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digisocymethods

Rachel B. Personal Introduction – SOC 676

Hello! I’m hoping these work as intended. I can sometimes be a bit verbose, my apologies! I never want anything I say or mean to be misconstrued across digital channels (because that never happens!).

Rambling: part 1
Rambling: part 2. Featuring a bad still/freeze frame.

10 replies on “Rachel B. Personal Introduction – SOC 676”

Rachel,
Thanks for sharing your video, I enjoyed learning a little about you and I look forward to being in the course with you. Cool that you are looking into getting duel citizenship with the Italian side of your family. Half of my family is from Europe as well, my mother grew up in Brussels, Belgium, and I am eligible for citizenship there, SO let me know how the process goes for you. To your comment that there is nothing unique/cool about you, I imagine there are very cool things about you including your family history, and I found that quite interesting- always neat to learn about where people are from. Sounds like you have had an introduction to several programming languages which should help in this course. Best of luck, and good luck with the product innovation/design focus- that is another cool thing about you.

Take care.

Benjamin

Hi, Rachel! Your computer science minor and experience with other programming sounds helpful for this course. Industries pushing more towards streaming and on-demand services is definitely important to look at, especially how it affects mental health.

Oh I hadn’t considered fully the ramifications on mental health! I think we’re the guinea pigs for mental health management in an information society and part of me is grateful for the “ignorance is bliss,” and part of me wishes I have insight now that doesn’t yet exist!

Hello, Rachel,

Welcome welcome! I am glad to have you here. I think that your perspective will be a great value to the course. Cross-disciplinary input and feedback, particularly from people who are not as familiar with sociology, is crucial to keeping the discipline relevant and fresh. We, sociologists, can and do fall into echo chambers of our own, so we need to avoid this at all costs. I think your heritage is fascinating and indeed very very interesting. I am Italian American (which is near and dear to my heart), so welcome paisan!

I’m glad to hear that my lack of in-depth knowledge might be appreciated or useful, I want to make sure I’m not a hindrance in group work or heavy class discussion. And that’s so cool to hear about–I’ve only visited Northern regions of Italy but I feel the siren call of southern Sicily as I yearn to learn about the heritage and culture my grandparents worked to separate from my father’s identity in his childhood. Thankfully, the internet helps me learn so much more about my past! I got to show my dad his (unknown to him) grandfather’s signature via Ancestry.com. I’m intrigued to see how these sorts of sites connect people with cultures digitally where there used to be an physical communication gap.

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