Reflection

The class has gone by so quickly! It was fascinating to learn how the online experience has developed from what was initially provided for behavioral issues and credit recovery into what it has become today.  I think I have learned a lot more about how to effectively use online communication with my flipped class.  I plan on using Twitter to a greater extent to share what we are doing in our class.  I also think I can use the communication functions on Schoology to improve my online communication with students.  At this time I believe that the Flipped/Blended learning model combines the strengths of both the classroom resources and the online resources.   I think that the Flipped/Blended learning design encourages greater teacher–student and student-student interaction and allows for increased student-centered learning.

By carefully choosing a LMS like Schoology that allows for both good communication and the ability to adjust the structure of the course, I think I can create a very effective learning experience for my students.  I thoroughly enjoyed exploring the iNACOL website and The Universal Design for Learning website and I hope to use these as I continue to work on developing my Flipped online presence.  I am not sure that I will always use the TPACK model, but I did find it to be a very useful way to be sure that I include all of the important components in a lesson that involves the use of technology.  I also enjoyed reading about the roles of the online instructor.  This article really challenged me to think about what I do well and what I need to work on.  I have always enjoyed finding and designing materials to enhance the learning experience.  I think it will just take me a little longer to find those really good online resources that will enhance the online component of my flipped class.

At first I found the blogging a bit difficult, since it was not something I ever do.  After a while I became more comfortable with it and finally I actually enjoyed it. I honestly think it is a very good way to reflect on the assigned readings.  It was also nice to read and comment on other’s ideas.  I think all of the assignments we had in class really helped me to develop my learning module.  I enjoyed the voyage from MOOCs to virtual reality.  I can see a great future for online education;  it is so much more than I thought in the beginning.  I know there is so much more out there to learn.  I am going to try and focus my attention on the online component of the flipped/blended model.

I think this was very good foundational course. The choice of readings and websites was excellent.  The introduction to TPACK was extremely useful.  The chance to apply the TPACK model to a lesson in our module was also very instructive.  I am glad that you let us use other lesson methods to complete our module.  Thank you for a great experience.

 

Final – Final

I was able to complete all five of the lessons that I had planned for my Gas Law topic.  This is a chemistry topic that all chemistry students must master for the chemistry SOL.   My module is designed for a flipped class.   I sought to expand my module to include more online resources and a greater online presence than I usually have in my typical flipped lessons. Since I have laptop computers in my classroom, some of my online resources were completed by pairs of students in the classroom in a self-pacing environment.  The online homework assignments were done individually with feedback from me or immediate feedback from the online quiz program.

I would particularly appreciate feedback on the choices of online resources that I used for the  in-class activities and those that I chose for the individual homework assignments.  I would also like some suggestions for some more student-student involvement.   I have added discussions for many of the lessons, but I really would like some other choices for student – student interactions.

I learned a great deal in the process of developing this module.  I thoroughly enjoyed searching out and discovering all of the resources that I used in my module.  There are so many wonderful sites out there… it is often really difficult to make a choice… but it is so much fun to just explore!  I was also able to make and improve a few of the video lectures that used in the module.  I think I have a much better understanding of the components needed for an effective online experience. I am excited to continue to work on improving the online component in my flipped class.

I am not sure exactly how I want you to evaluate my module, just give me your candid opinion on what I did well and where I need to improve. I do plan on using the module in the next few months and I can change the areas where you think I need to improve.

Virtual Reality and Science

I found the video lecture on virtual reality fascinating! I agree that it was certainly worth the time spent watching it.  I was a little skeptical about the application of VR to education until the speaker showed the virtual exploration of the coral reef.  Once I saw that then I was then able to imagine many uses for virtual reality in the science arena.  Teachers would be able to have students conduct laboratory experiments that were perhaps too expensive or dangerous to do face to face.  I can imagine a scenario where we would conduct an experiment face to face and then revisit the experiment virtually.  It is often too expensive and time consuming to repeat our experiments in the chemistry lab, but being able to have a virtual second and third trial would be wonderful.  I also see virtual reality used in virtual field trips to places that we would never be able to go…. nuclear power plants and medical laboratories.  I am really excited about this application of VR.

I am not so sold on the use of gaming virtual reality.  I do not see an application for this in my class at this time, but I can certainly see how it can be applied to other learning situations.  I think I need to spend some more time reading and exploring this. The idea of the virtual teacher is not only intriguing, but also a bit spooky and scary.  I can see how students would be upset if they found out that what they were perceiving as real teacher feedback was not “real” at all.  I think that could certainly destroy the student – teacher trust factor.

