“10 Ways Social Media Affects Mental Health.” Degreed Atom. 29 Apr. 2015. Web. 5 Nov. 2015.

The first source I chose was written by a Public Relations Specialist named Karen Frazier. She separated her argument into sections of what and how social media effects us. She actually talked some areas of our lives that are negatively effected that I would not have thought about. For example, she states that hyper-networking (more than three hours on social networks per day) and hyper texting (more than 120 text messages per day) correlated with unhealthy behaviors in teens, including drinking, smoking and sexual activity.

“10 Ways Social Media Affects Mental Health.” Degreed Atom. 29 Apr. 2015. Web. 5 Nov. 2015.

The second source I found addresses the mental health effects caused by social media. Although it does contain some facts concerning the positive effects of social media, I believe there are some very good facts that raise a big issue when it comes to social media. For example, cyberbullying is an enormous concern with today’s technology. An organization that aims for internet safety, called Enough is Enough, conducted a survey that found 95% of teenagers who use social media have witnessed cyberbullying, and 33% have been victims themselves.

 

“Negative Effects of Social Networking Sites for Students – Performancing.” Performancing. 2 Nov. 2012. Web. 5 Nov. 2015.

The third source I found addresses the negative effects of social media concerning students. I thought this would be a valuable source because it provides quality information for my research and the information and facts are based on a survey of students. The descriptions for each topic may be short, but some of the topics are very important. For example, the effects of social media on a student’s grades, physical health, and reduction in human interaction are discussed. These topics can contribute to my argument tremendously.

 

“10 Ways Social Media Affects Mental Health.” Degreed Atom. 29 Apr. 2015. Web. 5 Nov. 2015.

The fourth source I found addresses how face to face interactions are more beneficial than social media interactions. I thought this would be a valuable source because it talks about how social media effects a large majority of the world and how it can be a detriment to communication. Lemoyne College Professor of Psychology Krystine Batcho said, “Real life interactions add a whole extra layer to how people benefit with relationships for other people than cyber ones.” The article reinforces the theory that there are many more benefits to face to face interactions opposed to social media interactions which will help me form a stronger argument.

 

“Kim Stolz: How Social Media Is Ruining Our Relationships.” Time. Time. Web. 5 Nov. 2015.

The fifth source I found addresses how relationships are negatively effected by social media. This article seemed a little off topic to me at first. However, after delving into it a little deeper I found that it made some great points on how addiction to social media can be a detriment to relationships and interactions between people. There is some statistical data that supports the claim that people today may be addicted to checking their phone all the time. I can use this source to support my claim that addiction to social media can negatively impact face to face interactions.

 

“The Negative Effects of Social Networks – Social Networks.” The Negative Effects of Social Networks – Social Networks. Web. 5 Nov. 2015.

The sixth source I found is a paper written on the negative effects of social media. This paper covered many topics of the negative impact that social media has on us, but theres a communication section that is filled with information and statistical data proving that the quality of interactions occurring today are declining since so many conversations happen over social media. This will help me form by argument by providing me with usable statistical data to reinforce my argument as well as real world examples of how social media can be a bad thing when concerning communication skills.

 

 

 

This article has 4 comments

  1. Reply

    face to face interations are also more beneficial because text leaves room to false interoperation of words and attitudes! I think this is a great topic

  2. Jon Becker Reply

    Darrell, you’ll need to find more primary and scholarly (peer-reviewed) research. I don’t see any of that here. It’s very important to support your argument primarily with evidence that’s been vetted via a peer-review process.

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *