomasChon.

The first study investigated collaborations networks in the social work academic community using social network analysis. Their research question: have collaboration networks for scholars in the social work community changed overtime?  Their sole source of data was the Social Work Research Database which is a comprehensive collection of published social work articles.  The sample population …

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Blog 8: K-Core Decomposition and Density Mapping of the Cerebral Cortex.

Posted by & filed under SNA, SNA18, socialnetworkanalysis, ThomasChon.

Drawing on my neuroscience background, I chose a study that operationalized k-core decomposition and density to understand the structure of the human cerebral cortex.   Their research question: how can the cerebral cortex be mapped quantitatively to help us understand process and function.  Prior research has looked at connectivity within the cerebral cortex, but they were …

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Blog 7: The Public Sphere, Old and New.

Posted by & filed under SNA, SNA18, socialnetworkanalysis, ThomasChon.

Public sphere as a construct is introduced by Habermas.  The public sphere represents a neutral common where people can share opinions and thoughts engaging in democracy outside of governmental or organizational influence (Habermas, 1989).  Its formation can be traced back to 18th century Europe when feudalism and church power were both dissipating creating a vacuum.  …

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Blog 6: AHA PAC in response to HVBP

Posted by & filed under SNA, SNA18, socialnetworkanalysis, ThomasChon.

My research project will attempt to answer the question of how the American Hospital Association Political Action Committee (AHA PAC) has responded, in terms of political financial contributions, to the introduction and implementation of the Hospital Value-Base Purchasing (HVBP) Program by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS).  More specifically, three time periods will …

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Blog 5: Data Collection and Analysis for SNA

Posted by & filed under SNA, SNA18, socialnetworkanalysis, ThomasChon.

Social network analysis can take place via name generators that ask questions regarding interactions of an ego to alters.  These questions are related to role-relation, interaction, exchange, and affective (values).  Once the names of relevant parties are obtained, name interpreters, in the form of follow-up questions, provides demographic and relationship information regarding connections between alter …

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Blog 4: Social Capital

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Social capital can be understood under the framework of a social network (Lin, 1999).   It is an “investment in social relations with expected returns.” At the same time, social capital must be measured using “embedded resources in social networks.”  Following this logic, for us to understand social capital, we must study how it is developed …

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Blog 3 – Node Centrality is a Small World Network

Posted by & filed under SNA, SNA18, socialnetworkanalysis, ThomasChon.

A quote from Bonnie Frickson, helps us to understand the effects of centrality, “I argue that interpersonal processes vary with the kind of larger structural unit within which individual ties are embedded.”  Not all central nodes are created equal and to provide context, different forms of centrality must be defined. Degree centrality: is related to the …

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Blog 2: Social Networks

Posted by & filed under SNA, SNA18, socialnetworkanalysis, ThomasChon.

The readings this week really helped me to look at networks from an enriched, more detailed perspective.   Research into networks deals with more than just personal attributes but with how people interact in relationships (Keim, 2011). The subset of lettered nodes in the picture above represent relationships that contribute to the whole.  The collection of …

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