Status of Module

I have completed five lessons in my gas law module.  Each lesson covers about two days of class time.  At this point I do not think I need anymore lessons to fully cover this topic for my honors chemistry class.   I will certainly be using this module with my flipped chemistry class.  We do not cover this material until second semester so I still have time to add resources l as I come across them.    As of now I am happy with the module.  I feel that I have a nice blend of online and in class activities.  When I have the chance to use the module second semester, I am sure that I will find some things that I want to add or change.  I really enjoy searching out online resources, so I can see me adding or changing some of the materials as I move through the lessons.

MOOC

MOOC – Massive Open Online Course… and they do mean massive! I could not believe the size of some of the courses. But if only about 4% of students complete the course how can they be considered successful?  I can see how they would appeal to self-regulated learners, adults and college level students.  I can see how the cost efficiency would appeal to institutions.  The ability to interact with students from all over the world and top instructors would also be enticing.  But the social aspect that must be missing from these courses would make them disastrous for high school learners.  Younger learners and indeed even older learners need and want more teacher – student interaction.

My module could not be offered as a MOOC.  It requires face to face interactions for laboratory experiments and difficult conceptual concepts…. and well just “fun with science”!    I like many of the online teaching methods we have been exposed to in this class, and I can see using or adapting many of them to my blended/flipped classroom.  I cannot see a use at all for a MOOC at the high school level.  The idea that students can participate as much or as little as they want, would not work with high school students…. many would simply not participate and then would probably still be surprised when they failed the class. Younger students need to be held accountable on a daily basis. Student at the high school level still need that all important teacher feedback to be motivated.

I do incorporate some of the components of a MOOC in my flipped class. The video lectures that I make and publish on my personal YouTube channel have been watched by my own students, but also by hundreds of other students that I will never meet.

Final Plan

My Gas Law module covers a topic that is required for all chemistry students.   I hope to create 3 (maybe 4) of the 6 lessons that I have planned for this module before the end of the semester.  I teach Gas Laws during the second semester so I do have time later on to add to this module.  I definitely plan on using this module with my flipped class, so many of the online activities will be done in class with lab pairs or groups.  As I continue to add to and tweak this module, I am working to decided which activities work best for group online work and which work best for individual online homework assignments. Any feedback in this area would be greatly appreciated from other teachers and Monty.  I am also in need of  ideas for discussion boards.  This is area that does not come naturally for me and I see that many others are very creative in their  the use of discussion boards.

Final TPACK

Lesson Description

This is a lesson that introduces the conceptual understandings needed to further study the gas laws.  The lesson will be a qualitative inquiry introduction to the gas laws that will lead to later lessons that have a more quantitative viewpoint.  In this lesson, students will use online interactive computer tutorials, computer interface probes with graphical analysis software, and videos to investigate the relationships involved in the gas laws. The lesson will run for two ninety minute blocks. The students will come together as a whole group at the end of the lesson to share and discuss their lab videos. The students involved in the lesson are honors high school sophomores and juniors.

 The main Content (C) of this lesson is:

  • The relationship between pressure and temperature for a gas.
  • The relationship between temperature and volume for a gas.
  • The relationship between volume and pressure for a gas.

The main Pedagogy (P) of this lesson is inquiry based learning.

The main Technology (T) of this lesson is:

  • Laptop computers
  • Computer laboratory probes with graphical analysis software
  • Cell phones or cameras for video production
  • Schoology LMS

Pedagogical Content Knowledge (PCK)

 Describe:  Inquiry-based learning works well when teaching the gas laws as much of the content is conceptual and requires the development of  mental models.  Having students investigate and discover the answers on their own has worked well in previous assignments of this type.  Students are given strict guidelines as to where to go to perform their investigations, but they have the freedom to choose the order and manner in which they explore the topics.  Students are also given freedom and creativity in choosing how to exhibit their understanding with the final video assessment project.

Support: In my AP institute we looked at the work of Vygotsky and Dewey. Their work showed that inquiry-based learning significantly improved student science achievement scores.

Technological Content Knowledge (TCK)

 Describe:  The websites chosen allow the students to study the conceptual relationships between pressures, volumes and temperatures of gasses.  The websites use interactive tutorials and animations that help students to develop mental models of gas behavior.  The questions that follow the interactive tutorials allow the students to test their understanding of the concepts.  If they cannot answer a significant number of the questions successfully they are automatically sent back to the tutorial to determine their misconceptions. If students do not have a firm grasp on the conceptual behavior of gases they will struggle later with the mathematical applications.

