hands writing

Wright Center to host mock study section for NIH applicants

This summer, the Wright Center will host National Institutes of Health (NIH)-style mock study sections to support faculty science and funding.

The sections closely mimic an actual NIH study section and are scheduled for researchers looking to apply for one of their fall grant cycles. All VCU junior faculty interested in clinical and translational research are encouraged to participate.

To get started, submit the required materials in the Mock Study Section Letter of Intent before 11:59 p.m. EST on July 6. Accepted applicants will be informed by July 8 and receive a link to submit all grant materials.

Letter of Intent (LOI) deadline: July 6

If accepted, grant material deadline: August 3

Mock study sections: August 20-28

Three experienced reviewers will evaluate and score grant materials prior to the mock study section. Applicants will be assigned a mutually agreed upon mock study section date and time between August 20 and 28. During the session, the entire panel will discuss the grant proposal and revisit their scores. The applicant and observers attend to learn the process and hear the grant discussion.

Applicants will receive summary feedback within five days after their mock session – about five weeks prior to the NIH October deadlines. This will include a compilation of written critiques and a summary from the co-chair, either Patrick Nana-Sinkam, M.D., or Arun Sanyal, M.D.

The program provides a critical review and targeted, comprehensive feedback to applicants and seeks to increase the likelihood of grant funding success for VCU junior faculty.

Observers are encouraged to attend the mock study sections in late August to receive a better understanding of the review process and to gain insight into how reviewers evaluate applications.

Review and download full program information.

graphic for mock study sections

Community engagement transcends translational science spectrum at annual conference

Dr. Gerry Moeller speaks animatedly wearing a suit in front of a mustard yellow wall
Wright Center Director F. Gerard Moeller, M.D. Photo by Kevin Morley, VCU University Relations.

By Anne Dreyfuss
VCU C. Kenneth and Dianne Wright Center for Clinical and Translational Research

At the Virginia Commonwealth University Community Engagement Institute on May 14, Wright Center Director F. Gerard Moeller, M.D., discussed how he harnesses community-academic partnerships to address the opioid epidemic.

“Virginia has succumbed to the opioid overdose epidemic just like the rest of the country, and the patterns vary significantly from one county to the next,” he said. “Dealing effectively with this is going to require a community-engaged approach. We will not have an impact without fostering partnerships with our community.”

The mantra of community members’ fundamental role in impactful translational research echoed throughout the two-day conference held on the VCU Monroe Park Campus, where more than 80 community-engaged scholars gathered to explore the power and potential of university-community partnerships.

“The Community Engagement Institute provided us with an opportunity to connect and re-establish existing connections with people who are energized about continuously improving our community engagement efforts,” said Wright Center community engagement associate Alicia Aroche, who helped plan the conference and presented on best practices for communicating about the work of community-academic partnerships.

Since May 2014, the Wright Center and the VCU Division of Community Engagement have partnered annually to host the event that unites academic and community stakeholders who share a commitment to solving challenges through community-academic collaboration. “When you have complex problems, it takes people with varying expertise from the community and academic centers to solve them,” said VCU Division of Community Engagement vice provost Cathy Howard, Ph.D. Through interactive workshops, attendees built skills around initiating and sustaining community-academic partnerships, as well as assessing and communicating the work of such partnerships.

“Partnering with our communities allows us to do better research,” said Wright Center community-engaged research co-director Alex Krist, M.D.

The three Wright Center Clinical Research KL2 Scholars smile for a photo. They are all wearing cardigans.
Wright Center Clinical Research KL2 Scholars (from left to right) Guizhi (Julian) Zhu, Ph.D.; Mario Acunzo, M.D.; and Elizabeth Wolf, M.D. Photo by Kevin Morley, VCU University Relations.

Krist is a mentor to Wright Center Clinical Research KL2 Scholar Elizabeth Wolf, M.D., who is working on a community-engagement project that aims to identify geographic and patient-level risk factors for inadequate prenatal and well-child care in the Greater Richmond Region. “I attended the Community Engagement Institute because I wanted to learn more about best principles that I could apply to my research,” Wolf said. The assistant professor of pediatrics and emergency care at VCU School of Medicine is partnering with the VCU Center on Society and Health’s Engaging Richmond program to develop strategies aimed at reducing health disparities for vulnerable women and children.

The conference was funded in-part through the $21.5 million Clinical and Translational Science Award that the Wright Center received from the National Institutes of Health in 2018. The largest NIH grant in VCU’s history allows the Wright Center to collaborate across disciplines within the university and health system, and with community partners around the region, all with the shared goal of accelerating innovative research that advances the scientific study of human health.

