Narrative Perspective and the Presidency

Narrative Perspective and the Presidency

Overview

The focus of this unit is on narrative perspective. The topic used to enforce this is the presidency. Students will learn about the different facets of the President’s and Vice President’s life and those who support the President of the United States. Students will gain an understanding of how point of view works in narratives as well as how the choice of language, setting, and characters contributes to the development of plot and perspective. Students will use these skills to identify the narrator of a story, make predictions, draw conclusions, differentiate between fiction and non-fiction, and summarize information. Students will know how to change perspective in writing and identify different points of view in readings. This is an important skill for students to be able to identify in a variety of texts and contexts as well as learn to replicate and experiment themselves in their own writing. To this end, this unit features a diverse text set which will be relatable and engaging to students. By utilizing topics of interest such as fun presidential facts, students will be motivated and comfortable to expand and explore in their learning.

Description of Students

This text set is intended for grades 2nd-3rd and includes texts from a 2nd grade reading level to a 5th grade reading level. These intended students have a wide range of ability and the diversity of texts work to provide needed inclusion as well as help students gain confidence with text features such as maps, charts, and captions. With multiple elections occurring at various levels, and the students beginning their exploration into United States social studies, the presidency serves as a good theme to introduce and work through the literary topics of point of view, prediction, and summary.

Targeted SOLs

SOLs targeted through this unit include: 3.3 The student will read and demonstrate comprehension of fictional texts, literary nonfiction, and poetry. c) Make, confirm, and revise predictions. d) Compare and contrast settings, characters, and plot events. e) Summarize plot events. f) Identify the narrator of a story. g) Ask and answer questions about what is read. h) Draw conclusions using the text for support. i) Identify the conflict and resolution. j) Identify the theme. l) Differentiate between fiction and nonfiction. 3.6 The student will read and demonstrate comprehension of nonfiction texts. a) Identify the author’s purpose. c) Preview and use text features including table of contents, headings, pictures, captions, maps, indices, and charts. d) Ask and answer questions about what is read using the text for support. e) Draw conclusions using the text for support. f) Summarize information found in nonfiction texts. g) Identify the main idea. h) Identify supporting details. 4.5 The student will read and demonstrate comprehension of fictional texts, literary nonfiction, and poetry. a) Describe how the choice of language, setting, and characters contributes to the development of plot. b) Identify the theme(s). c) Summarize events in the plot. d) Identify genres. e) Identify the narrator of a story and the speaker of a poem. f) Identify the conflict and resolution. g) Identify sensory words. h) Draw conclusions/make inferences about text using the text as support. i) Compare/contrast details in literary and informational nonfiction texts. j) Identify cause-and-effect relationships.

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