  • https://www.simbucket.com/gasestut.swf
  • https://www.simbucket.com/gasesprob.swf
  • https://phet.colorado.edu/en/simulation/gas-properties

The inquiry laboratory investigations for this lesson can be done when the conceptual understanding from the interactive tutorials is complete. The laboratory procedures use laptop computers and computer interface probes that allow students to collect and interpret data. The laboratory procedures chosen allow the students to conduct a series of experiments, each of which illustrates a different gas property.  They will be given a list of equipment and materials and some general guidelines to help them get started with each experiment.  Three properties of gases will be investigated: pressure, volume, and temperature.  By assembling the equipment, conducting the appropriate tests, and analyzing their data and observations, they will be able to describe the properties of gases qualitatively.  The inquiry nature of the experiments lets the students explore and reinforce their conceptual understanding.

Support: In my AP institute we looked at research that  showed that students engaged in inquiry-based learning in the laboratory demonstrated improved learning and higher test scores

Technological Pedagogical Knowledge (TPK)

Describe:  The use of the interactive websites and computer interface labs help to make the lesson more interactive and exciting. Students often struggle with the abstract concepts in chemistry. It is important to use models online where manipulation and visualization of science concepts can be explored. The use of these interactive models allows students to discover scientific knowledge rather than just being given the facts.  Students also need to see the physical results of their conceptual understanding in the laboratory. The use of the laboratory probes and graphic analysis software makes the lesson very inquiry based, allowing students to develop a deeper understanding of the abstract concepts.  As a final summary assessment, each lab table (four students) will make a short video discussing the results of one of their gas law experiments and share it. The LMS Schoology has a nice media sharing function built in. The students can upload their videos into this media folder and share them with all of the classes.  I have found that when students make videos of their laboratory results they seem to take more ownership of and have a deeper understanding of the content.

Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge (TPACK)

Describe: A variety of activities were chosen to involve the students in the complex concepts of gas law behavior.  Integrating the interactive tutorials, the inquiry labs with the graphical software and the video production heightens the student engagement and hopefully creates a depth of understanding beyond a simple teacher-centered lesson.   Chemistry topics are great for inquiry-based learning because of their natural investigative nature. Learning chemistry requires students to ask questions and solve problems and this fits perfectly with inquiry-based learning.

Self Regulated Learning in the Flipped Class

If self-regulated learners need to be aware of their academic strengths and weaknesses, I worry that many of my Honors students, even some of my AP students have not yet reached this level of maturity.  Students that are self-regulated learners enjoy challenges and opportunities to practice and develop a deeper understanding of the subject matter.  They know that this will lead them to success. They are successful because they have the skills to manage their learning environment.  Their success breeds success.  This is such an important skill for students to have.  I see this as a skill that is lacking in most high school students.  As a teacher devoted to the flipped classroom method of teaching,  I believe that the flipped class can help students to become better self-regulated learners.  The module that I am developing is built around the flipped classroom approach.

In a flipped class, students are required to learn content knowledge on their own prior to class and are then asked to work in groups to apply this knowledge during face to face class time. For the students who are new to this method of learning, they may be initially frustrated, since it requires them to learn content knowledge alone at home instead of being taught by teachers in a classroom. Because of this they may come unprepared for in-class learning activities, which can result in low performance in class.

Therefore, although the flipped classroom is useful in offering access to content knowledge and opportunities for students to self-regulate their learning process, not every student is capable of taking advantage of these opportunities. Giving students control over their learning process is necessary in the flipped classroom, and self-regulated learning becomes a crucial part of the success in flipped classroom learning. I am still struggling with how to make this work with my students.

I have found that the flipped nature of my class, tends to force students to become more independent in their learning. For students that are excited about the course, the flipped nature of the class can be very rewarding.  I make so many resources available online that interested students can really get a much deeper understanding of the material than they would have from a traditional lecture-based class.  For the students who are not as motivated, the material online does not seem to help them and they are not as successful.  As one student told me, “I don’t like all this online stuff”.   Is it because they are self-regulated learners that the flipped classroom works for them or is it because they are interested in the material that they are self-regulated learners??

The method that I use for the first exposure to a lesson is usually a video lecture that I have prepared. They need to write notes from the video lecture. The flipped class assignments that follow the video can vary; from online quizzes to worksheets to short writing assignments, but in each case the task provides a small incentive (a few points) for students to come to class prepared. The pre-class assignments that my students complete online as evidence of their preparation for class also help me to assess their understanding and tailor the class activities to focus on areas where they are struggling.

I use automatically graded quizzes that can help students pinpoint areas where they need help. This seems to be very motivating for the students that are SRL. They retake the quizzes and come in to ask about questions they missed. Furthermore, the immediate feedback that occurs in the flipped classroom also helps students recognize and think about their own growing understanding. I particularly find the short answer questions that students submit as evidence of their understanding to be effective.  I provide quick and positive feedback to each student and this seems to help them feel more confident in their learning progress. Consistent positive feedback seems to be the best way to encourage students to work harder and more independently.