“Events like the annual Community Engagement Institute allow us to better mobilize existing strengths in community engagement and team science to engage stakeholder communities at every translational phase,” Krist said. “Ultimately, we want to work with community members as research partners and form collaborative clinical research translational science teams to improve the health of our communities together.”

Wright Center hosts Mentorship Academy aimed at creating a culture of mentorship at VCU

By Anne Dreyfuss
VCU C. Kenneth and Dianne Wright Center for Clinical and Translational Research

Dr. Nana-Sinkam points behind him to a screen with an infographic describing training opportunities
Wright Center KL2 program co-director Patrick Nana-Sinkam, M.D., presented on training and mentorship opportunities at the Wright Center during the 2019 Mentorship Academy. Photo by Allen Jones, VCU University Relations

At the Wright Center Mentorship Academy on May 3, nearly 50 faculty researchers from eight schools and colleges across the Virginia Commonwealth University MCV and Monroe Park Campuses gathered to discuss mentorship best practices.

“We set out to identify leadership from across the university to attend the Mentorship Academy, with the ultimate goal of using this as a starting point from which to foster a culture of mentorship at VCU,” said Wright Center KL2 program co-director Patrick Nana-Sinkam, M.D. The VCU School of Medicine professor and division chair organized the daylong conference at which attendees discussed ways to create and nurture a culture of mentorship within their schools, colleges and departments.

The workshop was facilitated by the Center for Improvement of Mentored Experiences in Research, which is a nationally recognized leader in providing mentoring and training resources. The evidence-based program was developed at the University of Wisconsin-Madison to help mentors develop skills for engaging in productive, culturally responsive research mentoring relationships that optimize the success of mentors and mentees. “We are here to help VCU faculty promote their own mentoring initiatives by thinking strategically about their mentoring practices and leveraging the experiences of their colleagues to learn from one another,” said program facilitator Kelly Diggs-Andrews, Ph.D.

Throughout the day, VCU faculty members learned skills and developed tools to help them build, increase and improve departmental mentorship infrastructure. “The culture of mentoring is complex,” said Gregory Triplett, Ph.D. The associate dean for graduate studies and research at the VCU College of Engineering attended hoping to learn mentoring strategies that he could bring back to his colleagues. “Workshops such as this provide important details for frameworks that we can further expand upon at our individual units,” he said.

While previous Mentorship Academies hosted by the Wright Center have included mostly trainees and junior faculty members, the 2019 event was targeted toward senior-level faculty members to try to increase institutional support for building a culture of mentorship at VCU. Attendees included 25 professors from VCU Schools of Medicine, Dentistry, Nursing, and Pharmacy, as well as the VCU Colleges of Engineering, Humanities and Sciences, and Health Professions, and VCU Life Sciences. Also in attendance were three School of Medicine department chairs, three members of the VCU Vice President for Research and Innovation’s Research Development Advisory Council, the School of Medicine’s associate chair for faculty development and the VCU senior vice provost for faculty affairs.

“In order to achieve our goal of fostering a culture of mentorship throughout VCU and VCU Health, we need buy in from senior leadership,” Nana-Sinkam said. “We want to help create a sustainable pool of senior faculty mentors and incentivize those mentors to create a community.”

A pyramid-shaped infographic describing mentorship and training opportunities available at the Wright Center
Wright Center training opportunities include mock study sections, grant writing seminars and biostatistics assistance.

The day included presentations and facilitated discussions on topics including maintaining effective communication, aligning expectations between mentors and mentees, addressing equity and inclusion, and promoting professional development and work-life integration.

In the afternoon, Nana-Sinkam and Wright Center Director F. Gerard Moeller, M.D., presented on training opportunities within the Wright Center, including grant writing seminars, mock study sections, and assistance with bioinformatics and biostatistics. They highlighted the Wright Center’s newest program, Faculty Mentor Office Hours, where early career faculty can sign-up to meet with senior faculty mentors and discuss topics ranging from promotion and tenure to professional development and grant applications. They also discussed several research training programs administered by the Wright Center, including the Emerging Scholars program, Translational Science Scholars program and KL2 Program, which provide early career researchers with the opportunity to participate in mentored research and career development activities. They ended the presentation with a review of the research supplements that are provided by the Wright Center through the National Institutes of Health to promote diversity and re-entry into biomedical and health-related research professions.

“There is a huge need for leadership in the biomedical research space,” said Moeller, adding that the Wright Center programs he presented on are intended to address that shortage. “We need mentors who are equipped to train the next generation of researchers because without mentorship, junior faculty are not going to succeed.”

The program was made possible through the $21.5 million Clinical and Translational Science Award that the Wright Center received from the NIH in 2018. The largest NIH grant in VCU’s history allows the Wright Center to facilitate collaboration among diverse expertise within the university.

