Meet the Team: Patty Washington

At the Wright Center, we seek to advance science and foster partnerships that accelerate translational research for the betterment of human health. Our team members come to work every day ready to transform laboratory discoveries into treatments for patients, engage communities in clinical research and train a new generation of clinical and translational scholars, all with the shared goal of bridging the gap between scientific theory and practical medicine.

Each month, we will highlight one member of our team who is contributing to our shared mission of advancing science and fostering partnerships that accelerate translational research for the betterment of human health.

For a full list of staff members, please visit cctr.vcu.edu/aboutus/staff.

Three reasons to register for an ORCID identifier

By Anne Dreyfuss
VCU C. Kenneth and Dianne Wright Center for Clinical and Translational Research

The New Year inspires many of us to make positive changes in our lives. We may resolve to eat healthier, get more sleep, or save money. While those resolutions have the potential to improve our personal lives and overall health, less thought is often given to resolutions that could improve our professional lives.

As a researcher, you have likely heard about ORCID (Open Researcher and Contributor ID). The unique, persistent identifier distinguishes scientific and other academic authors from one another. Perhaps you have been asked to provide an ORCID ID in a grant application or in an academic journal article that you were submitting for review, but haven’t seen the value in taking the time to register.

If you are a researcher, registering for an ORCID ID could be the most impactful resolution you make this year. There are many reasons why more than 5.6 million ORCID IDs have been issued since the organization first launched its registry service in 2012. Some researchers register to make themselves more searchable, while others do so to make their research more accessible to the public. While the motivation for registering may vary and can be as unique as the 16-digit identifiers themselves, the bottom line remains the same – registering for an ORCID ID can help you advance your science and improve your career.

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Medicine professor named a member of the American Society for Clinical Investigation

By Anne Dreyfuss
VCU C. Kenneth and Dianne Wright Center for Clinical and Translational Research

Professor, pulmonologist and cancer researcher Patrick Nana-Sinkam, M.D., has been elected as a member of the American Society for Clinical Investigation. Membership is by election, and only researchers who are 50 years of age or younger are eligible for nomination.

One of the country’s oldest and most respected medical honor societies, the ASCI has more than 3,000 physician-scientist members who translate laboratory findings to the advancement of clinical practice. The society’s mission is to support the scientific efforts, educational needs and clinical aspirations of physician-scientists to improve human health.

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