In a flipped class if the students gain basic knowledge outside of class, then they need to spend class time to promote deeper learning. If the student cannot become a self-regulated learner then they will not be able to gain the basic knowledge outside of class and the flipped class will not work very well for them. If I am going to use the flipped class then I must try and help my students become better self-regulated learners.  I must design my online resources to facilitate their progress in become SRL.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TPACK2

I moved the use and support for video production to TPK as you suggested and added a final statement to TPACK.  The changes are in bold.



Lesson Description

This is a lesson that introduces the conceptual understandings needed to further study the gas laws.  The lesson will be a qualitative inquiry introduction to the gas laws that will lead to later lessons that have a more quantitative viewpoint.  In this lesson, students will use online interactive computer tutorials, computer interface probes with graphical analysis software, and videos to investigate the relationships involved in the gas laws. The lesson will run for two ninety minute blocks. The students will come together as a whole group at the end of the lesson to share and discuss their lab videos. The students involved in the lesson are honors high school sophomores and juniors.

 The main Content (C) of this lesson is:

  • The relationship between pressure and temperature for a gas.
  • The relationship between temperature and volume for a gas.
  • The relationship between volume and pressure for a gas.

The main Pedagogy (P) of this lesson is inquiry based learning.

The main Technology (T) of this lesson is:

  • Laptop computers
  • Computer laboratory probes with graphical analysis software
  • Cell phones or cameras for video production
  • Schoology LMS

Pedagogical Content Knowledge (PCK)

 Describe:  Inquiry-based learning works well when teaching the gas laws as much of the content is conceptual and requires the development of  mental models.  Having students investigate and discover the answers on their own has worked well in previous assignments of this type.  Students are given strict guidelines as to where to go to perform their investigations, but they have the freedom to choose the order and manner in which they explore the topics.  Students are also given freedom and creativity in choosing how to exhibit their understanding with the final video assessment project.

Support: In my AP institute we looked at the work of Vygotsky and Dewey. Their work showed that inquiry-based learning significantly improved student science achievement scores.

Technological Content Knowledge (TCK)

 Describe:  The websites chosen allow the students to study the conceptual relationships between pressures, volumes and temperatures of gasses.  The websites use interactive tutorials and animations that help students to develop mental models of gas behavior.  The questions that follow the interactive tutorials allow the students to test their understanding of the concepts.  If they cannot answer a significant number of the questions successfully they are automatically sent back to the tutorial to determine their misconceptions. If students do not have a firm grasp on the conceptual behavior of gases they will struggle later with the mathematical applications.

  • https://www.simbucket.com/gasestut.swf
  • https://www.simbucket.com/gasesprob.swf
  • https://phet.colorado.edu/en/simulation/gas-properties

The inquiry laboratory investigations for this lesson can be done when the conceptual understanding from the interactive tutorials is complete. The laboratory procedures use laptop computers and computer interface probes that allow students to collect and interpret data. The laboratory procedures chosen allow the students to conduct a series of experiments, each of which illustrates a different gas property.  They will be given a list of equipment and materials and some general guidelines to help them get started with each experiment.  Three properties of gases will be investigated: pressure, volume, and temperature.  By assembling the equipment, conducting the appropriate tests, and analyzing their data and observations, they will be able to describe the properties of gases qualitatively.  The inquiry nature of the experiments lets the students explore and reinforce their conceptual understanding.

Support: In my AP institute we looked at research that  showed that students engaged in inquiry-based learning in the laboratory demonstrated improved learning and higher test scores

Technological Pedagogical Knowledge (TPK)

Describe:  The use of the interactive websites and computer interface labs help to make the lesson more interactive and exciting. Students often struggle with the abstract concepts in chemistry. It is important to use models online where manipulation and visualization of science concepts can be explored. The use of these interactive models allows students to discover scientific knowledge rather than just being given the facts.  Students also need to see the physical results of their conceptual understanding in the laboratory. The use of the laboratory probes and graphic analysis software makes the lesson very inquiry based, allowing students to develop a deeper understanding of the abstract concepts.  As a final summary assessment, each lab table (four students) will make a short video discussing the results of one of their gas law experiments and share it. The LMS Schoology has a nice media sharing function built in. The students can upload their videos into this media folder and share them with all of the classes.  I have found that when students make videos of their laboratory results they seem to take more ownership of and have a deeper understanding of the content.

Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge (TPACK)

Describe: A variety of activities were chosen to involve the students in the complex concepts of gas law behavior.  Integrating the interactive tutorials, the inquiry labs with the graphical software and the video production heightens the student engagement and hopefully creates a depth of understanding beyond a simple teacher-centered lesson.   Chemistry topics are great for inquiry-based learning because of their natural investigative nature. Learning chemistry requires students to ask questions and solve problems and this fits perfectly with inquiry-based learning.