“The Wright Center’s mission is to translate basic science to having an impact on the health of the community and we need translational researchers in the pipeline to carry that mission forward,” Moeller said. “By training a new generation of interdisciplinary clinical and translational scholars, we can work toward ensuring our vision is sustained.”

Inaugural Virginia Clinical Research Conference inspires and strengthens the commonwealth’s clinical research enterprise

T.J. Sharpe addresses the crowd at the Virginia Clinical Research Conference
Metastatic melanoma survivor and clinical research participant T.J. Sharpe talks to Virginia Clinical Research Conference attendees about how clinical trials saved his life. Photo by Kevin Morley, VCU University Relations.

By Anne Dreyfuss
C. Kenneth and Dianne Wright Center for Clinical and Translational Research

The ballroom inside the Hilton Hotel in downtown Richmond was standing room only on Friday morning, when more than 200 clinical research professionals from across the commonwealth gathered for the inaugural Virginia Clinical Research Conference.

“At the end of every clinical trial, there is a family waiting,” keynote speaker T.J. Sharpe said to the crowd of clinical and translational scientists who had assembled for the first conference aimed at strengthening the clinical research enterprise throughout the state. The conference, titled “Engagement: 2019,” was hosted by the Virginia Commonwealth University C. Kenneth and Dianne Wright Center for Clinical and Translational Research with participation from VCU Health and the VCU Office of Research and Innovation.

“We designed the conference as an opportunity to work with academic medical centers across the state,” said Wright Center Director F. Gerard Moeller, M.D. “We wanted to identify ways to become more engaged with one another, as well as the communities we serve, as we work to design, test, and deliver innovative treatment options for patients.” In addition to VCU and VCU Health, attendees hailed from institutions including Eastern Virginia Medical School, the University of Virginia, Virginia Tech Carilion School of Medicine, Inova Health System and Bon Secours Health System.

In his presentation, Sharpe talked about how enrolling in a clinical trial saved his life. In August 2012 — just weeks after the birth of his second child — Sharpe was diagnosed with metastatic melanoma, which is the most dangerous form of skin cancer. His physician gave him less than two years to live. “My purpose wasn’t to be a cancer survivor,” Sharpe said. “It was to be a dad, husband, brother and uncle, but to do that I needed to find a treatment that would give me a chance to fulfill my purpose.”

Knowing the five-year survival rate for metastatic melanoma hovered between 15 and 20 percent, Sharpe enrolled in two clinical trials to try to beat his long odds of survival. Now nearly seven years after the diagnosis and living cancer free, the Fort Lauderdale, Florida-resident has forged a career as a patient advocate and clinical trial experience expert, making it his life’s mission to share the value of clinical research with audiences around the country. “I’m dance dad now on Tuesdays, taking my daughter back-and-forth to dance,” Sharpe said. “These days, my wife and I take the kids on white water rafting trips and go hiking in Maine.”

Sharpe urged the crowd of clinical research professionals to think of him and countless others like him who depend on research they do every day. “My other purpose now is to bring my message to the clinical research world and implore those who have the ability to affect the lives of patients to do so,” he said. “It gave me hope to know there were researchers out there doing incredible work and I wanted to be a part of that. I wanted the opportunity to help other people and make the world a better place through clinical trial participation.”

Wright Center clinical research KL2 scholar Mario Acunzo, Ph.D., speaks with Wright Center director F. Gerard Moeller, M.D., about his research poster. Photo by Kevin Morley, VCU University Relations.

Throughout the daylong conference, attendees discussed how they can work together to help more people like Sharpe. At packed workshops centering on topics including how to engage the community, use big data and work more closely with investigational pharmacists, attendees shared perspectives and collaborated on new opportunities in clinical research.

“Uncovering your unconscious bias makes all the difference in the world as a clinical researcher,” said VCU School of Nursing associate professor Jo Lynne Robins, Ph.D. Robins was a panelist at an interactive workshop on engaging community partners in the practice of clinical research, where researchers and community health providers exchanged experiences and advice for how build better relationships. “The reason we do research is because we want to make a difference in patients’ lives,” Robins said. “We need to find common ground where we’re all committed to the same thing.”

At a breakout session on research ethics, Francis Macrina, Ph.D., posed a hypothesis that it should be possible to tailor a curriculum of responsible research conduct aimed at clinical and translational scientists. “We can and should begin to tailor responsible conduct of research curricula to specific audiences. One size doesn’t fit all anymore,” said the former vice president for research and innovation at VCU.