TPACK2

I moved the use and support for video production to TPK as you suggested and added a final statement to TPACK.  The changes are in bold.



 

Lesson Description

This is a lesson that introduces the conceptual understandings needed to further study the gas laws.  The lesson will be a qualitative inquiry introduction to the gas laws that will lead to later lessons that have a more quantitative viewpoint.  In this lesson, students will use online interactive computer tutorials, computer interface probes with graphical analysis software, and videos to investigate the relationships involved in the gas laws. The lesson will run for two ninety minute blocks. The students will come together as a whole group at the end of the lesson to share and discuss their lab videos. The students involved in the lesson are honors high school sophomores and juniors.

 The main Content (C) of this lesson is:

  • The relationship between pressure and temperature for a gas.
  • The relationship between temperature and volume for a gas.
  • The relationship between volume and pressure for a gas.

The main Pedagogy (P) of this lesson is inquiry based learning.

The main Technology (T) of this lesson is:

  • Laptop computers
  • Computer laboratory probes with graphical analysis software
  • Cell phones or cameras for video production
  • Schoology LMS

Pedagogical Content Knowledge (PCK)

 Describe:  Inquiry-based learning works well when teaching the gas laws as much of the content is conceptual and requires the development of  mental models.  Having students investigate and discover the answers on their own has worked well in previous assignments of this type.  Students are given strict guidelines as to where to go to perform their investigations, but they have the freedom to choose the order and manner in which they explore the topics.  Students are also given freedom and creativity in choosing how to exhibit their understanding with the final video assessment project.

Support: In my AP institute we looked at the work of Vygotsky and Dewey. Their work showed that inquiry-based learning significantly improved student science achievement scores.

Technological Content Knowledge (TCK)

 Describe:  The websites chosen allow the students to study the conceptual relationships between pressures, volumes and temperatures of gasses.  The websites use interactive tutorials and animations that help students to develop mental models of gas behavior.  The questions that follow the interactive tutorials allow the students to test their understanding of the concepts.  If they cannot answer a significant number of the questions successfully they are automatically sent back to the tutorial to determine their misconceptions. If students do not have a firm grasp on the conceptual behavior of gases they will struggle later with the mathematical applications.

  • https://www.simbucket.com/gasestut.swf
  • https://www.simbucket.com/gasesprob.swf
  • https://phet.colorado.edu/en/simulation/gas-properties

The inquiry laboratory investigations for this lesson can be done when the conceptual understanding from the interactive tutorials is complete. The laboratory procedures use laptop computers and computer interface probes that allow students to collect and interpret data. The laboratory procedures chosen allow the students to conduct a series of experiments, each of which illustrates a different gas property.  They will be given a list of equipment and materials and some general guidelines to help them get started with each experiment.  Three properties of gases will be investigated: pressure, volume, and temperature.  By assembling the equipment, conducting the appropriate tests, and analyzing their data and observations, they will be able to describe the properties of gases qualitatively.  The inquiry nature of the experiments lets the students explore and reinforce their conceptual understanding.

Support: In my AP institute we looked at research that  showed that students engaged in inquiry-based learning in the laboratory demonstrated improved learning and higher test scores

Technological Pedagogical Knowledge (TPK)

Describe:  The use of the interactive websites and computer interface labs help to make the lesson more interactive and exciting. Students often struggle with the abstract concepts in chemistry. It is important to use models online where manipulation and visualization of science concepts can be explored. The use of these interactive models allows students to discover scientific knowledge rather than just being given the facts.  Students also need to see the physical results of their conceptual understanding in the laboratory. The use of the laboratory probes and graphic analysis software makes the lesson very inquiry based, allowing students to develop a deeper understanding of the abstract concepts.  As a final summary assessment, each lab table (four students) will make a short video discussing the results of one of their gas law experiments and share it. The LMS Schoology has a nice media sharing function built in. The students can upload their videos into this media folder and share them with all of the classes.  I have found that when students make videos of their laboratory results they seem to take more ownership of and have a deeper understanding of the content.

Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge (TPACK)

Describe: A variety of activities were chosen to involve the students in the complex concepts of gas law behavior.  Integrating the interactive tutorials, the inquiry labs with the graphical software and the video production heightens the student engagement and hopefully creates a depth of understanding beyond a simple teacher-centered lesson.   Chemistry topics are great for inquiry-based learning because of their natural investigative nature. Learning chemistry requires students to ask questions and solve problems and this fits perfectly with inquiry-based learning.

Learning Activities

I like the idea of using Concept Maps in my module as they will allow the students to link the abstract concepts in the gas law topics. I also like the creative thinking that the concept maps encourage. Being able to show the connections between these abstract concepts is a main focus of my module. The concept map links that the students make will help them to see how a concept in one area on the map is related to a concept in another area on the map.

I will also be using Group Activities in my blended module. The in-class laboratory activities in my module will lend themselves to the sharing of student results. The laboratory groups will consist of four students.  Within each group the students will have clearly defined tasks for all members of the group.

Problem Solving will also play an important role in my blended online module. The topics in the gas laws are quite quantitative and involve some fairly rigorous calculations.  I plan on using Khan Academy and other online tutorials to introduce the math topics and then have the students work in groups to develop their problem solving skills.  I plan on using some real life scenarios like the Hindenburg tragedy and hot air balloons that can help to spark interest in the problem solving sessions.

Student Generated Media will allow my students to share the results of their laboratory experiments with the class. I like the idea of having each lab group focus on one specific experiment and then share their results as an ePortfolio in the Media folder on Schoology.

Roles of the Online Instructor

In the reading the article examining online instructor roles,  I discovered that many of the roles outlined for online instruction, were roles I already undertake with face to face instruction.  I am looking forward to the challenge of applying these roles to the blended learning module that I am developing.  Listed within each of the four main roles were detailed examples of how an instructor could meet with success in that role. I think that the most exciting role for me is the Pedagogical role. This role allows me to share and build knowledge in my module.   Under this dimension, the role of Course Designer is the one that I enjoy the most.   Finding and designing materials to enhance the learning experience has always been one of my favorite parts of teaching.  I think that while it might take more time to find those really good online resources that will enhance learning,  I will enjoy the search.   I have had some experience with designing my online flipped classroom lessons.  I enjoy finding great interactive materials and I enjoy making my own lecture videos with Camtasia.  Making my own videos allows me to have complete control over the content that I deliver to my students.  I can give them the exact information that I want them to have and not have to rely on other sources that might not have exactly what I am looking for.  I also think that by making my own videos I am establishing that all important teacher presence even outside of the classroom.

I think the Feedback-Giver is probably one of the most important roles that a teacher can play. I know from experience that students want their tests and quizzes graded almost immediately!  There are some online assessment tools that can give the students and me that immediate feedback.  I often assign a video for students to watch and then have them take a short quiz on the content.  The quiz gives them immediate feedback on their understanding and I can check to see what they are having trouble with before we meet back in class.  In my module I plan to have several online quizzes that will give this immediate feedback.  Schoology has a great online quiz feature that also gives me immediate statistical analysis of student quizzes.

Under the Managerial dimension, it is the Organizer and Planner that I can relate most to.  Getting the “flow” in an online course that I think is so necessary in a face to face course is probably going to be challenging.  I am excited to try and build that organizational structure in my online/blended module.  While the authors listed Media Designer under the Technical domain, I can also see it as part of the Pedagogical domain, where you are designing your learning experience very specifically for your students.  I love playing with the different methods of preparing educational videos, it can be a bit addicting, and you need to focus on how to use the bells and whistles to really help students learn. I don’t want to get too caught up in the making of video media at the expense of designing the overall module.  In the article Teaching in an Online Learning Context one statement gave me great hope… “One does not have to be a technical expert to be an effective online teacher… the effective online learning teacher must have the type of resilience, innovativeness, and perseverance typical of all pioneers in unfamiliar terrain.”

I will be least likely to employ the role of Conference manager and Social rapport builder as I will still be seeing my students on a daily basis and we will be interacting in the classroom. I would like to try and incorporate an online discussion group at some point, but I don’t think it is necessary to the student learning in this module.

 

 

TPACK Lesson

Like a lot of teachers that have been around for a while, I had never heard of TPACK.  I did enjoy writing the lesson plan, but I am not quite sure if it fits the TPACK model precisely.  I think I will need to read some other teacher lesson plans to get the full idea!

Lesson Description:

This is a lesson that introduces the conceptual understandings needed to further study the gas laws.  The lesson will be a qualitative inquiry introduction to the gas laws that will lead to later lessons that have a more quantitative viewpoint.  In this lesson, students will use online interactive computer tutorials, computer interface probes with graphical analysis software, and videos to investigate the relationships involved in the gas laws. The lesson will run for two ninety minute blocks. The students will come together as a whole group at the end of the lesson to share and discuss their lab videos. The students involved in the lesson are honors high school sophomores and juniors.

 The main Content (C) of this lesson is:

  • The relationship between pressure and temperature for a gas.
  • The relationship between temperature and volume for a gas.
  • The relationship between volume and pressure for a gas.

The main Pedagogy (P) of this lesson is inquiry based learning.