At the end of the conference, prizes were awarded for poster competition presentations. Thomas Corey Davis, Ph.D., who is an assistant professor and vice chair of clinical affairs in the VCU College of Health Professions Department of Nurse Anesthesia, was awarded the best poster in the category clinical research best practices/quality improvement/process innovations. Elizabeth Krieger, M.D., who is a fellow in the VCU School of Medicine Division of Hematology, Oncology and Palliative Care, was awarded the best poster in the category clinical science research.

“We hope for you to take these discussions beyond this conference,” said Wright Center associate director Antonio Abbate, M.D., Ph.D. At a panel discussion wrapping up the day’s events, Abbate urged conference attendees to apply what they had learned at the conference to their daily research. “There is a person, a face and a smile behind everything that we do,” he said. “Clinical research is an instrument that allows beautiful stories to occur.”

 

Poster competition awardees:

Clinical research

best practices/quality improvement/process innovations:
Title:“Assessing a Novel Method to Reduce Anesthesia Machine Contamination: A Prospective, Observational Trial”

Authors: Thomas Corey Davis, Ph.D., CRNA; Beverly George-Gay, MSN, RN; Praveen Prasanna, M.D.; Emily M. Hill, Ph.D.; Brad Verhulst, Ph.D.; Chuck J. Biddle, Ph.D., CRNA

Clinical science research:
Title: “A Novel KIR-HLA Interaction Scoring System and its Effect on Transplantation Outcomes after HLA Matched Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation”

Authors: Elizabeth Krieger, M.D.; Roy Sabo, Ph.D.; Victoria Okhomina; Catherine Roberts, Ph.D.; Sunauz Moezzi; Caitlin Cain; Marieka Helou, M.D.; John McCarty, M.D., Rizwan Romee M.D.; Rehan Qayyum M.D. MHS; Christina Wiedl, D.O.; Amir Toor, M.D.

Let’s talk about sex: Gender differences in research and health care take center stage at annual Women’s Health Research Day

 

Gretchen Neigh, Ph.D., presents at Women’s Health Research Day. Photo courtesy Lisa Phipps.

By Anne Dreyfuss
VCU C. Kenneth and Dianne Wright Center for Clinical and Translational Research

No topic was off limits at Women’s Health Research Day on April 9, where more than 70 Virginia Commonwealth University faculty, students, staff and community members gathered to discuss how sex and gender differences impact bench-to-bedside research and clinical outcomes.

“There are fundamental differences between men and women that need to be considered in all levels of health care,” said Pam Dillon, Pharm.D., who is a research liaison at the C. Kenneth and Dianne Wright Center for Clinical and Translational Research. Dillon serves on the professional advisory board of the VCU Institute for Women’s Health, which has hosted the annual event for 15 years as a way to celebrate and promote research activities in women’s health at VCU.

Susan Kornstein, M.D., welcomes attendees to Women’s Health Research Day. Photo courtesy Lisa Phipps.

“The goal of Women’s Health Research Day is to bring together researchers from across the university and health system to showcase and share their work,” said VCU Institute for Women’s Health executive director Susan Kornstein, M.D.

The day included a plenary symposium, poster awards and a reception highlighting women’s health research by VCU faculty members and students.

“We have some work to do to move toward equitable representation of sex and gender in research,” said Gretchen Neigh, Ph.D., an associate professor in the Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology at VCU School of Medicine.

Neigh, who serves as the director of translational research at the VCU Institute for Women’s Health, chaired the plenary symposium and presented on why sex matters in research. During her talk, she dispelled conventional excuses for not including women in clinical research and reviewed studies on sex and gender bias in medical school and basic science laboratory settings.

“Simply including women in your research team increases the likelihood that you will pay attention to sex and gender differences in your research outcomes,” Neigh said. She encouraged the audience to pay attention to sex within experimental designs and create diverse research and clinical teams to improve the odds of equity. “Sex and gender impact nearly everything,” she said. “If you interact with other humans on any level of the health care

continuum, you need to be aware of how sex and gender can impact health.”

Poster presentations focused on women’s health, as well as sex and gender differences. They were reviewed for research originality, scientific rigor, and women’s health relevance, with awards presented for posters in basic science, clinical and translational research, and community and public health research.

“The missions of the Wright Center and the VCU Institute for Women’s Health are similar,” said Dillon, who helped plan the conference and served as a judge for the poster competition. “The VCU Institute for Women’s Health is committed to training and supporting women in science, and the Wright Center’s research and training programs provide a strong foundation to help the institute with that mission.”

Poster awardees and VCU Institute of Women’s Health leadership. From left-to-right: Susan Kornstein, M.D., Zaneera Hassan, Candace C. Johnson, Hope Wolf, Albert Ksinan, Dace Svikis, Ph.D., Lisa Phipps, Ph.D., Pharm.D.