The main Technology (T) of this lesson is:

  • Laptop computers
  • Computer laboratory probes with graphical analysis software
  • Cell phones or cameras for video production
  • Schoology LMS

Pedagogical Content Knowledge (PCK)

 Describe:  Inquiry-based learning works well when teaching the gas laws as much of the content is conceptual and requires the development of  mental models.  Having students investigate and discover the answers on their own has worked well in previous assignments of this type.  Students are given strict guidelines as to where to go to perform their investigations, but they have the freedom to choose the order and manner in which they explore the topics.  Students are also given freedom and creativity in choosing how to exhibit their understanding with the final video assessment project.

Support: In my AP institute we looked at the work of Vygotsky and Dewey. Their work showed that inquiry-based learning significantly improved student science achievement scores.

Technological Content Knowledge (TCK)

 Describe:  The websites chosen allow the students to study the conceptual relationships between pressures, volumes and temperatures of gasses.  The websites use interactive tutorials and animations that help students to develop mental models of gas behavior.  The questions that follow the interactive tutorials allow the students to test their understanding of the concepts.  If they cannot answer a significant number of the questions successfully they are automatically sent back to the tutorial to determine their misconceptions. If students do not have a firm grasp on the conceptual behavior of gases they will struggle later with the mathematical applications.

  • https://www.simbucket.com/gasestut.swf
  • https://www.simbucket.com/gasesprob.swf
  • https://phet.colorado.edu/en/simulation/gas-properties

The inquiry laboratory investigations for this lesson can be done when the conceptual understanding from the interactive tutorials is complete. The laboratory procedures use laptop computers and computer interface probes that allow students to collect and interpret data. The laboratory procedures chosen allow the students to conduct a series of experiments, each of which illustrates a different gas property.  They will be given a list of equipment and materials and some general guidelines to help them get started with each experiment.  Three properties of gases will be investigated: pressure, volume, and temperature.  By assembling the equipment, conducting the appropriate tests, and analyzing their data and observations, they will be able to describe the properties of gases qualitatively.  The inquiry nature of the experiments lets the students explore and reinforce their conceptual understanding.

As a final summary assessment, each lab table (four students) will make a short video discussing the results of one of their gas law experiments and share it. The LMS Schoology has a nice media sharing function built in. The students can upload their videos into this media folder and share them with all of the classes.

Support: In my AP institute we looked at research that  showed that students engaged in inquiry-based learning in the laboratory demonstrated improved learning and higher test scores

Technological Pedagogical Knowledge (TPK)

Describe:  The use of the interactive websites and computer interface labs help to make the lesson more interactive and exciting. Students often struggle with the abstract concepts in chemistry. It is important to use models online where manipulation and visualization of science concepts can be explored. The use of these interactive models allows students to discover scientific knowledge rather than just being given the facts.  Students also need to see the physical results of their conceptual understanding in the laboratory. The use of the laboratory probes and graphic analysis software makes the lesson very inquiry based, allowing students to develop a deeper understanding of the abstract concepts.

Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge (TPACK)

Describe: A variety of activities were chosen to involve the students in the complex concepts of gas law behavior.  Integrating the interactive tutorials, the inquiry labs with the graphical software and the video production heightens the student engagement and hopefully creates a depth of understanding beyond a simple teacher-centered lesson.

 

 

 

Outline- Gas Law Module

ONLINE GAS LAW MODULE OUTLINE

hotair-balloon   PSC: LOW-RES PROOF REQ? = 1

This module is designed for a hybrid class. The students will be in the classroom for online group work, quizzes and laboratory work.  They will be making and posting videos of their laboratory results. The students will be working online individually with the notes, individual practice problems and online tutorials.

The first lessons concentrate on describing a gas in terms of its properties: pressure, volume, temperature, and amount of substance. The following lessons concentrate on how experimental relationships connect the properties of gases. The gas laws will be rationalized using a series of hypotheses about the molecular structure of gases.

Learning Objectives

  • Understand the definition of pressure. Use the definition to predict and measure pressures experimentally.
  • Describe experiments that show relationships between pressure, temperature, volume, and moles of a gas.
  • Use empirical gas laws to predict how a change in one of the properties of a gas will affect the remaining properties.
  • Use volume-to-mole relationships obtained using the empirical gas laws to solve stoichiometry problems involving gases.
  • Understand the concept of partial pressure in mixtures of gases.
  • Use the ideal kinetic-molecular model to explain the empirical gas laws.

Lesson #1:

Online Activities:

  1. Podcast #1a – Boyle’s Law
  2. Online tutorial – Boyle’s Law
  3. Online practice problems: unit conversions and Boyle’s Law

In Class Activities:

  1. Online group practice problems
  2. Boyle’s Law Lab
  3. Work on lab report with lab partner – students will be making videos of their laboratory results and posting them on Schoology
  4. Quiz

Lesson #2:

Online Activities:

  1. Podcast #1b – Charles’s Law
  2. Online tutorial – Charles’s Law
  3. Online practice problems: Charles’s Law

In Class Activities:

  1. Online group practice problems
  2. Charles’s Law Lab
  3. Work on lab report with lab partner – students will be making videos of their laboratory results and posting them on Schoology
  4. Quiz

Lesson #3:

Online Activities:

  1. Podcast #1c – Gay Lussac’s Law and Combined Gas Law
  2. Online tutorial: Lussac’s Law
  3. Online practice problems: Gay Lussac’s Law and Combined Gas Law

In Class Activities:

  1. Online group practice problems
  2. Gay Lussac’s Lab
  3. Work on lab report with lab partner – students will be making videos of their laboratory results and posting them on Schoology
  4. Quiz

Lesson #4:

Online Activities:

  1. Podcast #2 – The Ideal Gas Law
  2. Online tutorial: Ideal Gas Law
  3. Online practice problems: Ideal Gas Law

In Class Activities:

  1. Online group practice problems
  2. Exploring Properties of Gases Lab
  3. Work on lab report with lab partner – students will be making videos of their laboratory results and posting them on Schoology
  4. Quiz

Lesson #5:

Online Activities:

  1. Podcast #3 – STP Problems
  2. Online tutorial: STP
  3. Online practice problems: STP

In Class Activities:

  1. Online group practice problems
  2. The Molar Volume of a Gas Lab
  3. Work on lab report with lab partner – students will be making videos of their laboratory results and posting them on Schoology
  4. Quiz

Lesson #6:

Online Activities:

  1. Online tutorial lesson: Dalton’s Law
  2. Online tutorial lesson: Graham’s Law
  3. Online practice problems

In Class Activities:

  1. Online group practice problems
  2. Gas Stoichiometry Lab
  3. Work on lab report with lab partner – students will be making videos of their laboratory results and posting them on Schoology
  4. Quiz

Lesson #7:

  1. TEST
  • Boyle’s and Charles’s and Lussac’s Gas Laws
  • Combined Gas Law
  • Ideal Gas Law
  • Dalton’s and Graham’s Laws
  • Gas Stoichiometry

Differentiation

The Universal Design for Learning website had some interesting links that I think will be useful as I continue to plan my module lesson. I particularly found these links useful:

Foster Collaboration and Community

Mastery Oriented Feedback

Support Memory and Transfer

I know that I will really need to work on fostering that collaboration in my module.  I also want to work on getting feedback from students.

The book excerpt was a little tougher to get through. I was overwhelmed with all of the different differentiations that were mentioned.  It never would have occurred to me that you would need so many multiple means of representation and expression in an online course.  With students in our classrooms we can observe when they are having difficulty with a topic and we can step in and correct the situation.  As the authors stated,  many of the course design features that work for students with learning disabilities would work for anyone.  I think that Schoology appears to provide many of the differentiations that were mentioned in the reading.  Many of the requirements mentioned as being needed to differentiate an online class are just as necessary in a face to face classroom.  Again, as many teachers have noted, the techniques that provide good differentiation online are really no different from the techniques used in face to face instruction.  I think that what is more challenging for the online teacher is selecting the right technology for the type of  interaction that you are looking for.

The resource I found was  http://www.jonbergmann.com/about-m/.

This resource gives specific information on Flipped Learning. The site was developed by Jon Bergmann. Bergmann is one of the pioneers of the Flipped Class Movement. Jon is the author of several books and he is the founder of the global FlipCon conferences.  What I found most interesting was that he spent 24 years as high school chemistry teacher before becoming the lead technology facilitator for a large school district. He also serves on the advisory board for TED-Education.  In 2013, he was named one of Tech & Learning’s 10 Most Influential People. The site is filled with articles and research and resources that support the Flipped model. The website provides useful links to tools for preparing and producing your own educational videos. Making my own educational videos is something that I have been working on for several years.  I am really looking to try and take my videos to the next level.  I found some useful information on video production and hosting.  I was particularly interested in the Comparisons of Interactive Video Tools:

EduCanon        EdPuzzle          Zaption                                Office Mix

123    4

Verso                    TechSmith Relay   Adobe Presenter    Google Apps for Ed

5   6        7               8

One article posted on the website really caught my attention… “Why Teachers Matter More in a Flipped Classroom”   The article discusses the mistaken idea that teaching is the pouring out of information from the teacher into the student. The reason Flipped Learning makes teachers more valuable is that it changes the dynamic of the classroom. No longer is content delivery the main focus of the class. Instead, teachers take on the role of a facilitator of learning. They can work with students in small groups and have more one-on-one interactions.  With the content delivered online, each student gets his/her own education tailored to their individual needs.  This seems to me to be the ultimate differentiation. This is exactly what I am hoping to be able to accomplish in my classroom. The many resources available at this site are going to be invaluable to me as I work to develop my module.

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